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Difficulty reading transcription

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From an ancestors prison record in Australia. The bit after the words remission and 1yr , 6 days and 3. I can read the Clemency on the first line but struggling a bit with the rest. Thanks.  image.png.9a00d59ec183919ac4b8f60c67cd8011.png

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It looks like from something side

so the top one could be from latin side,

and the next 2 from Mrs Flaber? side.

 

 

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I think that 'Mrs' is actually 'Mos' = Months

 

I suspect the middle bit is abbreviations and is the same thing in each except that in the first entry it's not quite so abbreviated.

A guess:

line 1 frm labr   ?farm labour/labourer

lines 2&3  flabr  ?same but more abbreviated

I can't think what the last item is - _ide

Where was this convict held/living?

 

Hugh

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It would be handy to see what section titles are.

 

 

edit,

 

if it is farm labour, could the middle one be - 'something' of poultry?

 

I think it's definitely 'of' something, and preceding word is shortened, hence the '

 

just guesses really

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for your input - 'poultry' could be party as in working party as they were sent out to work from jail.  No headings to that part just detailing day to day stuff and dates - oh and punishments in his case.  It is about Solomon Stenton convicted of manslaughter of his grandmother in 1865 and transported to Australia (mentioned elsewhere on this site). Ancestry has more records online for him. I have his story already up to his death but this new record on ancestry details his life and wrongdoings too while serving his time. He still was a wrong 'un!  

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I agree with Hugh's "farm labourer" abbreviation.  Possibly the next bit is vide 11748 / 37 - vide is latin for see - so refers you to document 11748 / 37 perhaps the full certificate for remission?

On the middle line - On performance of party ??

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Many thanks Edmund - I read it as Vide too. The rest of the document is also difficult but I managed to understand most of it in my own way. Enough that make sense anyway. Several times he was in solitary and a lot of time spent on bread and water. On obtaining his freedom he went to Hobart, spent some time there and returned to Australia marrying a female convict - no children - and he wrote back to friends and relatives telling of his life there which he seemed to enjoy. From information gathered I think his conviction would be classed as unsound these days and local rumours at the time seemed to indicate he was not solely responsible. 

The Sheffield & Rotherham Independent (Sheffield, England), Friday, September 01, 1876.jpg

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26 Jan 1910 Sheffield Daily Telegraph

A CHAPELTOWN TRAGEDY OF

45 YEARS AGO

__________________

Recalled by a Letter from Australia

__________________

 

Mrs Ann Walton, an inmate of Sir Edward Sylvester's Almshouses, Mortomley Lane End, has received the following letter from her cousin Solomon Stenton, who was in 1865, at York Assizes, sentenced to 20 years penal servitude for the manslaughter of his grandmother Eliza Drabble at Chapeltown nr Sheffield in March 1865.

                                       

           Post Office, Waddington, Western Australia

                                                  December 12. 1909

My dear Cousin. – I take the opportunity to write to let you know I am still alive, and well except that rheumatics torment me occasionally. I had a letter from Joe 4 years ago which I answered but I cannot hear any tidings of Bentley. I am getting the old age pension now which is a great help to me. I should like to communicate with Thomas Fairies, and Mrs Howson, if they are still alive. I remember Ben Whyke as on the day I left England; also Shep Barras, Pincher, Link Jackson, Toby and Tom Howson. Send my best regards to Eliza Rodgers. The happiest days of my life out here is when I am in the bush with my gun and my dog. The poor old lady (my wife) died 4 years ago, and I am left all to myself. Send me a long letter and let me know if Joe is still in Canada, and I will write to him. We are having very warm weather out here – 100 degrees in the shade. I will conclude now by wishing you a happy New Year. – I remain, your affectionate Cousin.

                                                                   SOLOMON STENTON

At the time of the tragedy on March, 1865, Solomon Stenton worked at Thorncliffe Ironworks and lived with his grandmother at Greenhead, Chapeltown. It was payday at Thorncliffe and Stenton met the old lady at night and gave her his wages. The two spent some time together at one of the local inns and set off for home around 9pm. Shortly afterwards Eliza Stenton was found lying upon the road at Greenhead. She was dead and had been brutally ill used. Her grandson Solomon was the last person seen with her, and as he could not give a satisfactory explanation he was arrested and at the Coroners inquest the jury returned a verdict of 'Wilful murder' against him. At the Assizes in York, the capital charge was reduced to manslaughter. He was found guilty and sentenced to 20 years transportation. A very large number of Chapeltown people, however had strong opinions that Stenton was innocent, and this feeling spread, and another man's name was freely mentioned as the possible culprit. In 1877 the matter was taken up by request of Mr Tom Fairies, and at a public meeting he was requested to prepare a petition to the authorities, praying for the case to be reopened. The petition was duly signed by a large number of persons and duly forwarded to the Right Hon. Richard Cross, Home Secretary at that time who duly acknowledged the receipt of the same. After some time had lapsed an official intimation reached Chapeltown that Stenton had been liberated on Ticket of Leave having served 12 years of his sentence. It is very likely that Stenton wishes to communicate with Mr Fairies on account of the services of the latter.

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