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Congo Ivory Works

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Close to the Dog & Partridge  on Trippet Lane stands a building with a strange shape in fact its similar to the Three Tuns on Silver Street Head, the building is now used by several businesses but 1862 Chester Brothers were cutting up and selling different types of animal horn for the use of cutlery handles, combs, hair brushes etc. by 1879 it was the business of John Smith a brass & copper dealer, these products were used in many trades in the town. In the late 1890s the building was named the Congo Ivory Works, it was named by William Carlisle & Sons who was again a supplier to the cutlery and hollow-ware trade, it was decorative and easy to work, no thought was given to the elephant who were slaughtered just for their tusks, In 1894 Joseph Westby moved his new business into the Congo Ivory Works, he was the son of a manager at Brookes and Crookes, he was an apprentice here till 1888. he set up as Joseph Westby & Co Ltd. at Congo Works Trippet Lane. Westby died on the 10th of December 1929 at his home, Goole Green Farm Fulwood, he left just £764 in his will, the firms name wasn’t  used again until during the Second World War, when it was based in Furnival Street. The company manufactured pen knives, scissors and novelty items, with their speciality being ruler pen knives, the ruler either being engraved on the scales or folding out of the knife.

Further on Trippet Lane is Trippets bar, I don't know if the owners are aware that all they are doing is continuing the business that operated here from when it was first built c1850, as a beer-house, in 1862 William Scamadine sold his beer to the populous, 1871 saw Charles Pickering take over, by 1879 George Camm was running the house, in 1893 William Blackburn was installed as landlord, William ran the beer-house up to 1901 when James Platt has took over the place by 1911 James has moved or died on as Joe Woodhouse is listed as the man with his name over the door, Joe moved to be a supplier of beer in 1925, his working address was 230  St Philips Road. Obviously the beer-house ceased to dispense its liquid gold sometime in the early 20th century, I find it hard to discover just  what the premises were used for after it closed as a beer-house, what I do know is that J. Dewsnap Bowler Ltd had moved in selling materials to the cutlery industry, buffing sand, different grades of emery, crocus, polishing mops etc.

 

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Trippets Bar was the Red Lion (89 Trippet Lane).

From 1903 to 5th July 1905 when he died, the licensee was Thomas Wreaks, previously of the Norfolk Arms, Ringinglow.

In June 1911 the licence was transferred from Joe Woodhouse to Thomas Round. (Joe went to the Welsh Harp at 230 St Philips Road. In February 1926 the freehold owned by Mr B Gleadhill, and let to Messrs Stones for £60 a year, was sold for £1,000. In November 1927 Rose Hatch, 46 year old housekeeper at the Harp, was killed falling down the cellar steps.  Joe died in 1932)

In May 1912 the Red Lion's licence went from Thomas Round to Frank Naylor

In December 1914 the licence went from Frank Naylor to Thomas Sellers

In September 1916 it was temporarily transferred to Arthur Sanderson, a joiner from Retford, whose wife had experience in the beer trade. The previous licensee had been convicted of selling liquor in prohibited hours and fined £25. In March 1917 the police contested renewal due to bad conduct and the magistrates refused to renew it.

The 1925 Kellys Directory shows Thomas Hill as the licensee. The Red Lion was still in business in January 1930 when the landlord advertised stabling there. But in May 1933 the licence was not renewed and the premises went onto the compensation list.

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1 hour ago, Edmund said:

Trippets Bar was the Red Lion (89 Trippet Lane).

From 1903 to 5th July 1905 when he died, the licensee was Thomas Wreaks, previously of the Norfolk Arms, Ringinglow.

In June 1911 the licence was transferred from Joe Woodhouse to Thomas Round. (Joe went to the Welsh Harp at 230 St Philips Road. In February 1926 the freehold owned by Mr B Gleadhill, and let to Messrs Stones for £60 a year, was sold for £1,000. In November 1927 Rose Hatch, 46 year old housekeeper at the Harp, was killed falling down the cellar steps.  Joe died in 1932)

In May 1912 the Red Lion's licence went from Thomas Round to Frank Naylor

In December 1914 the licence went from Frank Naylor to Thomas Sellers

In September 1916 it was temporarily transferred to Arthur Sanderson, a joiner from Retford, whose wife had experience in the beer trade. The previous licensee had been convicted of selling liquor in prohibited hours and fined £25. In March 1917 the police contested renewal due to bad conduct and the magistrates refused to renew it.

The 1925 Kellys Directory shows Thomas Hill as the licensee. The Red Lion was still in business in January 1930 when the landlord advertised stabling there. But in May 1933 the licence was not renewed and the premises went onto the compensation list.

As usual Edmund you’ve done the business, it does give me more information of the building, just by looking at the building you can see it’s age.

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