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RichardB

Victorian Slang Terms

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It may be a regional term of endearment, but volunteers recruited to work at the Tour de France as it passes through Yorkshire this summer have been told not to use the word "love". The so called Tour Makers have been told not to address visitors as "mate" and "darling" -- as the phrases could "offend". A spokesman for Welcome to Yorkshire said: "We don't want volunteers to use language that may cause confusion for our overseas visitors" Sunday Telegraph 20/04/14 I'm sure we in Sheffield could find a few better words than those, "in the nicest possible way of coarse" to make them feel at home. W/E.

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I don't know about slang but I think our English words are changing.

The news commentators are the worst at pronouncing our words'

Words like Drawrings [ drawings ] there's never been an R in drawings.

Skellington [ Skeleton ]

Igknowledge [ Acknowledge ] one of Jeremy Kyle's

Penjulem [Pendulum]

Immejiatly [ Immediately]

Mischevious [ Mischievous ]

Conshumer [ Consumer ] I hate that one

Cerstificate [ Certificate ]

Minu [Menu ]

Pacific [ Specific]

Secrety [ Secretary ]

Chimley [ Chimney]

And the dreaded Somethink

When I was at school we were told there were no such word as SEZ it is says but the

times the news commentators say SEZ our teacher would turn in his grave.

Also we got told off for saying Mester instead of Mister.

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I don't know about slang but I think our English words are changing.

The news commentators are the worst at pronouncing our words'

Words like Drawrings [ drawings ] there's never been an R in drawings.

Skellington [ Skeleton ]

Igknowledge [ Acknowledge ] one of Jeremy Kyle's

Penjulem [Pendulum]

Immejiatly [ Immediately]

Mischevious [ Mischievous ]

Conshumer [ Consumer ] I hate that one

Cerstificate [ Certificate ]

Minu [Menu ]

Pacific [ Specific]

Secrety [ Secretary ]

Chimley [ Chimney]

And the dreaded Somethink

When I was at school we were told there were no such word as SEZ it is says but the

times the news commentators say SEZ our teacher would turn in his grave.

Also we got told off for saying Mester instead of Mister.

Brilliant, UL:- I detest "Drorrre-ing" for "Drawing"

however,you left out "Pumpchurr" for "Puncture" and my personal bugbear, that young lady, "Laura Norder" ("Law and order") ;)

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Oh yes forgot about Laura Norder. There must be many more but the Drawrings and Conshumer are my pet hates.

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I don't know about slang but I think our English words are changing.

The news commentators are the worst at pronouncing our words'

Words like Drawrings [ drawings ] there's never been an R in drawings.

Skellington [ Skeleton ]

Igknowledge [ Acknowledge ] one of Jeremy Kyle's

Penjulem [Pendulum]

Immejiatly [ Immediately]

Mischevious [ Mischievous ]

Conshumer [ Consumer ] I hate that one

Cerstificate [ Certificate ]

Minu [Menu ]

Pacific [ Specific]

Secrety [ Secretary ]

Chimley [ Chimney]

And the dreaded Somethink

When I was at school we were told there were no such word as SEZ it is says but the

times the news commentators say SEZ our teacher would turn in his grave.

Also we got told off for saying Mester instead of Mister.

The word DRAWRING is a particular trait of people from down South, I also hate the mis-pronounced Something, now it's Sumfink.

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Thank goodness it's not only me that cringes when I hear the English language abused by commentators, politicians,

and the University educated upper classes of our society who SHOULD know better.

H.R.H. Prince Charles is also very good at putting things on the drawring board.

Sorry if I seem to have gone over the top a little but this one is certainly my pet hate.

KEN.

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I can forgive mostl errors when made by "ordinary people". I'm far from perfect myself of course, but when it is someone who is paid to communicate, then there is no excuse.

One annoying one is the much debated "hard vs. difficult". Although the OED lists the two as synonymous, they can only be so in certain contexts.

Generally speaking, hard implies physical effort, and difficult implies complexity.

It is hard work to dig a hole, but not necessarily difficult. It could become difficult if certain complex circumstances were involved.

It is a difficult job to assemble a clockwork mechanism, but not hard, as it takes very little physical effort. It would, however, perhaps be hard work if the mechanism was a massive clock in a tall tower.

Most of us will use hard when we mean difficult, from time to time, but I don't accept it from the likes of journalists and politicians.

That said, the trouble with being a bit pedantic is that there is always someone who is more pedantic than you are. :)

==================

What's it all coming to !

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I've a number of such bugbears (it's an age thing). One is the use of 'underestimate' when they mean 'overestimate' and vice versa. A recent one is 'going forward', much beloved by politicians, local and national. And after every tragedy, 'lessons will be/have been learned', and lo and behold, sooner or later, the same thing happens again. And after any event, no matter how minor, 'local people have been devastated' by whatever it is, or are 'coming to terms with it'. (A classic example was some years ago when an RAF trainer crashed in a field a couple of miles from a village in North Yorkshire. No-one was hurt, no damage was done, but locals were said on Look Leeds to 'be coming to terms with what has happened'.

I shall now go and lie down in a darkened room with a damp towel on my head. I may be gone for some time.

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Reporters - aaargh !

When some poor soul has just suffered some tragic loss, the reporter shoves the mic in their face and asks "How did you feel when you heard the news?"

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I was watching tv channel Yesterday the other day, it was about the second world war and

the number of times the narrator said Shtalin instead of Stalin.

It must be their gleaming white nashers that get in the way.

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Regarding Victorian terms, my Father & Mother never said twenty five past or twenty five to, they always put the five first "five and twenty" past or to, they did this right up to the day they died. My Father also taught me to say Scoile for school, I thought it was just Sheffield slang but his parents were Irish and Scoile is Irish for School also he used to ask me if I wanted to have a "Caca" (go to the toilet) this was again Irish for S--T.

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My parents said the same with the five first , five and twenty passed, not so sure about the caca lol

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My Mother also used the word "Skerrick" which means a very small item or piece, she used to say "I haven't a Skerrick in for tea" The word was once used on CALL MY BLUFF and the explanation was as I've stated BUT they said it was an Australian word which I doubt very much, I cant see the English settlers making up a word then it being brought back here, its more like it was taken out there by the settlers, English or Irish and was eventually absorbed into the Australian language.

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I've not heard of sherrick but one my husband is always saying is " Skew Wiff "

I'd never heard of that either but having explained the meaning I now understand

[ I think ] :blink:

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Skewiff means not set square or off at an angle. The word was SKERRICK not SHERRICK.Is it a Typo?

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I thought it was skerrit, but however it may be spelled or indeed it's exact pronunciation, I agree with the usage as being "to not have anything".

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I remember at least one of my teachers, either at Gleadless County or King Ted's, using the form "Five and twenty to" when referring to the time. I don't know if he was a native Sheffielder or not.

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Again, not slang and probably nothing to do with Victorians but "of a" in place of "on" when talking about days or occasions.

eg. He always went to the pub "of a" Friday night.

or. We usually go out walking "of a" weekend

I don't know if this is/was peculiar to Sheffield, The North, or if it was just general.

Don't seem to hear it said nowadays though.

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Again, not slang and probably nothing to do with Victorians but "of a" in place of "on" when talking about days or occasions.

eg. He always went to the pub "of a" Friday night.

or. We usually go out walking "of a" weekend

I don't know if this is/was peculiar to Sheffield, The North, or if it was just general.

Don't seem to hear it said nowadays though.

I think all this fantastic " English " has come down through the ages, it's not a Victorian quirke, if you read the wonderful use of words that the Tudors used, read any letter written by Elizabeth I the use of words is brilliant, Shakespeare was a wonderful wordsmith using descriptive phrases we don't hear today, " know worra mean, right"!!

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