Jump to content

Lost houses - Derbyshire Lane


Recommended Posts

Guest steve1963

Would love to know more about the houses which stood off Derbyshire lane (on the one-way section below the Scarsdale Road junction). On the 1897 map they are referred to as West Cliff and The Elms. Various gateposts and parts of old wall are still visible from the road. Presumably they were demolished in connection with the quarry/brickworks off Chesterfield Road (now Homebase etc).

derbys lane gateposts.jpg

derbys lane 1897.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
SteveHB

1905.
100  Lee  Arthur  John,  pattern  ma.
102  Slater  Leonard,  iron  broker.
104  Houldsworth  Charles  Edward, (The  Elms).

-------------------------------------------------------------
1911.
100  Speed  Hugh, (j) organ builder.
102  Slater  Leonard,  metal  broker.
104  Houldsworth  Charles  Edward,  housholder.

Link to post
Share on other sites
SteveHB

1925 directory.

100 Audley  William  John, manager.
102 Fox John  Thomas.
104  Gregory  Mrs. Annie  Elizabeth.
104 Gregory  Bros.,  haulage  contrs.
108  Green  Miss  Emma.
110 Auckland  Mrs.  Emily.
112 Sanderson  William  Bernard, (j)  fitter.
114 Gay George,  wharfman.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Charles Houldsworth of the Elms in 1899 was a clerk at the Sheffield and Hallamshire Bank.  The Elms had previously been occupied by William Gillatt (b 1830) who in the 1901 census claimed to be a retired commercial traveller, but in 1891 had claimed to be a retired farmer.  In 1900 Mr Gillatt became a shareholder in Thomas Lawrence and Co., a new firm set up to purchase an existing steel melting firm in Attercliffe.  Previously, Wm. Gillatt had lived at Cliffefield, Derbyshire Lane, where he had alterations made in 1885, the architect being Thomas G. Edwards.  He liked having changes made to his houses, as in 1895 he employed the architect W.H.Lancashire to plan alterations to the Elms.

The previous occupant of the Elms had been Verdon Woofindin, who died on 30th March 1888, leaving £21,975 8s 10d to his brother George (of 2 Kenwood-bank, Sharrow).  A sale of the household effects of Mr Woofindin was advertised in the Independent, and included oil paintings, ornaments and a Spanish mahogany cabinet.  Verdon Woofindin had been a die sinker, silver chaser and embosser. in 1833 based in Fitzwilliam street, and in 1847 Whites directory shows him in the same line of business at 151 Fitwilliam street.  In 1858 he had been living at Crosspool, near to Alfred, George and Vincent Woofindin.

I've not found much on West Cliff - in 1896 Major Acton had a ballroom and WC added (the architect was WH Lancashire).  Major Acton was a regular guest at the Cutlers Feasts.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest steve1963

Blimey, that was quick - many thanks both. I might have a look round on the other side of the wall some time, see if there's any evidence on the ground (what's left it) of the houses or outbuildings etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Meersbrook

Blimey, that was quick - many thanks both. I might have a look round on the other side of the wall some time, see if there's any evidence on the ground (what's left it) of the houses or outbuildings etc.

Don't think that you will find any building evidence as I think that earth etc has been placed up against the boundary wall 2/3ft deep

Link to post
Share on other sites
Heartshome

Hi all. If you are interested in a little more info on these houses, my friend has told me there is a real nice bit & photo in this last issue of ACTIVE 8. That is Sept 2020.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Organgrinder

As a teenager,I remember briefly knowing a youth called David Bunting who lived in one of these houses.

He told us that the cliff kept falling away and they were getting nearer to the edge all the time.

That would have been in the early 1950's

It stuck in my mind because I remember thinking that I would have been too scared to live there.

Strangely enough, my Mum and my aunt both worked at the brickyard down below until around 1854, I think.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...