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Calvin72

Drainspotting!

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Amazing amount of interest from the national media today as a result of The Star piece. Many of tomorrow's nationals are covering the story and i will be on Toby Foster's show on Radio Sheffield 7-30 on Monday morning. I am asking all the media to mention this site and i am pleased that The Star have done so.

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Glad of the coverage in the Daily Mail but there are many errors including me being part of 'Streets Ahead' when it is the potential enemy!

Not sure about the 'Sherlock of the sewers' either!

But best of all i am finally, and i quote, a "Yorkshireman"!

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Nice one Calvin!! :)

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Still no word from the council about the vandals at AMEY though. It's a month since I e-mailed them and nothing back yet. Also that useless Labour councilor woman at nether Edge, who said she'd get back to me hasn't done either!

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Still no word from the council about the vandals at AMEY though. It's a month since I e-mailed them and nothing back yet. Also that useless Labour councilor woman at nether Edge, who said she'd get back to me hasn't done either!

The Star have quoted Jack Scott from the Council who says that some pavement furniture will go - so listing is the way.

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I don't think the arrow is actually the government mark, common on wartime issued equipment. In this case I think it's just an imperfection in the casting or a mark that has been scratched into the casting accidentally somehow over the passage of time. As the covers are cast iron, it would be very difficult (maybe even impossible) to stamp a mark into them after manufacture as they would likely shatter. Also if it was made at the casting stage it would stand proud like the letters, not be recessed.

The different numerals in the second part of the dates shows how the lettering was detachable from the original patterns the green sand castings were made from. These letters and numbers, known as pattern makers letters, were available in different sizes and designs. Obviously be the twenties the foundry had run out of the original ones!

I don't think the arrow is an O.S. mark, it would be a bit more defined than it is BUT it's not an imperfection in casting either, I'm still in the Government court, you can see it's been worn over the years .

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The seriousness of the Sheffield Star report has given way to 'silly season' stories about me personally, but it's worth it if the story gets people looking and thinking about their surroundings and local history.

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How does it feel to be the worlds first, and only, drainspotter Calvin? :)

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Discussing Drainspotting with Toby Foster on BBC Radio Sheffield this morning (begins at 35:55 and lasts around 7 minutes).

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01t7wdp

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I'll go along with Hildweller on what the small features are. I think stop taps are a spot on explanation.

The 'CORPORATION OF SHEFFIELD' drain is interesting. Previously we've found one with 'CORPORATION' at the top with nothing at the bottom and wondered what it was. Now it looks like it was one of these with the 'OF SHEFFIELD' bit worn off.

So if you find a 12 slot 'CORPORATION OF SHEFFIELD' it's definitely sometime pre-1892. And if you find a 12 slot 'SHEFFIELD CORPORATION' it's definitely post-1890. we're just not sure which was in use during 1891.

Calvin, for your next challenge you need to find something dated 1891!

We're now getting so much

information on this I'm starting to think we should write a small book or something.

Is this Sheffield Corporation 1891? Never seen another one if so.

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Discussing Drainspotting with Toby Foster on BBC Radio Sheffield this morning (begins at 35:55 and lasts around 7 minutes).

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01t7wdp

Heard it this morning Calvin on my way to work!

You gave a good account of yourself and Sheffield history too.

Well done Calvin! :)

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Just listened. Great work.

Tsavo, who thought I was bonkers, when I said I was going to do the best A-Z of old Sheffield pubs, would be proud. He didn't think that would work but he and Dobbed joined in posting it up and it's improved into a remarkable resource. Hopefully, your drain research will go on to catalogue and encourage research.

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Maybe someone should catalogue the oldest trees in Sheffield!

We've plenty to get through!!

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"Calvin’s interest in old drains was piqued one day when he was walking down Palm Street, Walkley, and saw three drains embossed with ‘Sheffield Local Board’.

The discovery left history boffins on the Sheffield History website – www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk – baffled, so they set about finding out more.

Research revealed the Sheffield Local Board was set up in 1838 after the cholera outbreak – and the drains are evidence of the first attempt at a proper sanitation system in Sheffield.

“We have reason to believe these were installed in the late 1840s. They’re certainly around 160 years old,” said Calvin.

“In drain spotting terms, this is the most historic street in Sheffield.” "

Star

This got me thinking, so, I turned to the Pubs list (as you do) :

Summary of

Palm Tree Tavern - 35 Palm Street, Walkley

1871 - 79 William Thorpe (Beerhouse)

1901 John Joel

1937 – 1944 John Carty [ beer retailer only ]

1948 Frederick Stevens [ beer retailer only ]

1951 Ernest Vickers

So, Palm Street existed in 1871 but looking at the 1855 map there's no sign of anything other than Walkley Tan Yard - Maps (sure someone will repair that if it doesn't work).

Can we narrow down the date range ? Are there any data stones on Palm Street to help us ? What is the first map with South Road and Palm Street shown ? What is the status of Palm Street in 1861 census (if it exists at all) and in 1871 - the extent of 1871 details may show partial building on Palm Street, or it may be complete. To my mind you begin building at the bottom and work your way up the non-inconsiderable hill, but this may, or indeed, may not be true etc etc

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White's directory 1856; Palm street, Freedom Hill, Walkley, there appears to be four listings on Palm Street.

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Very interesting, Thank you Steve. So, no Freedom Hill or Palm Street on map of 1855 (probably surveyed earlier 1854 ?) and four properties by 1856; which kind of pins down the earliest point at which drains would have been installed.

White's directory 1856; Palm street, Freedom Hill, Walkley, there appears to be four listings on Palm Street.

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Can we narrow down the date range ? Are there any data stones on Palm Street to help us ? What is the first map with South Road and Palm Street shown ? What is the status of Palm Street in 1861 census (if it exists at all) and in 1871 - the extent of 1871 details may show partial building on Palm Street, or it may be complete. To my mind you begin building at the bottom and work your way up the non-inconsiderable hill, but this may, or indeed, may not be true etc etc

See post #16 here:

Palm Street

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I suppose it's a wonder these covers have survived. During a scrap metal shortage some years ago there was a spate of manhole, drain and other covers disappearing in the night, and the council and utilities couldn't keep up with replacing them.

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I hope Calvin72 takes this opportunity to write a book about this subject and don't let the chance "Go Down The Drain"

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I have taken a bit of a chance at dating the 'Sheffield Local Board' covers as 1840s-1850s, but the cholera outbreak was 1838 and we have evidence of the road being in place by 1856 (and houses being constructed by 1853 according to the suicide report) so i think i am safe! But in all seriousness an exact date would be great (not grate as the tabloids would say!).

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Very interesting, Thank you Steve. So, no Freedom Hill or Palm Street on map of 1855 (probably surveyed earlier 1854 ?) and four properties by 1856; which kind of pins down the earliest point at which drains would have been installed.

Could what is now Palm Street have been a path before it was a road, or indeed had any houses along it?

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Doesn't appear to be a whole lot of anything ... I know the area well, born Birkendale, lived on Hadfield Road and also Greenhow Street.

Could what is now Palm Street have been a path before it was a road, or indeed had any houses along it?

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