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Calvin72

Window Tax 1696-1851

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From Wikipedia;

The window tax was a property tax based on the number of windows in a house. It was a significant social, cultural, and architectural force in England, France and Scotland during the 18th and 19th centuries. To avoid the tax some houses from the period can be seen to have bricked-up window-spaces (ready to be glazed or reglazed at a later date), as a result of the tax. It was introduced in 1696 and was repealed in 1851, 156 years after first being introduced. Spain and France both had window taxes as well for similar reasons.

Arundel Lane, City Centre

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I was only thinking about the window tax the other day!

Thats why i love this forum/site!

Thanks for the info Calvin!! :)

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From Wikipedia;

The window tax was a property tax based on the number of windows in a house. It was a significant social, cultural, and architectural force in England, France and Scotland during the 18th and 19th centuries. To avoid the tax some houses from the period can be seen to have bricked-up window-spaces (ready to be glazed or reglazed at a later date), as a result of the tax. It was introduced in 1696 and was repealed in 1851, 156 years after first being introduced. Spain and France both had window taxes as well for similar reasons.

Arundel Lane, City Centre

Try ..... Arundel Street, corner of Charles Street ;-)

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Two for the price of one on Bank Street.

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Two for the price of one on Bank Street.

Do we know when the above properties were built. They must have been before 1851 as after this date the windows could have been built in and no tax paid.

I also wonder why they were never installed once the tax was removed. For that matter why was the wall not just built flat why simulate a window.

jiginc

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Do we know when the above properties were built. They must have been before 1851 as after this date the windows could have been built in and no tax paid.

I also wonder why they were never installed once the tax was removed. For that matter why was the wall not just built flat why simulate a window.

jiginc

It seems that the only reason for bricking up a window, rather than getting rid of all trace of it, was to allow the space to return to being a window later. Mind you the tax lasted a long time to plan ahead! As to why they never returned to a window after 1851 ... who knows? :)

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It seems that the only reason for bricking up a window, rather than getting rid of all trace of it, was to allow the space to return to being a window later. Mind you the tax lasted a long time to plan ahead! As to why they never returned to a window after 1851 ... who knows? :)

To take another example, Hillsborough hall, which was built in 1779. There are a few closed up windows on the building, which are filled with the same ashlar stone blocks that the rest of the building is made from. Inside there is no trace of these windows, and I've seen it suggested that in fact such windows were never intended as such, but are simply to give symmetry to the appearance of the building.

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Remember that some of these buildings had blank windows built in for architectural and aesthetic reasons. I would suggest that Calvin's house on Bank Street is one of those houses.

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"A tax on health and a tax on light and air" was the campaign for its abolishment's cry. The tax mainly affected the middle and lower classes...the rich could afford this tax which had been introduced as a means to recoup losses to the coinage by clipping. One side affect was on glass manufacturers who, despite the boom in house building, saw no increase in demand.

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I think a lot of windows were bricked up to make more wall space inside the rooms. (as in the example on Charles Street)

Having a window on both exterior walls, a doorway on one of the interiors and a fireplace on the other one, leaves no space for a bed and a wardrobe. I know from experience. :(

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From Wikipedia;

The window tax was a property tax based on the number of windows in a house. It was a significant social, cultural, and architectural force in England, France and Scotland during the 18th and 19th centuries. To avoid the tax some houses from the period can be seen to have bricked-up window-spaces (ready to be glazed or reglazed at a later date), as a result of the tax. It was introduced in 1696 and was repealed in 1851, 156 years after first being introduced. Spain and France both had window taxes as well for similar reasons.

Arundel Lane, City Centre

Is this where we get the saying "daylight robbery" from?

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