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THE CLASSIC CINEMA, Fitzalan Square Sheffield

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A somewhat uncongested Fitzalan Square and the Classic Cinema, not like today.

(Approximately 1961)

Now thats how I remember Fitzalan Square.

I do remember that the Classic has a manageress from about late 1969. She was called Pamela and had previously been cashier at Studio 7 in the Wicker.

But we lost contact after 1971 so I dont know how long she remained there.

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A somewhat uncongested Fitzalan Square and the Classic Cinema, not like today.

(Approximately 1961)

Just for the record, the Classic showed "Roman Holiday" and "Petticoat Pirates" - w/c 5th April, 1964.

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THE CLASSIC CINEMA

[Link to picture:

http://www.picturesheffield.com/cgi-bin/pi...ff.refno=s00014

Opened in February 1911 as the Electra Palace, had it's first sound movie in 1930 then it became the news theatre in September 1945, when it showed end to end newsreels of the progress of the second world war, as these were the days before television, and only recently in the televised gulf wars can younger people understand why people would have been keen to experience a theatre like this.

In 1962 the fa�ade of the theatre was altered into a more modern appearence, by cutting off the high tower and cladding the frontage in a metal rail system which allowed the hanging of letters to advertise the forthcoming attractions, and current movies. It shut it's doors as a cinema in 1982, and reverted to use as a sale room until it burned down in 1984.

TIMELINE - Classic Cinema ( Electra Palace)

Built & Open - 1911

Talkies Introduced - 1930

Changed To News Theatre - Sept 1945

Changed to Cartoon Cinema -1959

Changed to Classic & Frontage modernised - January 1962

Closed As Cinema - 24th November 1982

Desroyed in fire & Demolished -1984

Seats Appx. 670 Later reduced to 484

LOCATION

Fitzalan Square - Sheffield

Link to pictire:

http://www.picturesheffield.com/cgi-bin/pi...ff.refno=s21316

Information sourced from - http://www.rocknroll...emas/gone1.html

Some of the pictures sourced from - http://www.picturesheffield.com

I worked at the Classic Cinema in the 70s an usherette , among other places like Baileys, Club Fiesta,

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I remember as a child, having to go to Western bank childrens hospital, once a month. Not only a day off school but, as a treat, me mum used to take me afterwards to see a film at the classic. ie, Chitty chitty bang bang, Lady and the tramp ect. I remember The national anthem being played, and everyone would stand up, except me mam.

I also remember The all night kung fu films much later. a dreem come true for Kung fu fans, and caughting couples I bet. really sad when it shut.

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Great pictures, cheers.

When I was a kid I had to go to the Childrens hospital for a check up on my hips every 6 months and my Nan would first take me into either the Gambit or Davies Clock restaurant, then we'd watch a film after we'd visited the hospital. I remember seeing Oh Mr Porter, The Absent Minded Professor, Swiss Family Robinson and Song of the South in which the tar baby scared me witless.....

The "Song of the South", - now there's a rare classic Disney film.

Currently the film is almost unavailable and is never likely to be shown on TV due to its "political incorrectness" on race. It's a childrens film (Brere fox and Brere rabbit, Uncle Reamus...) but has been branded for broadcast and showing in the same category as "The Black and White Minstrel Show"

What is particularly interesting about this film, made in 1958 (I think) is the scene in which Uncle Reamus sings the song "Zip a dee doo dah". At one time it was always being shown. Interesting because it combines live action (Uncle Reamus) with cartoon animation (birds and insects) and, in true Disney cartoon quality, the two interact almost magically as though they were one, as the birds and insects fly around Uncle Reamus's head, land on his hat, even on his finger. Sheer brilliance!!! Who did they manage to do that???

A recent TV documentary would have you believe that the first use of live action interacting with animated cartoon characters was in "Mary Poppins", and cites the scene in which Dick Van Dyke dances with a load of cartoon penguins. This was made 6 years after Song of the South and it's effect could easily have been achieved by rear projection or bluescreening as although Dick van Dyke dances in time with the penguins the 2 never make contact with each other and appear independent of each other.

It is not even in the same leage of quality as Song of the South.

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The "Song of the South", - now there's a rare classic Disney film.

What is particularly interesting about this film, made in 1958 (I think) is the scene in which Uncle Reamus sings the song "Zip a dee doo dah". At one time it was always being shown. Interesting because it combines live action (Uncle Reamus) with cartoon animation (birds and insects) and, in true Disney cartoon quality, the two interact almost magically as though they were one, as the birds and insects fly around Uncle Reamus's head, land on his hat, even on his finger. Sheer brilliance!!! Who did they manage to do that???

..and here is the very scene, still available on YouTube as this particular scene is inoffensive and contains a typical Disney childrens song and that absolutely brilliant live / cartoon / interactive animation.

<iframe width="425" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LcxYwwIL5zQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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The "Song of the South", - now there's a rare classic Disney film.

Currently the film is almost unavailable and is never likely to be shown on TV due to its "political incorrectness" on race. It's a childrens film (Brere fox and Brere rabbit, Uncle Reamus...) but has been branded for broadcast and showing in the same category as "The Black and White Minstrel Show"

What is particularly interesting about this film, made in 1958 (I think) is the scene in which Uncle Reamus sings the song "Zip a dee doo dah". At one time it was always being shown. Interesting because it combines live action (Uncle Reamus) with cartoon animation (birds and insects) and, in true Disney cartoon quality, the two interact almost magically as though they were one, as the birds and insects fly around Uncle Reamus's head, land on his hat, even on his finger. Sheer brilliance!!! Who did they manage to do that???

A recent TV documentary would have you believe that the first use of live action interacting with animated cartoon characters was in "Mary Poppins", and cites the scene in which wee pipe Van Dyke dances with a load of cartoon penguins. This was made 6 years after Song of the South and it's effect could easily have been achieved by rear projection or bluescreening as although wee pipe van Dyke dances in time with the penguins the 2 never make contact with each other and appear independent of each other.

It is not even in the same leage of quality as Song of the South.

Well, Dave! "Song of the South" is even older than you think. It was first released in 1947, and the song "Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah" actually won the Best Song Oscar for that year.

The animation is wonderful, and very clever....as is wee pipe Van Dyke's dance with the penguins, 17 years later.

However, this was far from Uncle Walt's first venture into mixing live action with animation. Way back in 1923, Disney made a short film called "Alice's Wonderland" ( in black & white, of course! ), which featured a live Alice in an animated Wonderland.

Primitive by his later standards maybe, but successful enough to spawn a series of over 50 further Alice shorts, even before Mickey Mouse came along !

Some of these have been issued on DVD in the States.

There seems to be a growing clamour for the studio to issue this lovely, and totally inoffensive film on DVD. Let's hope it happens!

As for the PC Brigade ?............Well, I would gladly throw the whole lot of them into the briar patch !!!

This artwork was used for the 1980 re-issue of the film :

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Well, Dave! "Song of the South" is even older than you think. It was first released in 1947, and the song "Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah" actually won the Best Song Oscar for that year.

The animation is wonderful, and very clever....as is Dick Van Dyke's dance with the penguins, 17 years later.

However, this was far from Uncle Walt's first venture into mixing live action with animation. Way back in 1923, Disney made a short film called "Alice's Wonderland" ( in black & white, of course! ), which featured a live Alice in an animated Wonderland.

Primitive by his later standards maybe, but successful enough to spawn a series of over 50 further Alice shorts, even before Mickey Mouse came along !

Some of these have been issued on DVD in the States.

There seems to be a growing clamour for the studio to issue this lovely, and totally inoffensive film on DVD. Let's hope it happens!

As for the PC Brigade ?............Well, I would gladly through the whole lot of them into the briar patch !!!

This artwork was used for the 1980 re-issue of the film :

Sorry S24, I do sometimes get dates of particular things wrong, - but I did prempt this by saying "I think".

It is a brilliant childrens film and the PC brigade are trying to rewrite history. The film is set in the deep south of America in the second half of the 19th century. Black people had been enslaved and abused for over a century by then, they had just come out of a Civil War and the black people had won their freedom, much to the resentment of the highly racist elements in that area. That's what happened, it's history, you can't alter that. However, it is also stupid to try and "sweep it under the carpet and forget it ever happened" just because it was an unpleasant and shameful piece of our past. As several Jewish hollocaust survivors have stated when asked "why do you keep bringinging this painful issue up and reminding people about it?" the wise reply they gave was "When people forget that this ever happened, the horror and inhumanity of it, then there is danger that it will happen again" It's the same with racism.

As for the film, it needs to be seen in context, at which point it is clearly not intended to be offensive. I don't think Disney films were ever offensive, it's simply not their style.

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Just finished framing up a set of art nouveau tiles I rescued from the foyer after the fire - the soaking the building got had loosened them all! Can't believe they've been in the garage for nearly 30 years. There was an attempt to get the facade listed after the fire as this was Sheffield's only building in this style, but needless to say it was not successful. We were also told the Egyptian head on the front would be saved for Sheffield. It was removed but has never resurfaced...

My mother took me here to see the French film The Red Balloon, my first ever trip to a cinema. I seem to remember them doing late evening showings of rock films in the 70s too, Zeppelin, ELP, Floyd at Pompeii and the like.

And if you're into old cinemas, the Abbeydale is currently up for sale - yours for £150K.

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I recall very well as a little one, Mum and I going to see the Cartoons here on a Saturday. TWEETY PIE and SYLVESTER is the main one I remember, though I guess there would have been MICKEY, DONALD, POPYE and the other classics. 

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