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The Moor in 1977

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Sorry, but this is nowhere near 1977.

The Moor was pedestrianised in around '74.  The Manpower Services Commission building was already being built across the bottom end of The Moor a year or two before that - maybe those cranes at the bottom of The Moor are for exactly that.

But the biggest giveaway, is the bus.  It's still in the old Sheffield Transport livery - pale cream and navy blue.  They became South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive (SYPTE), in maybe '72 or '73.  1974 at the very latest.  That's when the livery became the pale cream and dirty brown colours.

My best guess for this photo would be 1972.

The old Suggs building and covered arcade on Pinstone Street has been demolished in this photo - LHS.  Again, my guess would be 1972 for that.  But if you want to be sure, that's where to begin.

 

EDIT:  I take it all back.  MSC Building did not open until! 1981, and The Moor was last used by traffic in 1979.

In the mid 70s, as school kids, we used to catch the number 4 bus back home from Paternoster Row, sometimes we walked up to Pinstone Street, or The Moor, where we could also catch any one of the 17, 24, 81, 82, or 83 bus routes.

I was quite certain that it was during my school years that buses down The Moor began taking that ridiculous detour around Manpower Services, and then later, the full detour down Charter Row.  I later worked in the city centre for several years, and had the same choice of bus routes, so I am conflating the two periods and memories.

Edited by Craigio
Correction
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1 hour ago, Craigio said:

Sorry, but this is nowhere near 1977.

The Moor was pedestrianised in around '74.  The Manpower Services Commission building was already being built across the bottom end of The Moor a year or two before that - maybe those cranes at the bottom of The Moor are for exactly that.

But the biggest giveaway, is the bus.  It's still in the old Sheffield Transport livery - pale cream and navy blue.  They became South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive (SYPTE), in maybe '72 or '73.  1974 at the very latest.  That's when the livery became the pale cream and dirty brown colours.

My best guess for this photo would be 1972.

The old Suggs building and covered arcade on Pinstone Street has been demolished in this photo - LHS.  Again, my guess would be 1972 for that.  But if you want to be sure, that's where to begin.

Not sure what year this is but the Moor was only pedestrianized as an experiment in 1979, before being formally redeveloped. The Manpower Services building was opened in 1981 and buses were diverted around the bottom bit of the moor a few years before that.  From memory the bus repainting took many years to complete and many buses, at least at my garage (East Bank), saw their life out in Sheffield Transport colours,

Better and more precise informative is available on this earlier post regarding The Moor. I worked that Jumbo frequently and would have known and probably occasionally worked with the crew working route  75    ----------  

 

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Could this have been taken in November on the Day of the Rag procession? Heavy police presence and many people lining the street not seemingly going anywhere plus Christmas decorations along the route. The 'NO ENTRY' signs have an additional plate beneath them which may read "Except for Buses" so what looks like a procession of floats is the reason for the large turnout of spectators. Why not 1977? 

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Just noticed the Union Jack on top of Robert Brothers.

A nice touch, from the days before the loony left evolved into politically correct fascism.

I bet they didn't even get their windows put through.

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11 hours ago, Voldy said:

Could this have been taken in November on the Day of the Rag procession? Heavy police presence and many people lining the street not seemingly going anywhere plus Christmas decorations along the route. The 'NO ENTRY' signs have an additional plate beneath them which may read "Except for Buses" so what looks like a procession of floats is the reason for the large turnout of spectators. Why not 1977? 

I agree  Voldy , I think you may have it there    ,  I think Suggs moved out in 76 and here are the empty buildings around the Cambridge Arcade said to be October 77, it never seems to take them long to pull down Sheffield's nicer buildings. That zebra crossing was just below the Cambridge arcade but the only thing I can't remember is what appears to be a give way sign on the far left near the police woman. Even though I would be going up and down there almost every day I can't remember anything between Charles Street and Furnival Street that had give way markings on the road.. Perhaps someone can shed light on that?          ----------------------       http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s24079&pos=6&action=zoom&id=26532   

cambridge_arcade_77.jpg

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14 hours ago, boginspro said:

I agree  Voldy , I think you may have it there    ,  I think Suggs moved out in 76 and here are the empty buildings around the Cambridge Arcade said to be October 77, it never seems to take them long to pull down Sheffield's nicer buildings. That zebra crossing was just below the Cambridge arcade but the only thing I can't remember is what appears to be a give way sign on the far left near the police woman. Even though I would be going up and down there almost every day I can't remember anything between Charles Street and Furnival Street that had give way markings on the road.. Perhaps someone can shed light on that?          ----------------------       http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s24079&pos=6&action=zoom&id=26532   

cambridge_arcade_77.jpg

Me neither Bogins, you can also see the back of a Give Way or Stop sign on the corner.

I assume that the former Cambridge Arcade, took it's name from a previous section of Cambridge Street, which continued down on the other side of Pinstone Street.  Could this bit of Cambridge Street have been reinstated for a short period, after the Suggs/Barney Goodman buildings had been demolished?

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7 hours ago, Craigio said:

Me neither Bogins, you can also see the back of a Give Way or Stop sign on the corner.

I assume that the former Cambridge Arcade, took it's name from a previous section of Cambridge Street, which continued down on the other side of Pinstone Street.  Could this bit of Cambridge Street have been reinstated for a short period, after the Suggs/Barney Goodman buildings had been demolished?

Well spotted, I missed the sign, so perhaps not a very temporary thing like site entrance. I am sure the name of the arcade is related to Cambridge Street (previously Coal Pit Lane) but have never seen any evidence of an earlier road just where the arcade was. Pinstone Street as we know it didn't appear until after 1880 and I think the arcade was built soon after that. Up to 1960 Cambridge Street lined up just about directly with the top of the Moorhead triangle that surrounded the Crimea Monument and I may be wrong but think the addresses on that bit were Moorhead. This photo' from an earlier post probably explains better what I mean       ----------------      https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/16570-a-birds-eye-view-of-old-sheffield/?tab=comments#comment-139917             ------------------     and this other early post has some good information about the general area                ---------------------        https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/15327-68-pinstone-street-in-1881/?tab=comments#comment-131019

 

pinstonestreet.jpg

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Having taken a long hard look again my opinion is that we are being somewhat confused by the strength of the camera's ability to foreshorten the distances we are seeing. The first road junction nearest to the camera is Charles Street (on both sides of the road) and the new looking boarding on the left surrounded the site shown in the PS s24079 image (Cambridge Arcade etc.). The concrete street lighting columns would have been erected at approximately 100 foot intervals,subject to practical considerations,and if you look at their number on the original picture and how close they appear to be,that demolition site is the whole of that block of shops. That illuminated circular sign and solid white line would be a 'STOP' whilst there are double yellow lines just visible,on both photos,on the opposite side of the road corner.

Between us , we seem to be getting more of the pieces of this one sorted out and just to prove that older threads can be very useful the camera location on this one would have been near to the old Barrel Inn!

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4 hours ago, Voldy said:

Having taken a long hard look again my opinion is that we are being somewhat confused by the strength of the camera's ability to foreshorten the distances we are seeing. The first road junction nearest to the camera is Charles Street (on both sides of the road) and the new looking boarding on the left surrounded the site shown in the PS s24079 image (Cambridge Arcade etc.). The concrete street lighting columns would have been erected at approximately 100 foot intervals,subject to practical considerations,and if you look at their number on the original picture and how close they appear to be,that demolition site is the whole of that block of shops. That illuminated circular sign and solid white line would be a 'STOP' whilst there are double yellow lines just visible,on both photos,on the opposite side of the road corner.

Between us , we seem to be getting more of the pieces of this one sorted out and just to prove that older threads can be very useful the camera location on this one would have been near to the old Barrel Inn!

Thanks  Voldy . I am sure you are right. Looking at some Picture Sheffield images and Google Street View some of the frontages between Charles Street and Cambridge Street seem to make it conclusive. I think I was going too far back by only remembering the crossing being below the arcade. In both the Picture Sheffield view looking the other way and in the current Google view the crossing is up by Charles Street.  Also I couldn't work out where the bottom of Cambridge Street was in the original, but it is still very hard to see in the modern view. The camera can do funny things.  Thank again   ------------       http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?action=zoomWindow&keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;v00324&prevUrl=

 

pinstone_street_up.png

 

pinstonestreet_google.png.jpg

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After 24 hours, you beat me to it by seconds Bogins lol

I don't think there is any doubt Voldy has cracked it.

There is a lamppost right by the stop sign, and the wooden hoardings continue some distance beyond the next lamppost down.  Possibly beyond the third lamppost.  They must be a minimum of 50 yards long, probably more.

In these two photos, you can see that the modern Grovesenor House block (between Cambridge Street and Charter Square), is slightly set back, (wider pavement).  In the Moor 1977 photo, you can just see the upper floors concrete "filigrees windows" poking out beyond the older buildings (between Charles Street and Cambridge Street).  The "foreshortening" is quite startling.

The old Barrel Inn?  That's a new one on me!

Cambridge_St_s23819.jpg

Moorhead.jpg

Edited by Craigio
Correction
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