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Calvin72

Drainspotting!

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I started out by trying to prevent their 'disappearance' to be honest vox - not sure what to think now - if people are interested i will identify locations.

My opinion is:

Eventually most of these seemingly insignificant things like street furniture, cobbles, bits of stone wall, you name it, will disappear without trace, It would be a shame to let them go without even recording their existence.

I think that any information on the history of anything in our city may just be of interest to someone in the future, even if it doesn't seem particularly earth shattering at the moment.

As you said, you started out with a particular intent, but that has lead others to delve a little deeper into other questions which have arisen, like manufacturers for instance.

Hopefully everything on this site will be around for posterity.

If you have the time and the inclination, stick it on here. Doesn't cost anything does it ?

Keep up the good work, I don't think anyone on here will criticise you for your efforts.

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Where and what is that?

Vertical slats rather than horizontal as in the photo. Looks like 1890 something dated at the bottom.

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Out and about in Crookes again today and found two completely new designs!

Sheffield Highways - c.1830-1850 (based on other designs). Located on Spring Hill, Crookesmoor.

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And Sheffield D of N (?) 1902 - any ideas about what this could be? Dept of ...?

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Duke of Norfolk?

Good call !

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Came across this Sheffield Local Board drain cover at the junction of Pomona street and Pear street this morning.

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Just to add a little bit of context for the Local Board cover it is situated next to the Bow Works which I believe date from the mid 1860's. In my opinion I don't think the drain cover could date from before that due to the fact that that area is about the extent of the town as was by about 1870.

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A bit of background on the Porter, from Hunters Bar to Pomona/Pear streets from 1876 is below. I lived in Neill Road Hunters Bar for 7 years and the cellar use to flood regularly during storms - water came in not only down the coal 'ole but poured in through the rough stonework of the cellar walls.

Extract from Dr.Griffiths report of 1876

The report prepared by Dr. Griffiths, medical officer of health, on the condition of the Porter brook sets forth a serious state of things. He has dealt with that portion of its course from Hunter’s Bar to its junction with the Sheaf. At Hunter’s Bar, the river is diverted by weirs to supply dams along Sharrow vale, and this is done so effectually, that the bed of the Porter is frequently and mostly dry ground to where the houses, called Brook side, on the north side of Ecclesall road, have been recently built. These houses overhang the brook, and until quite recently the sewage from Endcliffe and Brocco bank coursed along, passed under the bridge, and along the Porter.

Leaving the road, it passes through fields: in a devious course, north of Westbrook, to the lodge of the General Cemetery. From Hunter‘s Bar to Brook side the distance is about 300 yards, and thence to the Cemetery lodge about 1133 yards. Throughout the latter length there is little water, and that, as well as the mud and filth therein, is sewage matter, not undisturbed for lack of water since the source is cut off at Hunter's Bar, and no fresh sewage reaches it, because the new sewer from Brocco bank now receives the sewage. The Porter here, on the north side or Sharrow vale, is practically a repulsive and stagnant sewer.

Passing towards the Snuff Mill, the deposits along the sides are offensive, the banks are crumbling and falling into the bed, which is almost dry. Domestic refuse, waste vegetable, and other garden stuff, repose in the almost isolated pools of stagnant water. Leaving the Sharrow Mill Bridge, crossing to the south side of the river, north of Westbrook, drains enter the Porter under the footpath. At the end of Frog walk, crossing the wooden foot-bridge.,there is a goit with weir and by-wash. Into this weir an open course or drain conveys sewage from Broomgrove. It Is filthy and extremely offensive, and more especially so in warm and dry weather.

The brook passes under the bridge at the Cemetery gate into a dam, extending to Hardy's pick works, and what should here also be a stream is almost entirely dried up. The existence of this dam in dry weather can be detected by the stench it originates. It is disgusting night and day, nearly all the year round. It is still the receptacle for all the sewage which it can contain and obtain from Sharrow Head and Broomgrove. Nearing Sheffield, by crossing the footbridge to the path on the south side of the Porter, and running between it and the boundary of the General Cemetery to Pear street West, the stream is shallow, having an average depth of about four (4) inches, and is practically a stagnant dyke. It ls very much obstructed by quantities of silt, stones, boulders. and broken house refuse. Its northern bank is here and there much undermined by the action of floods, and the rotten character of the soil causes frequent land-slips along the side.

There appears to be stone enough in the bed of the stream to rebuild the wall. The wall on the south side requires attention; within a few feet of its present end, west of Pear street bridge, is a sewer, broken at its mouth. The wall is gradually falling down into the Porter. It should be continued alongside the footpath to the bridge. At present the footpath leads to the brink of the stream, and as it is about 20 feet deep from the path to the bed it is extremely dangerous to passengers.

The western side of the Pear street bridge, as also its eastern side, is encumbered by refuse – builder’s materials, the heaps of which form islands in the stream. From this point to Dale street bridge, or Summerfield street, the course is tortuous, and there are two sharp curves. Old mattresses and varied garbage were lodged upon the mud. The people in Pomona street complain of the stench and of the water flooding their cellars at different times. It is most probable that the absence of sewers and side-drains in Pomona street caused the cellars to become filled in flood time.

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Just to add a little bit of context for the Local Board cover it is situated next to the Bow Works which I believe date from the mid 1860's. In my opinion I don't think the drain cover could date from before that due to the fact that that area is about the extent of the town as was by about 1870.

Thanks a lot saw! Always good to find something that adds to the research and that is only the 6th definite Local Board cover found in Sheffield, and the first in that design as andy1702 says. It is interesting how many unique designs and wording examples that we have found recently. Difficult to tell if they are rare survivors or were unusual at the time of installation. I was walking in the General cemetery with a friend just a few days ago and did look around the adjacent streets, but not where you have found the drain! There are a few 1890s designs in the area, which are not uncommon but i will go back and have another poke around the area now.

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I saw these two covers today on Headford St, one looks like 1895 and tother 1897.

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Just to add a little bit of context for the Local Board cover it is situated next to the Bow Works which I believe date from the mid 1860's. In my opinion I don't think the drain cover could date from before that due to the fact that that area is about the extent of the town as was by about 1870.

Hello saw119 - I have visited the cover you found and it is a real survivor, being surrounded by modernity on all sides. I would have taken a glance up the street and moved on so it is a great find! It is on the curve of the turning which is unusual, probably a realignment of the street layout at some point.

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This ones in Paradise St, dated 1894.

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This ones in Paradise St, dated 1894.

Already mentioned earlier on the thread as it is the ONLY 1894 date yet discovered! Not that i want to put anyone off taking pics :)

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I'm after an oppinion from everyone... Would it be a good idea to map all these findings somehow? I'm wondering if a map might reveal some kind of pattern and also show how the city developed?

A very good idea andy, if not everybody, I'm sure someone will find it interesting and/or useful at some point.

There are enough posts on here to show that it is of interest.

A Google interactive map would do the job.

Anyway, everything is better recorded than not, I think.

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Couldn't agree more. We are in desperate need of a gazeteer now.

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Some maker's names for more informed people than me to tell us all about ... :)

As I posted much earlier in this thread, it seemed to be common practice for small builders to have inspection chamber covers produced with the name of the house builder cast into the lid.

I think these names would be those of the builders rather than the foundry who produced them.

We have owned three houses, built in 1939, 1957 and 1961, and they all carried the names of local bulders.

HD

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The Beeley Foundry:

In 1892 Charles Ross advertised in the Lost and Found column in the Independent: FOUND A stock of short lengths of GIRDERS for passages. Beeley Bridge Foundry

Wound up 16th April 1949

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The Beeley Foundry:

In 1892 Charles Ross advertised in the Lost and Found column in the Independent: FOUND A stock of short lengths of GIRDERS for passages. Beeley Bridge Foundry

Wound up 16th April 1949

I think you will find it was intended to have read Heeley Bridge Foundry.

Charles Ross

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I think you will find it was intended to have read Heeley Bridge Foundry.

Agreed! Well spotted Steve, full marks for quality control. I couldn't find much about them. But I wonder if Beeley Foundry Light Castings Ltd were related - a "zoom" below from a Picture Sheffield photo - Light Castings were in Warren Street, next to Salmon Pastures school and I think Beeley Foundry was at the end of Carbrook Street at the Weedon Street junction. Light Castings folded in 1969.

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So how old do we thing the Beeley Foundry drain cover is then? Without knowing the foundry in question and just from the look of the casting I'm guessing post-war, maybe even quite recent.

They existed in 1925.

Beeley Foundry Co Ltd iron founders, Carbrook Street.

1925 directory.

Edit: Just to add, the Beeley Foundry grates found in my area probably date (or pre-date) when the estate was built, circa 1935-37.

Edited by SteveHB

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So how old do we thing the Beeley Foundry drain cover is then? Without knowing the foundry in question and just from the look of the casting I'm guessing post-war, maybe even quite recent.

Compared.

Myrtle Road.

Nearby

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As I posted much earlier in this thread, it seemed to be common practice for small builders to have inspection chamber covers produced with the name of the house builder cast into the lid.

I think these names would be those of the builders rather than the foundry who produced them.

We have owned three houses, built in 1939, 1957 and 1961, and they all carried the names of local bulders.

HD

Fair enough HD - some of the covers state 'builder' after the name to make it clear to all, and i have tended to avoid posting those. However I suppose that tracing a builder is no less interesting to many on here than tracing a foundry, if a little off topic.

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However I suppose that tracing a builder is no less interesting to many on here than tracing a foundry, if a little off topic.

Perfectly true.

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I came across a drain cover on Durham Rd, its one of the clearest I've seen to say its dated 1897, the other one although not a drain cover harks back to the days of the term "Electric Light" this is on the pavement on Melbourne Avenue.

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That's a new one with me!

Anyone else know anything about the 'Sheffield Telephone Exchange and Electric Light Company' ?

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