Jump to content
madannie77

Mechanical World Year Book 1939

Recommended Posts

Some products made in Sheffield and advertised in the above mentioned publication.

Apologies for the wonky scans - I had to use a hand held scanner and my hands are not the steadiest anymore:

"Dunelt" Hollow Steel Bars from Dunford & Elliott

i-X4LLxDR.jpg

 

"Celfor" Soft Centred Steel from Sanderson Brothers & Newbould

i-w4ZgPrP.jpg

 

Precision Tools from Moore & Wright

i-QdcKpwL.jpg

 

Lots of things from John Holding & Co

i-m8QbpjV.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some more from the same book

Eclipse Hack Saw Blades from James Neill

i-hDrZtzF-X3.jpg

 

Interchangeable Steel Type from Edward Pryor & Son

i-d6fq7hN-X3.jpg

 

Springs and Spring Washers from John Tonks & Co

i-GLws4qd.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was an apprentice at Sanderson Bros & Newbould 1959 to 1965. I am sure they didn't produce Celfor soft centre steel at that time. In later life I worked setting up

 machines used for surface hardening, I am glad nobody found out about this steel as I would not have got to the countries I got to. Malaysia, South Korea, Thailand, Italy Sweden to name a few.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Madannie...very interesting and a reminder of what this city of ours once was! "Celfor", like so many other brand names from Sheffield's steel companies was a case hardening steel used for shells, gears and any number of other applications. During WW2 the Germans became the world leaders in the manufacture of these steels when the shortage of alloys made them reliant on more readily available materials and inventing new hardening techniques

. Most of these Sheffield brand names faded into insignificance ( tool and high speed steels excepted) when BS970 En series specifications became widely accepted by the steel and engineering industries .

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The hollow steel bars of round and hexagonal shape are used in the rock drilling and mining tool industry. Rock drills, sometimes 12 feet long have the hole in the so that coolant can be passed through them.

Padley & Venables in Dronfield use hexagonal hollow bar to make their rock drills. The end is forged with a slot that has a tungsten carbide tip brazed into it then 2 small holes each side of the carbide tip allow the coolant out, otherwise the tip would get so hot the carbide tip would un-braze. P&V's owners at the time bought Bedford steels on Effingham road to ensure continuity of supply after the only other rolling mill in Sheffield rolling hollow bar closed down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That company would be the "Sheffield Hollow Drill Steel Co.Ltd whose premises were , if memory serves m correct,on Locoford Lane (now the exit from IKEA}

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×