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Sheffield History

The Wedding Cake Registry Office In Sheffield

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Looking for as much information as possible on the Wedding Cake Registry Office that used to be in Sheffield.

For example when it was built, when it was knocked down, and a few stories such as famous people that might have been there, got married there etc, plus a few stories from those who did get married there.

Always seemed a bit soulless to me, like a crematorium. Same kind of feel really, in one door, out the next as quickly as possible without it feeling obvious that you were on a conveyor belt system

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Star piece about said Wedding Cake.

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Built 1973 ...

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Previous blatherings ...

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Something I do recall was some poor workman who was carrying out repairs to the curved paving just outside the entrance doors, who almost disappeared down a extremely deep hole that appeared in front of his feet. This was some years before it's final closure.

It turned out it was the well for the old Eyre Street Brewery that used to stand on the site.

Brewery wells were hundreds of feet deep in order to obtain the pure water necessary for the beer.

At the time I worked just over the way and went for a look but they were keeping people well clear because they weren't sure what it was. They capped it and put a brass plaque on top.

Around the same time they were digging the foundations for the SHU footbridge over Pond Street.

They found a large iron plate just where one of the bridge piers was to go. When they removed it another shaft was revealed. This one wasn't too deep and had a horizontal heading so far down it running under Pond Street. Strangely enough the workmen reported fresh air coming up the shaft. Although it too was the site of an old brewery, ( Rawson's ), it wasn't thought to be a well, but rather a very old mine working. Anyway it was filled with concrete before anybody could blink.

When the new Harmer Building extension to the University was built circa 1990, the one in front of the Owen Building, they had to spend months injecting cement slurry under great pressure, into the ground to stabilise it. Apparently it was full of old mineworkings and described as "like a swiss cheese".

HD

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I had mentioned some kind of "dirty great 'ole" in previous blatherings.

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Something I do recall was some poor workman who was carrying out repairs to the curved paving just outside the entrance doors, who almost disappeared down a extremely deep hole that appeared in front of his feet. This was some years before it's final closure.

It turned out it was the well for the old Eyre Street Brewery that used to stand on the site.

Brewery wells were hundreds of feet deep in order to obtain the pure water necessary for the beer.

At the time I worked just over the way and went for a look but they were keeping people well clear because they weren't sure what it was. They capped it and put a brass plaque on top.

Around the same time they were digging the foundations for the SHU footbridge over Pond Street.

They found a large iron plate just where one of the bridge piers was to go. When they removed it another shaft was revealed. This one wasn't too deep and had a horizontal heading so far down it running under Pond Street. Strangely enough the workmen reported fresh air coming up the shaft. Although it too was the site of an old brewery, ( Rawson's ), it wasn't thought to be a well, but rather a very old mine working. Anyway it was filled with concrete before anybody could blink.

When the new Harmer Building extension to the University was built circa 1990, the one in front of the Owen Building, they had to spend months injecting cement slurry under great pressure, into the ground to stabilise it. Apparently it was full of old mineworkings and described as "like a swiss cheese".

HD

Crikey !!

Awesome stuff thank you for posting that !!

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When Arundel Gate from Castle Square to Furnival gate was being built, there was a delay because they uncovered a seam of coal, and the then Coal Board exercised their legal option of extracting the coal before work on the road could proceed. More recently, digging the foundations for one of the new buildings just off the roundabout at Furnival Gate they hit the coal again. And some distance away, it was reported in the Telegraph that the work on the extension for the Childrens Hospital (or was it the new Physics block at the Uni?) involved extracting a number of lorryloads of coal. Sheffield seems to be built on coal. Remind me, where do we get our coal? USA? Colombia? Russia?

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I got married in the wedding cake building.

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Something I do recall was some poor workman who was carrying out repairs to the curved paving just outside the entrance doors, who almost disappeared down a extremely deep hole that appeared in front of his feet. This was some years before it's final closure.

It turned out it was the well for the old Eyre Street Brewery that used to stand on the site.

Brewery wells were hundreds of feet deep in order to obtain the pure water necessary for the beer.

At the time I worked just over the way and went for a look but they were keeping people well clear because they weren't sure what it was. They capped it and put a brass plaque on top.

HD

Does the brass plaque still exist or even the site of the brewery? I can't really picture the various changes in the immediate area and how they might have affected any remains. Mind you last time something you wrote intrigued me i went searching for small Blitz remains so i might just go and get a spade now!

Interesting stuff as ever!

Edited by vox
Reply moved out of quote box

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Does the brass plaque still exist or even the site of the brewery? I can't really picture the various changes in the immediate area and how they might have affected any remains. Mind you last time something you wrote intrigued me i went searching for small Blitz remains so i might just go and get a spade now!

Interesting stuff as ever!

Good Luck with that quest Calvin72.

The last time I looked someone had placed a rather tall building on the site :(

HD

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Yes, a VERY tall building HD

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Yes, a VERY tall building HD

I was struck by the irony that Sheffield's tallest building might possibly be built over Sheffield's deepest hole, always assuming that it had been capped and not filled in.

However looking on a sub-site of The British Geological Survey that shows the depth of boreholes all over Sheffield (and England) I see that there are various contenders for the longest drop towards the antipodes.

The bore-hole where the Register Office is located is classified, but the Exchange Brewery had a couple of wells 512 feet deep and the Sheaf Brewery had some at 440 feet deep.

The George Bassett factory has a couple at 804 feet deep.

WELL WELL fancy that.

HD

If anyone else is interested in what's beneath our feet you can find the website at http://www.bgs.ac.uk/data/boreholescans/home.html

Edit 2

Further to the above I've just found another reference to a well at Exchange Brewery at 920 feet deep.

Edited by hilldweller

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I'm beginning to wish that I hadn't found that borehole website. :wacko:

I've just found a reference to a 50 foot deep well that was sunk in August 1939 in the grounds of the old Royal Infirmary.

It's purpose was for the storage of Radium isotopes for the Sheffield Radium Centre which was located on that site.

It appears the water level was 12 feet down.

I can appreciate that the Radium had to be safe from enemy action but sticking it in the local water table sounds a bit rash to say the least.

Apparently the isotopes were transferred to Tree Root Walk at the end of the war and the well was abandoned.

And to think people are getting worried about water supplies being contaminated by fracking operations. :o

HD

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Image taken by me in November 1976, so the "Wedding Cake" would have been only three years' old at the time.

I never imagined, back then, when I took this particular photograph, that the subject in question would only have so short a lifespan.

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I got married and registered my children births in the wedding cake

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I registered my daughter's birth there. The registrar asked when she was born, I said the 1st of January. What time? 9a.m. Brilliant, I win the sweepstake!

Apparently the registrars had an annual sweepstake for who would register the first birth of the year!

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I only visited the building once, went to collect a copy of my dads death certificate.

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I too was married there in October 1974. When it came to exchanging vows I couldn't spronounce solemnly which raised a few sniggers.

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