Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Nathan J. Staniforth

#1 Brook Lane, Hackenthorpe

Recommended Posts

It appears that my Staniforth family lived at #1 Brook Lane throughout most of the 1800s and into the very early 1900s, would anyone have a directory that would show the residential history. The road is in Hackenthorpe which obviously was part of Beighton Parish before 1900. Any help would be appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Nathan J. Staniforth said:

It appears that my Staniforth family lived at #1 Brook Lane throughout most of the 1800s and into the very early 1900s, would anyone have a directory that would show the residential history. The road is in Hackenthorpe which obviously was part of Beighton Parish before 1900. Any help would be appreciated.

Sorry nothing about your Family on Brook Hill but maybe one of their neighbours .

Sheffield Independent 15 June 1880

Sheffield Independent 15 June 1880.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wouldn't the relevant census be a good place to start?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, lysander said:

Wouldn't the relevant census be a good place to start?

On the more recent Census records where Addess info was recorded, #1 Brook Lane is the address, also on death certificates it is mentioned, the earliest being Stephen Staniforth that died 1898, he died #1 Brook Lane, so really it's any dates before 1890s that I would be looking for, I know my great great grandfather and his siblings were all born there as referenced in birth certs and these were all 1880s/1890s. Really I'm just curious to know when they actually moved into this address, when my great grandfather Charles Heaton Staniforth died in 1917, he auctioned off 6 houses all on Brook Lane, so he was the owner of at least 6 of the terraces

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Attached is the newspaper article regarding the auction in 1917, as far as we know my great great grandfather Herbert and his brother Samuel bought at least 4 of them back.

Charles Deceased.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1851 Census shows a Staniforth Family Living at 210 Brook Hill with a Son Herbert Born in 1842.

 

 

Staniforth.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely not my family, Herbert Heaton Staniforth was born to Charles Heaton Staniforth and Ann Miller. I should stress I'm not looking for family history information here, I know my tree is solid and I've had it proof checked by various people from the Archives and local family history group (Angela is a godsend over there).

This is the 1851 Census that has Charles' Parents Stephen Staniforth and Ann (born Clayton, then Heaton from first marriage)

1851 Census Stephen and Ann.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see he goes from being a "sickle tedder" to being a "sickle maker"....any idea what the former was? I also note the alternative spelling of Dronfield.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, lysander said:

I see he goes from being a "sickle tedder" to being a "sickle maker"....any idea what the former was? I also note the alternative spelling of Dronfield.

That's interesting to note, I'm not actually sure what a sickle tedder would be, we're the same Staniforths from the Staniforth Works Sickleworks that was just around the corner so all of their occupations are related to sickles up until the coal mines opening in the 1900s, I never noticed 'Tedder' before you pointed it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

58 minutes ago, lysander said:

I see he goes from being a "sickle tedder" to being a "sickle maker"....any idea what the former was? I also note the alternative spelling of Dronfield.

Sickle tedding .... https://books.google.co.uk/books

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 And me too! The process of  welding soft iron and shear steel  together  by pressure to form a material ( combined iron and steel)which was both flexible but also allowed for a hard cutting edge, was perfected in our area, . As late as the 1970s, Rotherham-Tinsley Steel were still producing by this method ...with the largest market being that for plough share blades. These were exported all over the world...until a Norwegian company, Kverneland, together with a German steel mill perfected an alternative and much cheaper material. This was the end of combined iron and steel. Sickle and scythe manufacturers had.already turned to using special rolled profiles out of carbon .43/.48% steel and heat treating the cutting edge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hackenthorpe 1871 & 1879 ( Whites Directory)

 

1871 Whites Directory.jpg

1879 Whites Directory.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×