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Hello again,

I was wondering whether anyone knows where the anti aircraft gun sites were situated in sheffield during WWII.Has a map been produced showing where they were situated?

Regards

Ron

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dunsbyowl1867

Hello again,

I was wondering whether anyone knows where the anti aircraft gun sites were situated in sheffield during WWII.Has a map been produced showing where they were situated?

Regards

Ron

A couple of photos from "Sheffield at War". The caption below the bottom photo suggests there were 3 rocket sites. One was at Shirecliffe.

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Thanks alot for the reply. I assume that before the rocket sites were introduced there would have been a number of Heavy anti aircraft batteries with 3.7 inch guns as elsewhere around the country.

Thanks

Ron

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Hi Ron

There was an AA battery on the playing fields at High Storrs School. There were three 3.7s and one 4.7 naval ack-ack, plus a range finder manned by ATS personnel, and a search-light. An eye-witness who talked to the gunners was told that in Sheffield this was the only site with a 4.7 naval gun.

Someone has done an overlay for Google Earth with all the sites marked. There was a link on the Sheffield Forum some time ago. Here are the map references for the sites in and near Sheffield. The placenames are approximate but the references are accurate, taken from a book called AA Command by C. Dobinson, published a couple of years ago.

Near Ringinglow SK296 832

Shirecliffe SK351 897

Burngreave SK360 895

Loxley SK313 890

Near Norton SK 360 815 and SK363 815

Chapeltown SK352 956

Parson Cross SK347 931

Grenoside SK324 936

High Bradfield SK273 937

High Green SK321 964

If you can find the overlay all the sites in the UK are marked, along with Starfish etc.

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  • 2 months later...

 

Dunsbyowl said:
A couple of photos from "Sheffield at War". The caption below the bottom photo suggests there were 3 rocket sites. One was at Shirecliffe.

 

There was one at the top of what is now the ski slope, at Parkwood Springs, there were a series of concrete bunkers used to play in them as kids, can just remember the wooden huts that presumably housed the soldiers, i'm sure there was mention of a heavy gun being there.

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There's a wartime book been republished called 'Roof over Britain, the official story of the AA defences 1939-1942'. Although it doesn't mention Sheffield has some good illustrations of equipment and descriptions of how sites were laid out. I picked up a copy from Postscript Books (google for the address) , cost me less than a fiver, plus postage of course!

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I'm sure I remember some concrete emplacements on the top of Wincobank Hill (but I haven't been up there for 50 years).

My father told me that he was attached to 131 battery HG Heavy Anti Aircraft Battery at Norton. As far as I can make out this was either as a cadet from Dronfield Grammar School cadet corps, or as a member of the Home Guard at Bradway. Unfortunately, he's not around to ask for clarification.

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Guest Carveti

Hello again,

I was wondering whether anyone knows where the anti aircraft gun sites were situated in sheffield during WWII.Has a map been produced showing where they were situated?

Regards

Ron

I believe there was a site on the outer perimeter of Ecclesfield Comp. playing fields, above what is known locally as "the quarry".

There was also a gun-site on the field by the side of Ecclesfield Road, near the junction with Grange Lane. We used to play in the "trenches" back in the 60s.

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I believe there was a site on the outer perimeter of Ecclesfield Comp. playing fields, above what is known locally as "the quarry".

There was also a gun-site on the field by the side of Ecclesfield Road, near the junction with Grange Lane. We used to play in the "trenches" back in the 60s.

Welcome to the Site, mooch around, find stuff, ask questions, post stuff - enjoy ...

If only we had a bunch of "old-ish" maps and some people that knew what they were doing...

<Sigh>.

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Keith_exS10
On 20/06/2007 at 20:56, Bayleaf said:

Hi Ron

There was an AA battery on the playing fields at High Storrs School. There were three 3.7s and one 4.7 naval ack-ack, plus a range finder manned by ATS personnel, and a search-light. An eye-witness who talked to the gunners was told that in Sheffield this was the only site with a 4.7 naval gun.

Someone has done an overlay for Google Earth with all the sites marked. There was a link on the Sheffield Forum some time ago. Here are the map references for the sites in and near Sheffield. The placenames are approximate but the references are accurate, taken from a book called AA Command by C. Dobinson, published a couple of years ago.

Near Ringinglow SK296 832

Shirecliffe SK351 897

Burngreave SK360 895

Loxley SK313 890

Near Norton SK 360 815 and SK363 815

Chapeltown SK352 956

Parson Cross SK347 931

Grenoside SK324 936

High Bradfield SK273 937

High Green SK321 964

 

If you can find the overlay all the sites in the UK are marked, along with Starfish etc.

As a pupil at High Storrs from 1942 to 1949 I was intrigued by Bayleafs comments   As an Old Centralian my father hoped I would make it there and moved to Banner Cross in 1939. That gave us chance to occasionally get the 28 bus and then walk home along Ringinglow Road.  Looking across the top field to the left there looked to be anti aircraft guns pointing toward the city. What we wondered was the horizontal fine mesh screen which covered the whole 100 yards length of the cricket field  and extended  to the groundsman's big shed.  In the middle was a sort of small observation post with no obvious  way in or sign of life. There was a war on,  it probably had to do with defence and you just didn't ask. 

Comes the 1942 exams and I made it to Form 1 with a view over the field. The mesh contraption had gone without trace but we could see guns in the distance. In the dinner hour we were usually allowed on the bottom football fields. After a while several of us set off to have a close look and got a shock. Plywood replicas. Just them, no sign ofany army buildings  except the genuine gun enclosures. They looked realistic from the road and probably from overhead. .In truth by then there was not much aerial activity and gas mask and shelter drills were things of the past. After another year and even the decoys had gone.

I have no doubt  they were genuine at the beginning of the war but as usual ideas changed and about this time there was a major redistribution. I suspect the inhabitants of Bents Green Road would be relieved as the guns were only just  across the road  on the waste ground. The reference to a naval anti aircraft gun is interesting. It would be the 4.7" design from the mid  twenties. The army had some and these  were passed back to the navy at about this time.

 For those who are still looking in there is a sting in the tail.  Leaving in 1949,  I did the mandatory year in industry before going to St. George's Square. The war  was far away.  then National Service in the R.E.M.E. It was decided  I would go for trade training which ultimately took up some fourteen months. First day in the training workshop : "This is a 3.7 anti aircraft  gun and you lot are going to take it apart and put it back again"  We were used to cranes.  "No cranes in the desert"  We were actually in deepest Hampshire but we were trained in a continuous worst case situation. The plywood decoys were no preparation. There were some horrible lumps to heave about, the biggest  needing eight of us and even  then we put it down a bit too quick. . I suppose typically soon after we had seen the latest 4.7 auto loader being made at Woolwich Arsenal  Anti  Aircraft Command was abolished.

Overall it made up for not having the real thing on the High Storrs  fields but  I still don't know what the mesh screen was for. As civilian photography was  banned ( there weren't  any films anrway) unless someone gets into M.O.D. archives that will be the end of that

.

 

 

 

 

 

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