Jump to content
Calvin72

Drainspotting!

Recommended Posts

As I pointed out earlier in the thread, these covers are electricity section boxes with a "diving bell" inverted cover underneath to protect the interconnections between different power networks. The variant with ventilation slots are usually above cable joint pits to enable some cooling of the cables. I don't think they have any connection with the tramway system which had the upright green section boxes.

HD

I think I'm coming out in agreement with Hilldweller on this one. If these patented covers are from the 30s then they are a bit too new to be involved with the electric tramways, which would have needed their infrastructure in place from the beginning. It is about the right time for Corporation electricity supplies to be reaching more and more properties though.

There are very similar things in the pavement, which are clearly marked Corporation Tramways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Came across these three covers on Warrington Rd today, seems the two without a date, both have the same fault in the casting as they have both cracked more or less in the same place.

Sorry about my feet they tend to force their way into shot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The two marked 'Sheffield Corporation' and 'Corporation Sheffield' are certainly pre-1890, i think maybe 1870s. There are a few about and there is a perfect example next to the Cathedral at the beginning of St James' Street, many are worn away now but these are in pretty good condition!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darwin and Co. , Queen's Foundry..?

On Psalter Lane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wanted to make sure you were aware of the two Sheffield Highways covers side by side on the road down to Forge Dam. There was another one a little further along that I think may also be a Highways cover but is now rubbed clean. I didn't have anything with me to photograph them I'm sorry to say.

Hi saw,

We will be going on a field trip to the area soon - Can you point us in the direction of your covers please? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now this seems to be T.L Slater, Shelf Street (?) - I thought it must be Sheaf at first but ...

On Scargill Croft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now this seems to be T.L Slater, Shelf Street (?) - I thought it must be Sheaf at first but ...

No.11 Shelf Street, St Mary's:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now this seems to be T.L Slater, Shelf Street (?) - I thought it must be Sheaf at first but ...

On Scargill Croft.

It is not a drain cover, these have glass set into the iron castings, they were designed to allow light into downstairs premises.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not a drain cover, these have glass set into the iron castings, they were designed to allow light into downstairs premises.

Loathe as i am to re-name the thread it has long since wandered around a bit. Pavement feature spotting!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No.11 Shelf Street, St Mary's:

attachicon.gifShelf street.png

Slater Thomas L builder, 11 Shelf street & works, Lenton street, (1925).

Slater Thomas L. slater* & c, 11 Shelf street (1901, 1905).

Listed occupation*

Edited by SteveHB
added to

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wanted to make sure you were aware of the two Sheffield Highways covers side by side on the road down to Forge Dam. There was another one a little further along that I think may also be a Highways cover but is now rubbed clean. I didn't have anything with me to photograph them I'm sorry to say.

We've been to investigate this today and it's even more interesting than you thought. You've actually found something that (as far as we know) is unique!

The two covers side by side are indeed Highways, but not Sheffield Highways. The lettering is almost worn off them both, but there is just enough visible on one of them to show they are actually ECCLESALL HIGHWAYS. They are also a unique design, with the slots running vertically rather horizontally, as they are on the Sheffield Local Board ones.

The one on it's own a bit further down the hill is also interesting. The lettering is totally worn away, but it's certainly in the style of the Sheffield Local Board. Here's a photo of the worn example from Forge Dam.

And below is a known Local Board (it's just readable) on the corner of Pear Street.

Do they look the same?

So the question now is how come there is a Sheffield Local Board cover right beside two Ecclesall Highways ones? Does this mean the Highways were put in before Sheffield stretched to this area and the Local Board came along later?

Answers on the proverbial postcard please!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As Andy hints i think the 'Ecclesall Highways' cover dates to before Sheffield Corporation came into being in 1843. I know old maps show Ecclesall Bierlow area (parish i think). So i can't see how this cover can be from after Incorporation? All in all another interesting day!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that's quite a turn up for the books ain't it? I'm a bit stumped by those Ecclesall Highways covers. It suggests that they were installed by an authority other than the Sheffield Local Board/Corporation. Clearly if we are talking about a mid 19th century date then that part of what is now Sheffield would have fallen outside of the municipal boundary I'm guessing. Ecclesall Bierlow is indeed where they would have been but I'm really unsure as to any conclusions can be drawn. Probably a good search of the local newspapers for any reference to Ecclesall Highways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are several mentions of the Surveyors of the Highways for Ecclesall pre-1843. This is the earliest I could find:

There's a saying - "plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose" (Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr in the January 1849 issue of his journal Les Guêpes.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that's quite a turn up for the books ain't it? I'm a bit stumped by those Ecclesall Highways covers. It suggests that they were installed by an authority other than the Sheffield Local Board/Corporation. Clearly if we are talking about a mid 19th century date then that part of what is now Sheffield would have fallen outside of the municipal boundary I'm guessing. Ecclesall Bierlow is indeed where they would have been but I'm really unsure as to any conclusions can be drawn. Probably a good search of the local newspapers for any reference to Ecclesall Highways.

Not exactly sure what to look for, this is the earliest reference I came across.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of the National Archives:

"The Highway Act 1835 (5 & 6 Will IV c.50) defines highways as all roads, bridges (not being county bridges), carriageways, cartways, horseways, bridleways, footways, causeways, churchways and pavements. Navigable rivers and ferries are also public highways. A highway may exist by prescription, uninterrupted use since time immemorial, by Act of Parliament or by dedication. A dedication exists where a person expressly or tacitly throws open for public use a road on his land, and the public assent to or avail themselves of the dedication.

Section 23 of the 1835 Act provided that no road or other way was to be deemed a highway maintainable at public expense unless notice of dedication had been given in writing to the parish surveyor. The form of such notification was printed as a schedule to the Act

Turnpike roads did not fall within the operation of the Highway Act 1835. Most were transferred in the latter part of the nineteenth century from turnpike trusts to Highway Boards."

"A treatise on the law of ways: including highways, turnpike roads and tolls etc" by H Woolrych was written in 1829, published 1834 and gives an insight into the laws applicable at the time - see page 82 for drainage information:

Law of Ways - Humphry Woolrych

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi saw,

We will be going on a field trip to the area soon - Can you point us in the direction of your covers please? :)

Bit of an aside really, but this lane and bridge over the Porter is believed to mark a very old crossing point. There's a theory gaining ground that the Roman road from Brough to Templeborough didn't go via Long Causey but via Wynyards Nick, past Carl Wark, towards Ringinglow and crossed the Porter at this point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bit of an aside really, but this lane and bridge over the Porter is believed to mark a very old crossing point. There's a theory gaining ground that the Roman road from Brough to Templeborough didn't go via Long Causey but via Wynyards Nick, past Carl Wark, towards Ringinglow and crossed the Porter at this point.

It certainly looks like an ancient crossing to me. It would be an excellent place to get across the Porter too. I'm guessing this little road would have been a lot busier when the old water wheel (which I assume was at the end of the long mill race) was working. It's very green now, but I bet it was quite industrial at one point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It certainly looks like an ancient crossing to me. It would be an excellent place to get across the Porter too. I'm guessing this little road would have been a lot busier when the old water wheel (which I assume was at the end of the long mill race) was working. It's very green now, but I bet it was quite industrial at one point.

Indeed Andy. The wheelpit is still visible behind the cafe, and the tailrace rejoins the river just above the bridge. Then there's the masterpiece of water management in the long goit that runs alongside the path and feeds water into Wire Mill Dam, which had two large waterwheels driving at various times a wire mill and a steel rolling mill. And overlooking the bridge is the former button factory, so this must have been the centre of a very busy industrial area. Perhaps this accounts for the Ecclesall gratings, as it must have been quite an important highway from early in the industrial revolution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without reading back through all the previous posts, I don't know if we have examples of these.

Do they add anything ?

Walter Street

Sheffield Corporation 1907

Bilston Street

Sheffield Corporation 1907

Both off Burton Street.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1907 is not a very common year - Sheffield Corporation dates we have go from 1890 to 1926. There are fewer from the first few years of the 20th Century than the last few of the 19th.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed Andy. The wheelpit is still visible behind the cafe, and the tailrace rejoins the river just above the bridge. Then there's the masterpiece of water management in the long goit that runs alongside the path and feeds water into Wire Mill Dam, which had two large waterwheels driving at various times a wire mill and a steel rolling mill. And overlooking the bridge is the former button factory, so this must have been the centre of a very busy industrial area, and all built by Thomas Boulsover with the proceeds of his silver-plated buttons! Perhaps this accounts for the Ecclesall gratings, as it must have been quite an important highway from early in the industrial revolution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without reading back through all the previous posts, I don't know if we have examples of these.

Do they add anything ?

Walter Street

Sheffield Corporation 1907

attachicon.gifS C 1907 walter St.jpg

Bilston Street

Sheffield Corporation 1907

attachicon.gifS C 1907 Bilston st.jpg

Both off Burton Street.

Those two photos do actually show something interesting. They must have been made from a mould that in turn was formed around the same pattern. Note how the 'I' in 'CORPORATION' is equally crooked in both cases.

Although they would pour lots of castings together into green sand moulds, maybe they only had one pattern and made every one from that. I expected them to have at least two or three patterns and a team of mould-makers, but maybe it was a slower process than I initially thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm of the view that (as expressed previously by someone) the lettering was put in separately. If you look at the two examples, the letter "A" is bang central on one, but slightly to the left on the other. It would make sense to have standard patterns for the covers, so that they could be used for different Authorities, and interchangeable lettering to complete the different orders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×