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Calvin72

Drainspotting!

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I'm very pleased to hear it is doing well for you Andy

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I bought one on Friday from the Sheffield Scene and I called in today and there was just one left.

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I know you have "Corporation of Sheffield" ones but they seem to be 12 slots (unless I've missed some)

Here's an 8 slot from 1890

Spring Hill, S6

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I know you have "Corporation of Sheffield" ones but they seem to be 12 slots (unless I've missed some)

Here's an 8 slot from 1890

Spring Hill, S6

attachicon.gifCorp of Sheff-1890 - Spring Hill.jpg

That's an excellent find Vox! You're right, we haven't previously found that type with 'CORPORATION OF SHEFFIELD' lettering and a date. For the first time ever I actually used the 'spotter's guide' section in the book to check it. Looks like this might be one for the second edition! :)

It's also very interesting that it's on Spring Hill because that's also where a 10 slot design marked 'SHEFFIELD HIGHWAYS' can be found, which may well pre-date the Local Board of Health, meaning that particular casting could have been there since the 1830s. Spring Hill is odd because although it is now one of many similar parallel streets, back in the mid 1800's it was a rural road, pretty much in the middle of nowhere, linking Crookesmoor Road and School Road / Comminside at the place where they are closest together.

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Spring Hill is odd because although it is now one of many similar parallel streets, back in the mid 1800's it was a rural road, pretty much in the middle of nowhere, linking Crookesmoor Road and School Road / Comminside at the place where they are closest together.

Yes, that's what made me think of getting out to have a look around. Glad I did then.

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It's also very interesting that it's on Spring Hill because that's also where a 10 slot design marked 'SHEFFIELD HIGHWAYS' can be found, which may well pre-date the Local Board of Health, meaning that particular casting could have been there since the 1830s.

Here's the Sheffield Highways one. I took this today as well but forgot I'd taken it. :wacko:

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Here's the Sheffield Highways one. I took this today as well but forgot I'd taken it. :wacko:

attachicon.gifSheff Highways - Spring hill.jpg

You're definitely getting the hang of this drainspotting thing.

If you want a challenge... see if you can find an Attercliffe / Darnall Local Board cover. In theory it should exist, but we haven't found one yet. Maybe they just put 'Sheffield' on them. But if you do find one with Atercliffe lettering I'll send you a free copy of the book :)

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Off darn' Cliffe for me then. :)

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Off darn' Cliffe for me then. :)

The Holy Grail of Drainspotting! We know that Attercliffe-cum-Darnall Local Board existed, but we don't know if it made drain covers. I only know of around eight definite Sheffield Local Board covers and it is true that less survives on the Attercliffe side of the City from the mid 19th century. It is possible that they existed and that therefore one may still be in place on a small cobbled back street somewhere. Frankly I think the excitement of finding one may be too much!

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I know you have "Corporation of Sheffield" ones but they seem to be 12 slots (unless I've missed some)

Here's an 8 slot from 1890

Spring Hill, S6

attachicon.gifCorp of Sheff-1890 - Spring Hill.jpg

There is one of these just off South Road, which I only noticed a few weeks ago. We have found a very small number of that older style with dates on (from between 1890 and 1912 I think). It is interesting for a lot of reasons! A lot of the chronology of 'Drainspotting' hinges on 1890 and I would like to call on people here who have access to online newspapers, Council papers and various archives to try to find something for me :) . Roughly speaking between the 1830's and around 1860 we have the Local Board of Health and the Highways Board installing covers. Then installations from c.1860 to c.1890 seem to have made by the Corporation and many survive, which are heavy set and in the Local Board style. They are embossed either 'Sheffield Corporation' or 'Corporation Sheffield' with one word at the top and one at the bottom. Now the mystery! In 1890 there suddenly appear at least four variations, some slight, but one or two very different styles indeed. It looks to me as if there was some sort of trial of different kinds of cover in that year. If so then that must figure in the press or official papers somewhere. One of the styles that started that year became the ten slot 'Sheffield Corporation' style which remained until the late 1920's (dating ranges from 1890 to 1929), whereas one very different style with vertical slots only lasted until 1892. At the same time as this experimentation began then so did dating of covers which never happened before 1890, but then continued until 1929.

So was there a trial between 1890 and 1892? And did the cover that became the standard Corporation design win out? It looks like it, but is there a record somewhere...?

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Drainspotting has been chosen by BBC Radio Sheffield as one of it's 'Stories of 2014' ! ^_^

I will be on Toby Foster's breakfast show on Friday around 8:30 during their review of the year.

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I just wondered today:

Back in my childhood, (1950's) these were called "Fever Grates" by all us kids

Would that be because playing near them, one may catch fever, or was it because they were associated with the sanitary reforms brought about after the Cholera Epidemic.(ie sort of "anti-fever grates") - Not a question that can be answered definitively I suppose.

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I just wondered today:

Back in my childhood, (1950's) these were called "Fever Grates" by all us kids

Would that be because playing near them, one may catch fever, or was it because they were associated with the sanitary reforms brought about after the Cholera Epidemic.(ie sort of "anti-fever grates") - Not a question that can be answered definitively I suppose.

Good question! I've never heard them called that before, so my guess is it's a left over from the drain building that got done as a reult of the cholera outbreaks.

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Here's another one that's not in the book. New discovery of a Corporation style standard 10 slot design but with a private maker's name.

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It's been mentioned on here before somewhere that George Harvey and Co. and Charlton Ironworks are one and the same. This one looks like it dates from the early years of the 20th century.

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I just wondered today:

Back in my childhood, (1950's) these were called "Fever Grates" by all us kids

Would that be because playing near them, one may catch fever, or was it because they were associated with the sanitary reforms brought about after the Cholera Epidemic.(ie sort of "anti-fever grates") - Not a question that can be answered definitively I suppose.

I go along with the catching fever theory.

In the 1950's we enjoyed some very warm summers with little rain to flush the grates out. The stagnant water in the grates used to smell rank or perhaps the traps dried out completely allowing sewer smells to escape.

We were certainly told by our mothers not to play near them, which was a problem because the best places to gather molten tar on a lollypop stick was often around the grates.

Why we would want to collect nasty big globs of tar on a stick now escapes me.

I know that walking back in with tar on your clothes caused a certain amount of consternation.

Tar on fingers could be removed by application of margarine or butter if you were posh.

We may not have had Playstations but every hour of the day was dedicated to such useful pursuits.

HD

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It's been mentioned on here before somewhere that George Harvey and Co. and Charlton Ironworks are one and the same. This one looks like it dates from the early years of the 20th century.

Are you sure it's GEORGE Harvey? If it says 'GEORGE' then that wouldn't fit the space and if it says 'GEO' then that would leave a space too big when compared to the space between '& CO'. I know the lettering sometimes goes a bit wonky etc, but this one seems particularly bad.

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Just received BBC Radio Sheffield's " I can't believe what I'm hearing " news story of 2014! I managed to get in a quick mention of this site.

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2 more, both at property on Western Road.

S Taylor, Builder, Crookes, Sheffield

Alco, Sheffield. Made in England

Relatively modern I would think

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2 more, both at property on Western Road.

S Taylor, Builder, Crookes, Sheffield

attachicon.gifS Taylor Builder Crookes. - Western Rd.jpg

Alco, Sheffield. Made in England

attachicon.gifAlco Sheff - Western Rd.jpg

Relatively modern I would think

Good for playing marbles on though. We never gave the grates a thought when we used them every dinnertime and playtime.

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Blimey! I'd forgotten about that game. :)

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This isn't to old, I didn't take the photos so sorry about the quality of the full view one. Its in a back yard on Laverdene Close.

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The Alco is or was part of the Arnold Laver Company that was situated on Midhill Rd up to the 70s or 80s.

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