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RichardB

Montgomery Tavern

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Iris Office, No. 12, Hartshead (later became Montgomery Tavern) - again, no date

http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;y01868&pos=1&action=zoom&id=48836

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1062496082_Montgomery1915.thumb.png.1b8e1ed9b6142aa80f4cd3439cfe09c6.png

Howitt in his "Homes and Haunts of the English Poets" remarked on the coincidence that many of these places later became drinking premises. In commenting on this to his friend Mr. Holland, Montgomery said:

"I was amused with his (Howitt's) statement to the effect that the house in which Moore was born is now a whisky shop; that Burns' native cottage is now a public-house; Shelley's house at Great Marlow a beer shop; the spot where Scott was born occupied with a building for a similar purpose; and even Coleridge's residence at Nether Stowey, the very house in which the poet composed that sweet "Ode to the Nightingale" is now an ordinary beerhouse. Had his visit to Sheffield been only a few weeks later, my own forty years' residence would doubtless have been added to this list; for, as Miss Gales and I walked up Hartshead the other day, talking of "auld lang syne", and not forgetful of the very complimentary character which Mr Howitt had given of that locality, what was our consternation to perceive that our old house was actually converted into a Tom-and-Jerry shop!"

By April 1851 The Montgomery Tavern was in the hands of John Knowles Stephens an his wife.  John died on 27th May 1858 and his wife carried on with the business. In September 1865 Charles Kirkby and his wife Christiana were running the tavern. They also provided lodgings there, which raised the problem of prosecutions related to serving beer to residents/non-residents, and serving beer for breakfast instead of milk or tea. On 10th June 1868 Charles died suddenly aged about 40. His wife carried on with the business and 14th October 1869 married James Gillatt, a file manager, at Pitsmoor. The spirits licence was lost in October 1869 due to prosecutions Christiana suffered while trying to run a rough public-house as a widow. By the April 1871 census, the premises were being used as a lodging house by the Gillatts, with the ground floor a grocers shop run by Job Morton. Interestingly of the 12 lodgers there, 9 were in printing related jobs, probably working for the Leaders who were printing the Independent at Bank Street.

 

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