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Calvin72

Drainspotting!

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Calvin72
3 hours ago, John Russell said:

Further to my last comment;

The middle of the three grates shown in Calvin's photos here, is hinged, The top and bottom ore 'lift-out'.

And yet all date from the same time. Any thoughts on the reason?

Appreciate you reading the thread John, it's took me back a bit :)

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John Russell
4 hours ago, Calvin72 said:

And yet all date from the same time. Any thoughts on the reason?

Appreciate you reading the thread John, it's took me back a bit :)

The middle grate of the three you posted, Calvin, looks higher capacity (flows more water) than the other two. Could it be that by hinging it, the weight is reduced for anyone wanting to open it? Certainly the hinged version was the 'deluxe edition': a bit more complicated to manufacture and probably a higher price. Today nearly all the heavy duty 'gully grates' (correct name) are hinged and typically cost £50-£150 a piece, depending on strength.

They are usually graded by the weight they can carry. It's a lot more complicated today than it was in the C19th :-)

gully grate 2.jpg

grate loadings.JPG

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Calvin72

The middle of the three 1890 examples only appears today dated from 1890 to 1892. I've often wondered why it was discontinued. There are a good few about, so they have lasted. However a different style was adopted after that by Sheffield Corporation.

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Edmund

These grates would have been mostly installed by builders and developers, not by the corporation itself, who would deal with main roads only.  In 1894 the corporation Highway Stock Account shows that they spent £1,722 18s 7d on "Grates, Frames and Manholes". Although the requirement for grates was specified by the corporation, I'm not sure how detailed the specification would have been, and manufacturers may have had a degree of flexibility as to hinged or lifting. Presumably the text on the grates was to both to deter theft and to reassure the private buyers that there was no risk of the design bringing a dispute with the corporation.

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History dude

I have found a website that uses pictures of drain covers, walls and other things for model making purposes. I believe if you own the copyright on the pictures you could probably upload your pictures to the site and perhaps get paid for them!

If anyone wants to try or is into model making this is the link:

Textures for graphic design

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Calvin72

Out and about delivering flyers today I got to see round the back of properties along Abbeydale Rd. Always interesting for me.

Henry White, Washington Rd.

Darwin & Co, Queen's Foundry.

 

Henry White.jpeg

Darwin Co.jpeg

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Calvin72

Woodrow and Co, London.

Carr Bank Close, Fulwood.

 

Woodrow and Co.jpeg

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Calvin72

E&HO Boundary (any ideas?), adjacent to 294 Handsworth Road.

 

E&HO Boundary.jpeg

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boginspro
On 09/03/2019 at 07:46, Calvin72 said:

E&HO Boundary (any ideas?), adjacent to 294 Handsworth Road.

Just wondered is it lined up along the boundary of the property, if so could it mark where some service to the property becomes the responsibility of the property owner? 

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tozzin

Eckington boundary used to go to White Lane and Handsworth was up to Hurlfield Road. Maybe a link.

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SteveHB

Sorry no photo.
Today at Heeley City Farm Repair Cafe I was talking with SH member andy1702, along came a local lady who asked if  Calvin or himself would have any information regarding a named oblong (star pattern) drain cover that she had found within the area of her property in Heeley.

There did not seem to be any info regarding a "Wm Bush" in their book Drainspotting, or in this topic, so I had a look through the directories.

Bush Wm. mason and bricklayer, 47 Radford Place, White's directory, 1879.
Bush Wm. & Sons Ltd. builders, 97 Gell Street, Kelly's directory, 1925.

 

 

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Calvin72
3 hours ago, SteveHB said:

Sorry no photo.
Today at Heeley City Farm Repair Cafe I was talking with SH member andy1702, along came a local lady who asked if  Calvin or himself would have any information regarding a named oblong (star pattern) drain cover that she had found within the area of her property in Heeley.

There did not seem to be any info regarding a "Wm Bush" in their book Drainspotting, or in this topic, so I had a look through the directories.

Bush Wm. mason and bricklayer, 47 Radford Place, White's directory, 1879.
Bush Wm. & Sons Ltd. builders, 97 Gell Street, Kelly's directory, 1925.

 

 

Hi Steve,

             Sounds like a non-slip sanitation inspection cover which often had 'starfish' patterns for grip. I have seen William Bush on such items but it's not a very common name on Sheffield features.

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Calvin72

W.Simmonett & Son,

Broomgrove Rd, Broomhill.

 

W.Simmonett & Son.jpeg

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SteveHB
3 hours ago, Calvin72 said:

W.Simmonett & Son, Broomgrove Rd, Broomhill.

Kelly's directory, published 1925.

Simmonett Walter, plumber, 43 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow).
Simmonett Walter, plumber, 14 Ellin Street, (Town, Moorfoot area).
Simmonett  Arnold, (junior), plumber, 24 Rushdale Avenue, (Meersbrook).
Simmonett Walter Ernest, (junior) plumber, 26 Murray Road, (Greystones).

White's directory, published 1911.

Simmonett Walter, plumber, house: 37 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow).
Simmonett Walter, plumber, Hermitage Lane, (Town, Moorfoot area).
Simmonett Walter Ernest, (junior) plumber, 26 Murray Road, (Greystones).

White's,  published 1905.

Simmonett Walter (junior), plumber, 37 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow).

 

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Calvin72

Chas Wilson Ld, Atlas Foundry.

In the General Cemetery, near Cemetery Rd entrance.

 

Chas Wilson Ld, Atlas Foundry.jpeg

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MartinR

As a newcomer to the forum I've only just seen this thread.  Earlier SteveHB (19 March 2014) queried why some drains had "TRAFFIC ->" cast on them.  It really did mean to align them in the direction of the vehicular traffic.  The way narrow wheels rolled over a series of narrow slots and didn't go down the gaps.  Not an issue with modern cars, but I well remember the infamous Royds type covers around Millhouses.  If you didn't spot them in time on your bike the front wheel went down and stopped dead.  The result was always scabbed knees and elbows!

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SteveHB
15 hours ago, Calvin72 said:

Chas Wilson Ld, Atlas Foundry.

In the General Cemetery, near Cemetery Rd entrance.

 

Chas Wilson Ld, Atlas Foundry.jpeg

Wilson  Charles,  iron  founder, Atlas  foundry, 54 Staveley  Road,  Sheffield 8. (1911 directory).
Wilson  Charles  Limited,  iron  founders,  Atlas  foundry,  54a Staveley  Road,  Sheffield 8. (1957 dir).

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Calvin72

Hello All, I'm delighted to say that I have been shortlisted for European Heritage Storyteller of the Year for 'Drainspotting'. The link here is the just published submission which formed the final part of the process. There are now just 20 stories left in the contest (of which I am one) and the final 10 are announced later this month. Hopefully there will more updates to follow but thank you very much to all the people who contributed to this long running thread which was part of my story and supporting evidence :)

https://www.europeanheritagedays.com/Story/cfbd0/Drainspotting-%40%40%40-A-European-Story%2c-Made-in-Sheffield^^^

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SteveHB
18 minutes ago, Calvin72 said:

Hello All, I'm delighted to say that I have been shortlisted for European Heritage Storyteller of the Year for 'Drainspotting'. The link here is the just published submission which formed the final part of the process. There are now just 20 stories left in the contest (of which I am one) and the final 10 are announced later this month. Hopefully there will more updates to follow but thank you very much to all the people who contributed to this long running thread which was part of my story and supporting evidence :)

https://www.europeanheritagedays.com/Story/cfbd0/Drainspotting-%40%40%40-A-European-Story%2c-Made-in-Sheffield^^^

Congratulations and good luck

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Jim2000
On 21/01/2014 at 20:15, Calvin72 said:

No idea what this is - never seen another one.

post-20988-0-67050100-1390335260_thumb.jpg

One just like this, pretty sure it’s same year, at the entrance to Lydgate Green, bottom of Lydgate Lane, Crosspool. The Green was donated by JG Graves, there’s an inscription on the adjoining wall from about the same era

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Calvin72

Lots of this thread looks a bit out of date now! There are plenty of these about and all dated between 1932 and 1936. Endcliffe Park has 5 or 6. I'm told they are 'lamp holes' for lowering a light into the sewers etc, but this thread still has several unanswered questions and mysteries :)

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Jim2000

Sorry to arrive so late at the party (probably no beer left either). Have now had chance to look back on this (very long) thread and I see my contribution is old news!

Well done for your Herculean efforts re Drainspotting!

Just to add an extra bit of interest, Roger Brown (see attached ad, Sheff Indep 18 Mar 1848) was the brother of noted Sheffield balloonist Charles Brown and sometimes they ascended together in the balloon - must have been a relief to get some fresh air after messing about with drains, around the times of cholera!

 

 

image.jpeg

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Calvin72

Coupe Brothers, Carlisle Street East. I've seen a small number from this firm but this is by far the best. Top of Crookes Valley Road, inside the old church grounds now converted to flats.

 

Coupe Bros.jpeg

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SteveHB
4 minutes ago, Calvin72 said:

Coupe Brothers, Carlisle Street East. I've seen a small number from this firm but this is by far the best. Top of Crookes Valley Road, inside the old church grounds now converted to flats.

 

Coupe Bros.jpeg

Coupe Brothers, Carting contractors, builders merchants & brick manufacturers 19 Carlisle Street East (1919-1925)

coupe.jpg

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