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Arif

Both sides of the City Hall

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With a number of threads on the City Hall I thought I'd add another one myself! These two scans are from my ever increasing collection of postcards featuring Sheffield and its environs. I've scanned them quite high so that they make a reasonable download. Had a great time in the City Hall as a youth but that ones been done to death I should imagine. Neither card has been posted so there are no dates to go by. I'll let you experts work that one out. Enjoy.

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30 minutes ago, Sheffield History said:



Amazing photos thank you 

You are welcome!

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Great images, the gardens were peaceful then, and not seen before, but as for date.

Looking at the cars parked behind the garden wall, we seem to have a Morris Minor (which of course is timeless), possibly a Standard 10 (third from left), then a Mini, and a then, possibly an Austin-Morris 1100 Hatch-back, or similar and then, a Ford Anglia 105E. So, I would guess middle to late sixties.

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I spy the gardeners hoe and jacket.

I have to admit, I don't think I've ever walked through or sat in the garden. I cant even think how similar or different it is today?

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My grandfather, Edward George Bell, was the first, residential Manager of the City Hall from 1931 - 1953. He and his wife and young daughter, Olive Bell (my mother), moved into their flat at the top of the building on 8th December 1931, one year prior to its completion and opening, so as to oversee the final works and fitting out. The family were there throughout the Sheffield Blitz. My mother lived there until her marriage in 1941 but also stayed there with her parents during the war, when my father was on active service in the RAF.

After the war our family were rehoused into a prefab in Dore but I have many happy memories of visiting the City Hall with my parents and brother and sister, entering by a small side door and climbing the staircase to the flat at the top to see my Nana and Grandad Bell. When they retired they were rehoused into a council house at Greenhill and a few months later, the family having outgrown the prefab, our family were also rehoused, into a house in the next street.

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8 hours ago, stevehoyland said:

My grandfather, Edward George Bell, was the first, residential Manager of the City Hall from 1931 - 1953.

Mr Bell was involved with an organ wireless concert transmitted from the City Hall in early 1934:

5a604bcd29a17_WirelessConcert1934.png.f038f2eb8cd36b34cfe2f761746f7ca4.png

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10 hours ago, stevehoyland said:

My grandfather, Edward George Bell, was the first, residential Manager of the City Hall from 1931 - 1953. He and his wife and young daughter, Olive Bell (my mother), moved into their flat at the top of the building on 8th December 1931, one year prior to its completion and opening, so as to oversee the final works and fitting out. The family were there throughout the Sheffield Blitz. My mother lived there until her marriage in 1941 but also stayed there with her parents during the war, when my father was on active service in the RAF.

After the war our family were rehoused into a prefab in Dore but I have many happy memories of visiting the City Hall with my parents and brother and sister, entering by a small side door and climbing the staircase to the flat at the top to see my Nana and Grandad Bell. When they retired they were rehoused into a council house at Greenhill and a few months later, the family having outgrown the prefab, our family were also rehoused, into a house in the next street.

A brilliant bit of family history Steve thank you.

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10 hours ago, stevehoyland said:

My grandfather, Edward George Bell, was the first, residential Manager of the City Hall from 1931 - 1953. He and his wife and young daughter, Olive Bell (my mother), moved into their flat at the top of the building on 8th December 1931, one year prior to its completion and opening, so as to oversee the final works and fitting out. The family were there throughout the Sheffield Blitz. My mother lived there until her marriage in 1941 but also stayed there with her parents during the war, when my father was on active service in the RAF.

After the war our family were rehoused into a prefab in Dore but I have many happy memories of visiting the City Hall with my parents and brother and sister, entering by a small side door and climbing the staircase to the flat at the top to see my Nana and Grandad Bell. When they retired they were rehoused into a council house at Greenhill and a few months later, the family having outgrown the prefab, our family were also rehoused, into a house in the next street.

A postcard showing the City Hall as it opened. Your grandfather would have been here then I presume.

City Hall a.jpg

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On ‎17‎/‎01‎/‎2018 at 22:31, stevehoyland said:

My grandfather, Edward George Bell, was the first, residential Manager of the City Hall from 1931 - 1953. He and his wife and young daughter, Olive Bell (my mother), moved into their flat at the top of the building on 8th December 1931, one year prior to its completion and opening, so as to oversee the final works and fitting out. The family were there throughout the Sheffield Blitz. My mother lived there until her marriage in 1941 but also stayed there with her parents during the war, when my father was on active service in the RAF.

After the war our family were rehoused into a prefab in Dore but I have many happy memories of visiting the City Hall with my parents and brother and sister, entering by a small side door and climbing the staircase to the flat at the top to see my Nana and Grandad Bell. When they retired they were rehoused into a council house at Greenhill and a few months later, the family having outgrown the prefab, our family were also rehoused, into a house in the next street.

My uncle, Frank Gummer was manager of the City Hall. I don't know when he started but he was manager in 1962 and retired in 1976. he too lived in the flat. I recall well going to see him in his office to get free tickets for pop concerts in the 60's and 70's. It sure was a climb upstairs to his flat and interestingly he had a dog which he used to let out of the flat for it to take itself a walk. It was completely street wise and well known in the local shops. Not very PC now because of dog muck etc and certainly wouldn't happen these days.

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On 18/01/2018 at 09:23, Arif said:

A postcard showing the City Hall as it opened. Your grandfather would have been here then I presume.

City Hall a.jpg

Yes, he was there - it opened in September 1932.  He had a very dapper commisionaire's uniform for such formal occasions - don't have any photos of him at that particular event but do have a photo of him dressed in the uniform when Anthony Eden (Conservative politician and later Prime Minister) addressed a meeting at the City Hall in November 1948.

 

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14 hours ago, Wallsy said:

My uncle, Frank Gummer was manager of the City Hall. I don't know when he started but he was manager in 1962 and retired in 1976. he too lived in the flat. I recall well going to see him in his office to get free tickets for pop concerts in the 60's and 70's. It sure was a climb upstairs to his flat and interestingly he had a dog which he used to let out of the flat for it to take itself a walk. It was completely street wise and well known in the local shops. Not very PC now because of dog muck etc and certainly wouldn't happen these days.

Yes, I'm pretty sure that Frank was my grandfather's assistant for a number of years (if my Mum was still alive she would definitely be able to confirm this) and when he finally retired in 1953 he recommended Frank to the Town Clerk as his successor. Later comment added: I have now found Frank online on the 1939 Register where the formal title of his then occupation is listed as "City Hall Attendant - Charge Hand". So he was definitely working under my grandfather at that time. His home address is listed as 27 Tillotson Road. 

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19 hours ago, stevehoyland said:

Yes, I'm pretty sure that Frank was my grandfather's assistant for a number of years (if my Mum was still alive she would definitely be able to confirm this) and when he finally retired in 1953 he recommended Frank to the Town Clerk as his successor. Later comment added: I have now found Frank online on the 1939 Register where the formal title of his then occupation is listed as "City Hall Attendant - Charge Hand". So he was definitely working under my grandfather at that time. His home address is listed as 27 Tillotson Road. 

That sounds familiar now you mention it, on both points. I believe previous he had worked at the Hippodrome. I have recordings of his interviews on Radio Sheffield back in the late late 60's early 70's, I'll have to listen to them again. Thanks for your information. 

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In the mid 60's the City Hall manager was Mr Gummer. He was a friend of my Dad and a fine man. He used to give my brother and me free tickets, consequently I saw the Rolling Stones, the Animals, the Seachers, Joan Baez, Jimi Hendricks, the Drifters and many more. My late brother John saw Bob Dylan and the Beatles all down to Mr Gummer. There were also the big screen film shows at the City Hall in the mid 60's. My friend Rob Lancaster and I went with my Dad's friend Stan Cooper to see the Africa natural history show, it was a wonderful experience. On the way out , Stan Cooper tapped a woman on the shoulder and said, 'Excuse me Mrs, but you've got a bat on your back!' Something that always comes back to me when ever I walk down those steps. Stan Cooper was the Lord Mayor's Mace Bearer, he was a real charactor always up to something ridiculous. He lived at Loxley, does anybody remember him? He had a son called Philip who went to the Art College, I'd love to se Philip again after all these years, he was also a MASSIVE Rolling Stones fan. Wazzie Worrall.

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