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Thorntons girl

Old Sheffield dishes

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Hi there everybody,

I am interested in any old traditional Sheffield dishes you have experienced.

Dishes Mum or Granny used to make for you?

I remember the traditional meat and two veg, fish and chips, meat and potato pie, stew, ash and dumplings, I have tried all these.

I have also heard of Tripe, Chicklings and bag and pig heads- I have never ever tried these by the way but did come home one day to find a pigs head boiling on the oven!!(Yucky)

Any more I should know of?

I would love to collect some old recepies please!!

Thank for reading, I look forward to any replies

xx

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I think you mean 'hash'—but then my schoolmates always told me I spoke posh.

I always used to like plum duff, but I haven't had it since about 1968 when I left home.

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Yorkshire pud with onion gravy.

Parkin.

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Moddies, through the wonders of technology this topic has posted itself ten times; could some of them be pruned, please?

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Used to go to the butchers to get pigs feet and pigs tails for my nan - never tried them myself, oh and she used to cook tripe.

Proper dripping, mmmmmmmmmm

Sheffield fishcakes

Someone has already said Parkin

Meat and potato pie :)

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10 minutes ago, antony said:

 

Sheffield fishcakes

 

Would those be two slices of potato, with a layer of fish in between, cooked in batter? If so, we used to get them from Furniss' fish & chip shop on Hollinsend Road and they were delicious.

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11 minutes ago, Athy said:

Would those be two slices of potato, with a layer of fish in between, cooked in batter? If so, we used to get them from Furniss' fish & chip shop on Hollinsend Road and they were delicious.

Yup, thats them - the proper ones lol (I can hear the tin of worms about fishcakes being opened)

Mum and Dad still get them in a breadcake from the chippy at Manor top. Bit of Hendersons on them mmmmmmmmm

Cant get them where I am :(

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Dripping cakes - blummin' delicious things!!! You can feel your arteries hardening as you eat them.  I get my fix from Emma's Deli at Stannington served on Lilly's (bakers on Penistone Road) breadcakes.

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Not a recipe as such Thornton's girl.   The mother of one of our family friends would regularly cook cows udder, this would be sliced and used as a sandwich filling, not much flavor to it though! i would cover mine in brown sauce,  mum always gave me one of those disapproving looks (early 50s).

 

 

 

 

I

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9 hours ago, Athy said:

Would those be two slices of potato, with a layer of fish in between, cooked in batter? If so, we used to get them from Furniss' fish & chip shop on Hollinsend Road and they were delicious.

Up to 1970 we timed our journies from and to Lincoln to pass the chip shop on the High Street at Swallownest when they were open. They did a very good proper fishcake. Sometime later we found a local chippie at Saxilby just outside Lincoln  that sold them to the Sheffield weekend anglers who knew what they were  and to the natives who didn't. The owner was not surprisingly a Sheffield expat. We sat in the car and ate them out of the paper; they were marvellous. Then he spoilt it by retiring in the 1980's and it wasn't the same after that. 

Then to Grandma's variation, seasoned  pudding; Yorkshire pudding with thyme and parsley stirred into the mixture. For some reason this was always served first  as about a 4" square with a similar one of ordinary Yorkshire pudding with gravy.  Meat and veg then on the same plate. 

 I see tripe gets honourable mention. Grandma coming from a Debyshire farming family knew what to do. Father would regale us with stories of going to the slaughterhouse when they lived at Hedley during WW1 to collect a cow's stomach. His next task was then to clean out all the grass content and wash it out.  That put me off it permanently. Grandparents and parents all ate it either with vinegar or as tripe and onions boiled in milk. So did my wife. To me it seemed like chewing a rubber mat so I stuck to a cheese sandwich and looked on as they enjoyed it.

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Well fried potato cakes made up from Sunday's leftover mashed spuds with lots of salt and vinegar.... Sometimes with the addition of yesterdays boiled cabbage... but I was never keen on the green stuff:o. We must have been "rich" but we never had offal although black pudding was always enjoyed and my Mum also did "soused" herrings...although as she came from Grimsby I am not sure if it was a dish local to Sheffield or not. During, and just after, WW2 we always enjoyed Mock Salmon...which I think was taken from one of Wilton's wartime recipes.

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11 hours ago, Keith_exS10 said:

 

Then to Grandma's variation, seasoned  pudding; Yorkshire pudding with thyme and parsley stirred into the mixture. For some reason this was always served first  as about a 4" square with a similar one of ordinary Yorkshire pudding with gravy.  Meat and veg then on the same plate. 

 

I think this was the "traditional" way of serving Yorkie Pud. The idea was, it was cheap to make and it was filling, so family wolfed it down and had less stomach room left for the more expensive meat, which could therefore be served in smaller portions!

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23 hours ago, Athy said:

I think this was the "traditional" way of serving Yorkie Pud. The idea was, it was cheap to make and it was filling, so family wolfed it down and had less stomach room left for the more expensive meat, which could therefore be served in smaller portions!

Thanks for that. I had thought it might be that originally

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Not forgetting  RABBIT STEW. I remember them hung outside the butchers shop complete with fur, I read they don't do this anymore because it scares the kids and no one wants the job of skinning them anyway.   

STEW & DUMPLINGS . I still love stew and dumplings but I remember when   I was young my elder brother came home from Malaya where he had been during his army years and he brought some curry powder home with him. He finally persuaded my mother to put it in the stew telling us all we would love it, not ever having heard of the word curry we gave it a try, yuk none of us liked it and it spoilt a good pan of stew. I still don't like curry to this day.

LENTIL SOUP. Every mother did a big pan of lentil soup for the family consisting of turnips , carrots, onions , red lentils and bacon pig ribs. the meat just used to fall off the bones when cooked. You can't get the bacon bones today because they all seem to be pork ribs [ unsalted ] that go to make bbq ribs and Chinese ribs.

CORNED BEEF PLATE PIE. This is my favourite, mother used to make a large plate pie short crust pastry on the top and bottom filled with mashed potato, onions and chopped up corned  beef . The recipe has been passed down the family and my daughter still makes it, it can be eaten hot or cold. On the other hand you can have CORNED BEEF HASH that's more or less the same but without the pastry.

TRIPE & ONIONS . Which I would never eat, the thought of boiling tripe and onions in milk, yuk, but I love tripe or cow heel pieces with salt and vinegar although they don't taste the same anymore, all you can taste is cleaning fluids.

MEAT & POTATO PIE. You can't beat home made meat and potato pie with Sheffield Henderson's Relish

STEAMED STEAK & KIDNEY PIE.  I love this steamed suet pudding although it takes a long time, I put it in the basin and cover it with foil and put it in the crock pot for a few hours, yummy. I also like a kidney on my pork chop but the butchers say are not allowed to sell them together even though they grow together, they have to cut them off and sell them separately.:rolleyes:

BUBBLE & SQUEAK.  All the left overs from yesterdays usually Sundays dinner fried up in the pan, we used to put piccalilli on it.

FRENCH TOAST. I don't know if this did come from France but that's what we used to call it and there are different versions to this, ours were partly toasted as to warm bread so the margarine would melt in then we would sprinkle on the sugar and eat.

HOME MADE RICE PUDDING. Mother used to put it in the oven and half way through cooking she would take it out and stir in some treacle [ golden syrup and pop it back in until it produced a lovely brown skin on top, we all used to fight over the skin as to who got the biggest piece .

HOME MADE BREAD, Another delight, couldn't wait until it cooled we had to get the marge on to let it melt in. [ Couldn't afford butter.]

BLACK PUDDING. Black pudding had to have little pieces of fat in it or it wasn't the same.  I liked it warm with Henderson's Relish on but I haven't had any for years . I've slowly gone off it.

CHICKERLINGS  & BAG.  You don't see this much today either, the last time I had some many years ago all you could taste were cleaning fluids again.

BRAWN . How I hated it but you can still buy it today.

POLONY.  I used to like this but very hard to find today, bet it doesn't taste the same.

Are you ready to order?lol

 

 

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2 hours ago, ukelele lady said:

Not forgetting  RABBIT STEW. I remember them hung outside the butchers shop complete with fur, I read they don't do this anymore because it scares the kids and no one wants the job of skinning them anyway.  

 

The rabbits used to have a cup fastened on their heads, so the blood didn't drip onto passers-by underneath.

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Ukelele lady and rabbits stirred .memories. The Hounslow family had a shop on Middlewood Road opposite the Barracks entrance, principally a greengrocers I understand.

During WW1 my mother aged twelve went regularly across the road with a basket selling fruit to the troops. Her other contribution to the business from about age ten which she delighted in telling us about  in detail was her ability to carefully skin and clean rabbits and then hang them on a rail ready for sale.  To complete the job the skins were neatly folded and bundled and regularly taken on the tram to a furrier  in the Town centre. Grandma's final instruction was "And don't come back without getting sixpence apiece for them"

Not sure about the kids not liking it, my wife was quite put off in middle age when mother demonstrated she could still do it. 

 

 

 

Quote

 

 

 

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On ‎15‎/‎02‎/‎2018 at 12:20, Athy said:

Would those be two slices of potato, with a layer of fish in between, cooked in batter? If so, we used to get them from Furniss' fish & chip shop on Hollinsend Road and they were delicious.

Are there any other type?

Does anyone remember the fishcakes from Lomas's chip shop at Darnall? The difference being that the fish between the two slices of potato appeared to be minced with herbs (rather than being flakes of fish) giving a very distinctive flavour. Never had them like that from anywhere else.

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As a young un I remember on a Saturday we used to go to my Grandmas, and she used to cook a MASSIVE square yorkshire pudding in her Yorkshire range oven, then she would cut it into smaller squares and I recall having it with gravy, but also the thing I remember the most was having it with Golden syrup for afters,sometimes we also had sugar/Jam on it.     Heaven on a plate.

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Yes, my Mum never served it like that but I had it at other people's houses.

After all, it's the same mixture as pancakes, which can be eaten savoury or sweet.

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Hi Thorntons girl, on reading the replies you've had, oh! the memories of lovely food came flooding back.

Mum did small Round Crispy Yorkshire Puds with every Sunday dinner, but my Mum-in-law did large Tea-Plate size ones we had as a 'Pudding with Raspberry Jam'.

When I was little there was a Butchers, opposite side to Atkinson's, but further down towards Moor foot, near a pub that had tiled outside walls 'The Anchor' ??  it was in the row of 'Old Buildings' with the cattle Market at the back. Mum would call in there after shopping on a Saturday before we got the bus home, and buy 'TOMATO SAUSAGES'. Cor! they were lovely, we had them for tea with baked beanz and mash. ( don't know if anyone still makes them )

And yes, I have to agree that 'YORKSHIRE FISHCAKES' are the best, and biggest. A real treat was eating a hot Fishcake, in it's paper.Yummmy! I had to explain to a guy why our Fishcakes were different to other ones, when I told him it was, Flaked White Fish, sandwhiched between Sliced Potato, then Deep fried in Golden Crispy Batter, his mouth was positively drooling.

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Loved Sheffield fishcakes used to have them with scraps n salt and vinegar. I used to peel the batter off first, then eat the potato the the fish. Just loved em.

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Heartshome has evoked another memory - tomato sausages! These days of course you wouldn't be permitted to sell them under that name, as the tomato wasn't the main ingredient, but I have a fond memory of them. Then, when I was 9 or 10 years old, someone told my Mum that the tomato sausages were of lower quality than beef or pork ones and had all the left-overs in (I am not sure how true this was) and the miserable cow stopped buying them.

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Just talking to my friend about the 'childhood food memories' and she just mentioned ' Rissoles' I'd forgotten about those, they looked like a little fat burger, with either minced meat or fish seasoned and pan fried in bread crumbs. We would have them with peas and home made chips.Lovely!

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Tater and Onions on a Wednesday it was just Potato and Onions with oxo gravy simmered .I am sure it was because it was the day before payday and it was the only thing left in the pantry 

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Thanks everyone for contributing, what an amazing menu of food we have and do eat in Sheffield.

Someone should write a book.

I loved the fishcakes, the fish and chips, rissoles, meat and potato pie but I am not sure about tripe and Chitlings and bag.

What food do we eat today that compare to these tasty morsals?

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