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andy1702

Gas Lamps

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Now the dark nights are with us once again, I thought this would be a good time to start a thread about Sheffield's historic gas lamps.

There are still quite a few very old gas lamp posts around the city, most of which now have later electric lamps fastened to the top. Amey are now replacing these lights, but instead of putting the LED lamps on the old poles, they seem to be replacing the whole pole and theorefore robbing our streets of a bit more of their heritage.

On a brighter note (sorry!), most of the Webb Patent Distructor Lamps are now grade 2 listed. I say 'most' because according to some sources there are certain ones around the city that are not. I can also report that at elast three of these were still burning bright as of October 25th 2014 in the Nether Edge area, mainly thanks to the great refuirbishment work done by the Nether Edge Neighbourhood Group some years ago.

So yesterday a visit was made to two of the Webb lamps. Photos are below.

Meanwhile I'm still looking for some of the old cast iron lamp posts to restore to their proper gas-lit glory. If you know where they are disappearing to, please get in touch.

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You could ask AMEY, They must do something with them. You would think they would be selling them "as is", or for scrap, depending on which raises the most money.

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Time for an update on operaion mantle. I've now won a lamp post on e-bay. You have to be a bit careful buying lamp posts on there as there are a lot of repro ones out there, but I've managed to find a real one. It looks very similar, although not exactly the same, as those that are still in place near Heeley. I've just got the post, not the lantern, so I might end up making one of those. Has anybody got a good close up pic of a Sheffield lantern?

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Found another working Webb lamp today. This one is in Broomhill!

Does anybody know who looks after this one? It's flickering and the glass is filthy, so I'm guessing it needs a new mantle. Either we need to let it's caretaker know or I'll have to go out in the dead of night with my ladder and fit one myself. :)

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Found another working Webb lamp today. This one is in Broomhill!

attachicon.gifSheffield-20141029-00978.jpg

Does anybody know who looks after this one? It's flickering and the glass is filthy, so I'm guessing it needs a new mantle. Either we need to let it's caretaker know or I'll have to go out in the dead of night with my ladder and fit one myself. :)

This one in fact.

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Time for an update on operaion mantle. I've now won a lamp post on e-bay. You have to be a bit careful buying lamp posts on there as there are a lot of repro ones out there, but I've managed to find a real one. It looks very similar, although not exactly the same, as those that are still in place near Heeley. I've just got the post, not the lantern, so I might end up making one of those. Has anybody got a good close up pic of a Sheffield lantern?

Is it a Webb type post or a standard gas lamp type? The Webb ones are quite a bit larger in diameter than a standard one as it included the gas supply pipe and the vent from the sewer.

Not sure what you mean by a "Sheffield" lantern, when the Webb lamps were restored one lantern was so far gone it was used as a pattern and we had it handmade by a local craftsman. The nearest I've found on the websites was one by Sugg lighting, the Guildhall http://www.sugglighting.co.uk/pages/historical_lighting/guildhall.php

For the heritage areas we used Urbis Abbey gas style lanterns, http://www.urbislighting.com/gbu-en/Products/Pages/Abbey.aspx, at least these will give you an idea of the size you are looking for.

Nigel L

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Is it a Webb type post or a standard gas lamp type? The Webb ones are quite a bit larger in diameter than a standard one as it included the gas supply pipe and the vent from the sewer.

Not sure what you mean by a "Sheffield" lantern, when the Webb lamps were restored one lantern was so far gone it was used as a pattern and we had it handmade by a local craftsman. The nearest I've found on the websites was one by Sugg lighting, the Guildhall http://www.sugglighting.co.uk/pages/historical_lighting/guildhall.php

For the heritage areas we used Urbis Abbey gas style lanterns, http://www.urbislighting.com/gbu-en/Products/Pages/Abbey.aspx, at least these will give you an idea of the size you are looking for.

Nigel L

Thanks Nigel. That may be what gets put up now, but I think they're quite a bit different to the proper original gas lights that used to be around the city. There were probably a number of different types, but I'm looking for old photos so I can remanufacture a lantern as close as possible to the original type used in the city. I'm planning to re-erect the post I've got and install a genuine original type gas light on the top, complete with clockwork mechanism if possible.

The Webb lamps always look good. The post I've got is just an ordinary one (not a destructor lamp) and the casting is a slightly different pattern to the ones still supporting electric heads in Sheffield. I'm on the lookout for where the posts are going that Amey are ripping out, but I hevent's spotted any turning up in salvage yards or on e-bay yet.

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Patent GB190101096 (A) - Improvements in Lamp Heads particularly adapted for Lamps for the Extraction and Destruction of Sewer Gas.

Inventor: WEBB JOSEPH EDMUND

Street and like lamps.-A head for use on a lamp for extracting and destroying sewer gas comprises a base-plate a supported by frames b on the post b<1> and provided with grooved rods or frames c connected to a ring e, to which is hinged at i a hood g adapted to be clamped on to an asbestos packing-ring f carried on the ring e by bolts j, and formed with a flange k which engages over a flange on the ring e. The terminal h<1> of the hood is forked, so as to engage the arm b<2> of the lamp post when turned back as shown in dotted lines. The glasses d slide between the bars c, and can be readily replaced when broken. The hood is formed with an outer supplemental hood l to cover the parts j &c.

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Looks like I'm going to be building the lantern from scratch for the gas lamp. I like the Webb design, but don't fancy trying to source the curved glasses. I'm thinking I might go for something with 6 or 8 glasses, so it lind of looks round without actually being round. Watch this space...

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Calvin and I had quite a productive day today. Firstly, I have now collected a cast iron lamp post from an E-Bay seller in Sheffield. Unfortunately i don't think the post is native to the city, but it's certainly a very old one from somewhere and will form the first part of 'operation mantle', my quest to preserve whatever historic street furniture I can before Amey obliterate everything.

With the lamp post safely loaded, we drove across the city and ended up around the Myrtle Road area, just off East Bank Road. There are still a lot of old cast iron lamp posts here, which were almost certainly originally gas lamps. With very little effort I managed to find three totally different castings within the space of a few minutes.

First there was this type below. Note the design of the ladder bars with the flat ends.

Then, on one of the streets off Myrtle Road, we found this type, with acorn-shaped ends to the ladder bars.

This one also had a makers name cast into it.

Finally, we found another post with flat ended ladder bars, similar to the first photo.

But the difference was this one also had a makers name, which the first one definitely didn't.

So my next question... Who were Moorwoods Ltd?

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THE LONDON GAZETTE, AUGUST 19th 1910

The Companies (Consolidation) Act, 1908.
MOORWOOD, SONS, AND CO. Limited.

At an Extraordinary General Meeting of Moor wood,Sons, and Co. Limited, duly convened, and held at the registered office, Harleston Ironworks, Sheffield, on Thursday, the 11th day of Angust, 1910, the subjoined Extraordinary Resolution was duly passed:—
"That it has been proved to the satisfaction of this Meeting that the Company cannot, by reason of its liabilities, continue its business, and that it is advisable to wind up the same, and accordingly that the Company be wound up voluntarily."
And at such Meeting John Jones Parker, of Independent-buildings, Fargate, in the city of Sheffield, Chartered Accountant, was appointed Liquidator for the purposes of such winding up.
H. S. MOORWOOD, Chairman.

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1902

From Moorwood, Sons and Co., Limited, Sheffield (England) is a new carburettor, ----

Read more here lol

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Thanks for the info. From what I can gather it looks like Moorwood & Sons went bankrupt in 1910, but an attempt was made to sell the business as a going concern. This is interesting because the bottom half of Myrtle Road has lamp post clearly marked with the 'Moorwoods' name. However the top part of the road, where the houses date from 1935, has almost identical posts but without any makers name.

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Thanks for the info. From what I can gather it looks like Moorwood & Sons went bankrupt in 1910, but an attempt was made to sell the business as a going concern. This is interesting because the bottom half of Myrtle Road has lamp post clearly marked with the 'Moorwoods' name. However the top part of the road, where the houses date from 1935, has almost identical posts but without any makers name.

One would have thought that the road would have been built and lit all the way up, even though there were no houses on part of it at the time.

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One would have thought that the road would have been built and lit all the way up, even though there were no houses on part of it at the time.

That's certainly a possibility, although would they have bothered lighting the rural bit, especially with gas lights that someone had to physically go round and light each evening? Also there are 'lamp hole' type drain covers on top part of the street marked 'Sheffield Corporation 1935'.

The houses on the top part look to date from abot 1935 as well, but they're much older on the bottom half.

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Hi there,thought you might interested in these pictures I took of some old Sheffield made lamp posts I spotted in Beverly East Yorkshire.

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Thorncliffe Ironworks 1824! Is that from Sheffield anyone? Welcome xfireman - you'll fit right in here :)

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Calvin and I had quite a productive day today. Firstly, I have now collected a cast iron lamp post from an E-Bay seller in Sheffield. Unfortunately i don't think the post is native to the city, but it's certainly a very old one from somewhere and will form the first part of 'operation mantle', my quest to preserve whatever historic street furniture I can before Amey obliterate everything.

With the lamp post safely loaded, we drove across the city and ended up around the Myrtle Road area, just off East Bank Road. There are still a lot of old cast iron lamp posts here, which were almost certainly originally gas lamps. With very little effort I managed to find three totally different castings within the space of a few minutes.

First there was this type below. Note the design of the ladder bars with the flat ends.

attachicon.giflamp post 2.jpg

Then, on one of the streets off Myrtle Road, we found this type, with acorn-shaped ends to the ladder bars.

attachicon.giflamp post acorn bar1.jpg

This one also had a makers name cast into it.

attachicon.giflamp post acorn bar3.jpg

Finally, we found another post with flat ended ladder bars, similar to the first photo.

attachicon.giflamp post flat end bar1.jpg

But the difference was this one also had a makers name, which the first one definitely didn't.

So my next question... Who were Moorwoods Ltd?

Just off Myrtle Road, could this be 'The Band of Death'?

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Just off Myrtle Road, could this be 'The Band of Death'?

attachicon.giflamp 02.jpg

Could be. And I bet there's absolutely nothing wrong with it, it just needs straightening up. Of course if Amey rip it out they stand to make £200-£600 from that post alone. Hmmm.... I wonder where that money goes? :unsure:

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If you walk past it again, take the tape off! :)

A bit late Andy.

I spoke to one the workmen last week and asked him if they were removing the old lamp,

he said "It will be removed eventually, we are putting a new one in at the moment".

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