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Sheffield Victoria Train Station

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14188520_1127159774031901_4983653380800751734_o.jpg

Absolutely love this photo of the old Sheffield Victoria Train Station and the adjacent hotel in Sheffield city centre.

Looks like a rainy day in the steel city judging by the clouds and the wet road, and not many cars kicking about either.

Did anyone use this station? Was it open at the time of the current train station that we have today?

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4 hours ago, Sheffield History said:

14188520_1127159774031901_4983653380800751734_o.jpg

Absolutely love this photo of the old Sheffield Victoria Train Station and the adjacent hotel in Sheffield city centre.

Looks like a rainy day in the steel city judging by the clouds and the wet road, and not many cars kicking about either.

Did anyone use this station? Was it open at the time of the current train station that we have today?

Victoria opened in 1851 as part of an extension of the Sheffield, Ashton-under-Lyne & Manchester Railway (which previously terminated at Bridgehouses station), and eventually closed early in 1970. 

I believe trains serving the route to Penistone continued to pass through Victoria (without stopping) till some time in the 1980s however, reversing to go down the ramp to Midland station - a hassle which was eventually cancelled out by the reopening of the line from Barnsley to Penistone as exists today. 

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3 hours ago, Sheffield History said:


Thank you 

It's such a shame to lose this station and line

Indeed, my dad says that too - he remembers it operating, very well. 

The line which still survives through the site, is the old goods avoiding line. Which is used for the Stocksbridge Steel Works trains, for the moment at least. 

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The clock tower must have been demolished quite early before the rest of the station buildings. There's a photo of the same front in 1981 and it's not there then.

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The station remained reasonably intact, post closure for many years, and if I remember rightly, was temporarily reopened late in 1976, in order to facilitate the electrification of the points and signalling systems at Sheffield Midland Station, following which, it closed once again. However, shortly after the electrification scheme was completed, Sheffield Midland Station was flooded out, when the River Porter breached its banks, and the new points and signals were rendered useless. So, Victoria Station reopened again, as a temporary solution, and remained in use until such time that the wiring had been dried out. That was early January 1977.

The attached photograph, taken by me on a snowy day on 06/01/1977, shows a Sheffield Victoria bound D.M.U. at Woodhouse Station. I caught this train, which was on the Lincoln to Sheffield service in order to arrive at Sheffield Victoria.

WRS024-Woodhouse (GCR) Station-(D.M.U.)-06-01-1977.jpg

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I remember as a kid we used to go on day trips by train to Cleethorpes We always set off from the Midland station but the train nearly always returned to Victoria, which meant a long walk to the bus station in Pond Street!

Nigel L

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Did a few similar trips with Woodhouse Working Men' Club, but departing and arriving from Woodhouse, though I do remember a few departing from Sheffield Victoria as well, but I don't recall as to whether we returned to the self-same point of departure, but I was very young as the time. Those that I recall departing from Sheffield Midland were normally westward bound, Belle Vue and Colwyn Bay, I think. Do you remember the luggage labels that they used to tie into your top button-hole? No high-viz jackets for little-uns then!

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I suspect that Sheffield History was teasing us with his question, but just in case he isn't, yes, the Vicoria and Midland stations were open concurrently for many years, and yes, quite a lot of people used it - as, from memory, did many carrier pigeons.

Victoria no doubt experienced a great increase in traffic after the London Extension of the line was opened in 1897, enabling trains to go to the new terminus at Marylebone.

But what I don't remember is that facade - the only entrance to Victoria which I recall was through a sort of tunnel or underpass. You got to it by walking along the road from the Midland Station for maybe three-quarters of a mile (perhaps it was less, but my kegs were shorter then), then turning right.  It's possible that the facade may have been demolished, but the Morris Minor Traveller parked outside suggests that the snap dates from the late '50s at the earliest.and that's when I started to go train-spotting there. So, were there two entrances to the station from different sides?

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1 hour ago, Athy said:

But what I don't remember is that facade - the only entrance to Victoria which I recall was through a sort of tunnel or underpass. You got to it by walking along the road from the Midland Station for maybe three-quarters of a mile (perhaps it was less, but my kegs were shorter then), then turning right.  It's possible that the facade may have been demolished, but the Morris Minor Traveller parked outside suggests that the snap dates from the late '50s at the earliest.and that's when I started to go train-spotting there. So, were there two entrances to the station from different sides?

I think your memory is correct, here's a map showing the subway.  But it's not clear to someone who never used it what the actual arrangement and approach was.

 

59cfa99719b2f_VictoriaStationSubway.png.42933a7c28330358161689a28406648e.png

But maybe it's this you remember - links to photos of steps through a tunnel: Picture Sheffield Victoria Steps and  Picture Sheffield Wicker entrance , though I can't see it on this map:

59cfac8ec2c8e_VictoriaStation-Wicker.png.c7cc0d83aba7e417d6e54f36a0f68fa4.png

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From what I remember, the station, from the forecourt, had a very plain façade, and if you take away the clock tower, which I must admit, I don't remember, then it is a very plain façade indeed. Unlike the façade to the Midland Station, which is quite elegant. Once you entered into the main booking hall at Victoria, the steps down to the subway were directly in front of you, and gave access to the other, island platforms, but you generally entered the station, at least from the 'hotel access road' at road level, not by subway. If I remember rightly, and I might not, after so many years, the distinctive war memorial was on the wall opposing the forecourt entrance, and on the same wall, and alongside where the subway steps descended. There were other entrances to this station, the one that I best recall being that from by the Wicker Arches, which I never used on a regular basis, but did seem, to involve access through a short 'tunnel' and then ascent to platform level by a flight of quite steep steps.

I see that the above maps also show that there was a footbridge at the western end of the station, but honestly, I don't remember this at all, and certainly cannot remember ever having used it.

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The maps and photos are helpful, thanks. I have found a version of one of the maps which shows a bit more of the area, and which appear sto confirm that what I and my train-spotting friends used to use was the "back entrance". We would walk from the Mid. along Sheaf Street (which may have become The Wicker at some point), turn right into Furnival Street which led to the entrance which we used. I vaguely recall a road in the area with the name Blonk Street, which we found highly amusing.

I don't remember the steps, and I am not sure if we got from platform to platform using a subway or the bridge. Perhaps the bridge was for the use of staff only, I can't remember. But I am sure of one thing: we never knew that there was another, main entrance to the Vic., and we certainly never used it.

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Could this thread please be linked to the earlier one  i,e. 

 

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Thanks for that link, Voldy. I don't think I have seen that one, I'll have a look now.

EDIT: Oh yes I had, and in fact contributed to it!

I have contacted my former train-spotting friend who reckons that we DID use that main entrance - this amazes me as I don't remember the frontage as being as "open" as that.

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On 30/09/2017 at 14:31, Athy said:

I suspect that Sheffield History was teasing us with his question, but just in case he isn't, yes, the Vicoria and Midland stations were open concurrently for many years, and yes, quite a lot of people used it - as, from memory, did many carrier pigeons.

Victoria no doubt experienced a great increase in traffic after the London Extension of the line was opened in 1897, enabling trains to go to the new terminus at Marylebone.

But what I don't remember is that facade - the only entrance to Victoria which I recall was through a sort of tunnel or underpass. You got to it by walking along the road from the Midland Station for maybe three-quarters of a mile (perhaps it was less, but my kegs were shorter then), then turning right.  It's possible that the facade may have been demolished, but the Morris Minor Traveller parked outside suggests that the snap dates from the late '50s at the earliest.and that's when I started to go train-spotting there. So, were there two entrances to the station from different sides?

We used Victoria Station from 1939 through the war till my parents went south about 1965. That  view never changed while l knew it.

 What l suspect  many people did not appreciate that it was built on a viaduct, ground level being the Wicker some 45 feet below  If you stood on the far platform No.5 you realised you were looking at roof tops, so no access that side. The central building by the clock tower was the booking and enquiry office. The main entrance was straight up and through the entrance on the right..The other entrance  was from the Wicker where you had a choice. For a penny then you could take the to lift to a  level walkway  Otherwise starting from the same point there was a tunnel leading to a long flight of steps up to to the walkway which then took you past behind the Royal Vic  with a view down into the kitchens. Into the side entrance, down a short flight of stairs and  into the booking hall below the clock tower. Much luggage and a look at the steps and the lift won every time.

The entrance floor sloped down to go under the tracks with one flight up to each side of the station, no other public access. As noted there was an overbridge with lifts which was for the staff to move goods barrows from one side to the other. As l found out when l arrived from Loughborough with an elderly motorcycle l was told in no uncertain terms that as it had a ticket, ("Motorcyle 224lbs or less") it had a life of its own. It disappeared from platform No. 3 down to the parcels  office with an entrance on the right hand side of Furnival Road by the tunnel entrance.  lf l then walked down the station approach and back along Furnival Road l would be re-united with it on handing over it's  ticket. And no, it was not possible to go down with it. I see elsewhere   the Wicker lift was designated  as " Passenger lift  No. 2".  Could the Goods lift between platforms  ever have been No.1? 

The station approach looks as quiet as it usually did, just a few people waiting for trains. My one regret is that l was unable to photograph one one of it's busiest days when it was full of army buses collecting several hundred Italian P.O.W.s , the first contingent  for Redmires Camp, but that is for another thread.

 

 

 

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On 9/30/2017 at 14:31, Athy said:

I suspect that Sheffield History was teasing us with his question, but just in case he isn't, yes, the Vicoria and Midland stations were open concurrently for many years, and yes, quite a lot of people used it - as, from memory, did many carrier pigeons.

Victoria no doubt experienced a great increase in traffic after the London Extension of the line was opened in 1897, enabling trains to go to the new terminus at Marylebone.

But what I don't remember is that facade - the only entrance to Victoria which I recall was through a sort of tunnel or underpass. You got to it by walking along the road from the Midland Station for maybe three-quarters of a mile (perhaps it was less, but my kegs were shorter then), then turning right.  It's possible that the facade may have been demolished, but the Morris Minor Traveller parked outside suggests that the snap dates from the late '50s at the earliest.and that's when I started to go train-spotting there. So, were there two entrances to the station from different sides?

 

I think that is a Hillman Imp to the right. If so then the photo should be after 1963.

I used the station quite regularly around that time going to Doncaster for train-spotting, great days out and what memories. However, I can't comment on the clock tower as I always used the steep steps from the Wicker rather than the station approach from Blonk Street. The entrance to the steps (and lift) is still there but now boarded up - behind the black barred gates behind the Audi. Sorry, not sure how to include the google maps picture other than via link

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.3882477,-1.4611776,3a,15y,147h,90t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sb9A57kVUnBfhx-X6OQHHUw!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo3.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3Db9A57kVUnBfhx-X6OQHHUw%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D147.464%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i13312!8i6656

 

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Ah yes, a day return to Donny and, depending on what mood the station staff were in that day, we'd either roam the platforms or stand on the footbridge to watch the ex-L.N.E.R. locos hauling their trains or shunting about. The most thrilling moments came when a deep-throated whistle sounded from some distance away and all the train-spotters would say in unison "Streak!"

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In memory of happier days, train spotting at Sheffield Victoria, I thought that I would share the attached photograph of east-bound Class B1, No.1228, (later B.R. No.61228), approaching Sheffield Victoria station from across the Wicker Viaduct, on a sunny 'summer's' day, on the 27th September 1947. The viaduct parapets can be seen to either side of the train, and are denoted by the two black arrows. No.1228, was built by the North British Locomotive Company Limited, Glasgow, to works number 26129, and had been delivered new to Leicester M.P.D., on Sunday, 28/08/1947. So, on the date that this photograph was taken, she was just about one month's old. She was subsequently reallocated, by way of Gorton, March, Ipswich, and Norwich, to Darnall M.P.D., on Sunday, 17/01/1960, and was withdrawn from there, on Sunday 16/09/1962, at roughly fourteen years of age.

I know that few of us were train-spotting in 1947, but this scene is still very reminiscent of the visits that many of us would have made there in the 1960's, albeit, without the train being framed by the electric gantries that were very characteristic of this line by that time.

CAIMF357-NBLG.26129-1947, Class B1, No.1228-(B.R. No.61228) at Sheffield Victoria-(West End)-27-09-1947.jpg

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On ‎23‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 12:15, Athy said:

Ah yes, a day return to Donny and, depending on what mood the station staff were in that day, we'd either roam the platforms or stand on the footbridge to watch the ex-L.N.E.R. locos hauling their trains or shunting about. The most thrilling moments came when a deep-throated whistle sounded from some distance away and all the train-spotters would say in unison "Streak!"

For the benefit of those younger readers who don't know what a "Streak" was, here are a couple, caught heading southbound at Doncaster on 03/11/1961.

Unusual to find two of these locomotives running in tandam like this, but no.60005, 'Sir Charles Newton', is assisting this train following the failure of 60023, 'Golden Eagle', which has had its connecting rods removed for the journey south. You always knew when a Gresley was on its way from the unique 'triple-beat'.

CAI166-Don1847-1936-(Class A4 No.60023) & Don1875-1938-(Class A4 No.60005) at Doncaster -03-11-61.jpg

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I and friends went  regularly on the train from Sheffield Victoria to Retford to go trainspotting in the 1950's. When it rained or snowed we played shove 'appenny  in the waiting room there. In those days there was a crossover of the main line & it was a terrific sight seeing the express trains on the down line  going from side to side as the went across it. Eventually they put the underpass in as trains had come off apparently.

I love Unitedite Returns photo of the 2 A4's double heading - must have been a very rare event !

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I seem to think the station received a bit of a makeover, probably in the 1930's. I say this because the Booking Hall  interior was architecturally quite distinct from the rest of the Victorian station .

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On ‎25‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 11:12, lysander said:

I seem to think the station received a bit of a makeover, probably in the 1930's. I say this because the Booking Hall  interior was architecturally quite distinct from the rest of the Victorian station .

Very probably I suppose, as earlier photographs depict the war memorial standing within its own colonnaded pavilion across the front of the station forecourt, and it must, at some stage, have been moved inside.

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On 25/10/2017 at 08:50, Unitedite Returns said:

For the benefit of those younger readers who don't know what a "Streak" was, here are a couple, caught heading southbound at Doncaster on 03/11/1961.

Unusual to find two of these locomotives running in tandam like this, but no.60005, 'Sir Charles Newton', is assisting this train following the failure of 60023, 'Golden Eagle', which has had its connecting rods removed for the journey south. You always knew when a Gresley was on its way from the unique 'triple-beat'.

CAI166-Don1847-1936-(Class A4 No.60023) & Don1875-1938-(Class A4 No.60005) at Doncaster -03-11-61.jpg

Thanks for that photo.  I saw a Streak (Union of S. Africa I think) heading a special train which stopped at Downham Market, near our home, about 2 years ago. As the deep whistle warned us of its approach, I said to Mrs. Athy "I've waited about 50 years to hear that sound again". I didn't quite have tears in my eyes but it was a damn' close-run thing. I'm not sure that she fully understood.

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