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Here's what was there before the Hole In The Road was built


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5 hours ago, Paul Watkinson said:

I'm new on here can't find answer when was the hole-in-the -road built&why?how did it come to be in the first place ?

The Hole in The Road opened on 27 November 1967, from memory it was the time when the council had a plan for a fast moving circular traffic system and thought that pedestrians were best to cross roads underground, hence subways all over the place.

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As a student in Sheffield, I banked at the Midland Bank, High Street, which of course, as many of you will recall, had subterranean pedestrian access directly out of The Hole in the Road, like a number of other surrounding business premises. Rackham's had such similar access, I am sure, and possibly also, C. & A. Like many students at that time, much of my financial outlay was expended in beverages of an alcoholic nature, and when overdrawn, the Midland Bank used to write to me on many an occasion, asking me, not always too politely, to bring my account back into credit. I have therefore, always thought it poetic justice of the most eloquent kind, that the said Midland Bank is now an hostelry itself.

What existed before The Hole in the Road was built was in part, this. The single story flat roofed building adjoining the Walsh's - Rackham's building contained the gent's outfitters Willerbys at the end nearest to Walshs (of which it may have been a franchise) and next-door to that Marsdens, (what today might be called a 'fast food restaurant'. Both depicted by arrows. The occasion, for those that are interested, is 02/10/1960, the penultimate weekend of tram working in Sheffield, and the tram-car depicted, No.513, was one of the two Robert's tram-cars specially repainted as part of the 'last week celebrations', and it is seen here, taking part in an enthusiasts special event.

PT097-Sheffield Transport No.513-High Street, Sheffield-02-10-1960 - Web Copy.jpg

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I've been told that this photo of my dad was taken on Change Alley. Is there enough to confirm or reject that idea please. It would have been taken early 50s (before 1954)

dad.JPG

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Hi Minimo

The Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham for 1951 lists:

WESTON E, & SONS, wholesale newsagents, stationers, booksellers , bookbinders & general printers, toys and fancy goods dealers,
38 Bridge Street 3
32 Exchange Street 2

Retail Branches, 32 Change Alley 1 & 16a Tudor St 1 & printers 9 Sycamore St

As the only named premises in the picture, has only the words 'Weston & So'  visible; it is a possibility that it is could have been a building occupied by the above business at the time. If we politely ask the taxi driver to stand to one side the name E Weston & Sons might be revealed.🙂

No other business in the alphabetic listing in the 1951 directory under 'W', refers to a business with the text string Weston & So' .

Kind regards

Leipzig

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Hi again Minimo

After a bit more research I believe the photograph was taken on Tudor Street.

See the 1950s map sourced from this site and also the picture taken from the very good book - Remember Sheffield in the fifties, sixties & seventies by David Richardson. Obviously the picture quality I have uploaded is not as good as the one in the actual book itself, but should be good enough to zoom in and make an opinion.

It would seem to me that your dad was acting as a chauffeur to a taxi being used as a wedding car, the way it is dressed up with the ribbons. Don't forget that the Register Office at this time (1950s) was located on Surrey Street.

Jenkinson, Marshall & Co Ltd, the Printers and Stationers were located at 79 Surrey Street and the side of their premises extended down Tudor Street, which is what you can see in the picture. E. Weston & Sons would have occupied at the time of your photo the premises of H. Kirk shown in the 1964 picture (16a Tudor Street).

Check your photo carefully, the typeface for the words 'printers & booksellers' is the same in both pictures. Also study the column facades on the shop window divides, the drain pipe at the right of the Jenkinson & Marshall property, and also the upstairs window ledges on both pictures, and I think you will find a convincing likeness.

Hope you find this useful

Kind regards

Leipzig

TUDOR STREET MAP.png

Jenkinson and Marshall.jpg

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