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Am I A Sheffielder?


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Hi Sheffmark, having re-read all the posts carefully I don't believe there is a 'general consensus'. Dave, Barbara and yourself are of one opinion, whereas Saw119, Vox and Thylacine express another. I'm not sure if Calvin, who posed the original question, has found his answer and Athy is sitting on the fence.

Richard who was born in Sheffield, adds another dimension by asking "Am I still a Sheffielder?"

The question I think, is still open to debate. So my final words are:-

In't Wicker whear t'watter runs o'er t'weir

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Damned uncomfortable, this fence-sitting, too. I would perhaps be justified in calling myself a Sheffielder by upbringing.

Calvin, no cup tie against Albion I'm afraid, though they did try hard against Hull City.

Sheffmark, from what I remember of it, your description of Attercliffe as an outpost is spot on. It may have changed since, of course!

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"In't Wicker whear t'watter runs o'er t'weir" sounds more like a Barnsley (or sterotypical yorkshire) accent to me.

Manchester shortened the word "the" to "th" as witnessed on Coronation Street "Rita's just gone to th' warehouse"

Barnsley shortened the word "the" to "t" as in "It bit daarn t'pit"

Sheffielders removed the the word "The" completely and replaced it with a glottal stop, so I would expect a Sheffielder to say "In ^ Wicker whear ^ watter runs ovver ^ weir (^ = glottal stop)

There you go, that's put ^ cat firmly among ^ pidgeons lol

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Not at all, you're quite right. I used the 't' as that's the most common way it's been represented in print. However, a true Sheffielder would know what it means and that it isn't pronounced. Whatever you may think of him, the 'celebrity' who gave the most lucid explanation of this, with correct pronunciation, is Jeremy Clarkson, in an interview on the box a little while ago.

(I do disagree with 'ovver' rather than 'o'er' though. But I've gin o'er arguin' sithee.) ;-)

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"In't Wicker whear t'watter runs o'er t'weir" sounds more like a Barnsley (or sterotypical yorkshire) accent to me.

Manchester shortened the word "the" to "th" as witnessed on Coronation Street "Rita's just gone to th' warehouse"

Barnsley shortened the word "the" to "t" as in "It bit daarn t'pit"

Sheffielders removed the the word "The" completely and replaced it with a glottal stop, so I would expect a Sheffielder to say "In ^ Wicker whear ^ watter runs ovver ^ weir (^ = glottal stop)

There you go, that's put ^ cat firmly among ^ pidgeons lol

You mean" pu^ ca^" lol

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Just discovered that ʔ (like a question mark but without the dot at the bottom) is the symbol for a glottal stop

"Inʔ Wicker whearʔ watter runs o'erʔ weir" he he

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Not at all, you're quite right. I used the 't' as that's the most common way it's been represented in print. However, a true Sheffielder would know what it means and that it isn't pronounced. Whatever you may think of him, the 'celebrity' who gave the most lucid explanation of this, with correct pronunciation, is Jeremy Clarkson, in an interview on the box a little while ago.

(I do disagree with 'ovver' rather than 'o'er' though. But I've gin o'er arguin' sithee.) ;-)

Well, as I think he is an arrogant, conceited, self-centred, self-opinionated big head then he is bound to be right isn't he?

Anyway, he doesn't talk like us and he certainly isn't a Sheffielder, - he comes from Doncaster.

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Well, as I think he is an arrogant, conceited, self-centred, self-opinionated big head then he is bound to be right isn't he?

Anyway, he doesn't talk like us and he certainly isn't a Sheffielder, - he comes from Doncaster.

................. he he )))

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Hi Sheffmark, having re-read all the posts carefully I don't believe there is a 'general consensus'. Dave, Barbara and yourself are of one opinion, whereas Saw119, Vox and Thylacine express another. I'm not sure if Calvin, who posed the original question, has found his answer and Athy is sitting on the fence.

Richard who was born in Sheffield, adds another dimension by asking "Am I still a Sheffielder?"

The question I think, is still open to debate. So my final words are:-

In't Wicker whear t'watter runs o'er t'weir

Hi mate!

Different peoples interpretations and changing boundries over the years has certainly not made this issue cut and dried!!

I'd love Jeremy Clarkson to say "In't Wicker whear t'watter runs o'er t'weir"!! he he

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Maybe a 'true' Sheffielder can answer this one.

Did t'watter ever run o'er t'weir in t'Wicker?

One at Lady's Bridge, the next weir down was Walk Mill at Saville Street, wasn't it?

Neither are on't Wicker

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  • 1 month later...

A true Sheffielder is born and raised in Sheffield. Immigrants from other parts of the country can be honorary Sheffielders though. :-)

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  • 1 month later...

There are two types of people, Sheffielders, and them's that wants to be.

My son in law elect was told he could become an honorary Sheffielder by passing a few basic checks.

What is Hendos, where would you find Stones, what is weshy and deedah, and what is a sneck lifter.

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