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A Mystery: Ellis Family / Mosborough Hill House Research


Guest lanerellis
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Guest lanerellis

Hi GFS, and many thanks for your fascinating replies. How wonderful to have the owner of Mosborough Hill House taking part in this discussion. When your house went on the market in 2010 I found 10 photos online posted by the real estate firm, and have them in my collection. I'll bet you have them as well, but let me know if you'd like a copy of them.

I'm happy that with the home came all of the old papers you mentioned. They must be quite fascinating. So there aren't any mentions of the Swallow or Staniforth families in the documents? Or just no Ellis'? Please share anything else you find that might be relevant or interesting.

Your mention that there is sometimes confusion between your house and the property around The Ridgeway Arms pub seems to lend support to my theory that there may have been two places refereed to as Mosborough Hill House over time.

Re-reading your messages, I just now looked at the map labeled "Map 6" in my original post, and in this 18th century map the area where your house is located was noted as Moor Hill, while the area where The Ridgeway Arms pub is located was noted as Moor Top.

Some additional thoughts:

If my ancestor John Ellis senior was listed as "of High Lane" in 1777 Hallamshire apprentice record, would this mean he resided along High Lane and exclude his residence at the Mosborough Hill House located across High Lane and on the northeast of Moor Valley road, nearer to Moor Hole? I believe so.

There are apparently two different buildings that over the centuries have been called Mosborough Hill House. The one now commonly known as Mosborough Hill House, located across High Lane and on the northeast of Moor Valley road, nearer to Moor Hole (lets call this MHH1), where you live, and the one now known as The Ridgeway Arms, which was previously called The Crofts public house and before that Mosborough Hill House (lets call this MHH2), according to the late Mosborough area researcher David English:

"The old Mosborough Hill House was converted into The Croft in 1987 and then renamed 'The Ridgeway Arms'." (Source: History of Mosborough - David English http://www.abdecor.co.uk/mosborough/history/dehist/dehist31.htmm )

In George Foster's 1886 book about the history of Mosborough he seems to have written mostly general descriptions of residences when he identified the primary houses of each period in Mosborough's history, so when he wrote "Fist pediod, 1800 to 1825: John Ellis’ residence at the top of Mosbro’ Moor," did he mean literally the area around the highest point of Mosbro' Moor? If so, I think that it points more to the building now called The Ridgeway Arms or the L-shaped building next to it. Your Mosborough Hill House appears to be located in a spot over 100 feet lower in elevation than the Ridgeway Arms buildings, formerly called Mosborough Hill House.

On another front, I did contact the Hallamshire Company of Cutlers in Sheffield and got a scan of the Freedom paper showing the mark of my fifth-great-grandfather John Ellis, whose residence I'm trying to pin down.

Attached is the document from 1777 recording John Ellis senior's entry into being a sickle maker.

He would have spent up to seven years as an apprentice before being granted his "Freedom" and mark from the prestigious Hallamshire Company of Cutlers in Sheffield.

Here is my citation for the record:

John Ellis senior Hallamshire Cutlers Company freedom document, marked as page or entry 20 at the top of the page:

John Ellis the Son of William Ellis and Apprentice of William Staniforth of the parish of Eckington in the County of Derby, Sicklesmith, was admitted a Freeman of the COMPANY of CUTLERS in Hallamshire, in the County of York, the twenty sixth Day of September in the Year of our LORD one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven, and had the Mark figured in the Margin assigned to him to mark his sickles during his Life.

[The mark in the left margin consists of two fleurs-de-lis, one on top of the other. The document is stamped in the upper left corner "7, Nine Pence Quire, B"]



Thanks again for your kind help, GFS and all Sheffield History posters.

Cheers,
Lane

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Lane,

Thanks for your update.

I have checked all the old photo copies of old maps and the one from 1875 - 1895 aligns with all the old legal docs that show that our house is Mosborough Hill house. The other 4 maps I have from 1898-1908 , 1922-1931 , 1950-1971 and 1984-1991 also support the name.

I also have a handful of legal documents relating to the sale and purchase of the house, but the oldest is from 1926. Most have hand drawn maps and again they too refer to this property as Mosborough Hill House. There is also reference to payments made by Thomas Henry Fox to Sir George Reresby Sitwell.

Bullets points from docs etc.

1790 August 30 - Elijah Naboth Staniforth was born.

1819 Mosborough Hill House was built by Elijah Naboth Staniforth Esq a sicklemaker.

Elijah Naboth and Ann Staniforth had 8 children from 1820 - 1835 with the last also beign nbamed Elijah Naboth Staniforth ( the younger ) !!!

1841 Richard Swallow Esq came to reside at Mosborough Hill house which he bought some years later.

1842 Elijah Naboth Staniforth ( the elder) died aged 52 .

1879 Mosborough Hill House was extended. There is a nice roof window with dates and names above where one walks thru into what I assume is the extension.

Census 1881 showed John F swallow and Mary E swallow plus staff lived at Mosbor Hill house.

1891 Kelly's directory Derbyshire shows John swallow esq of Mosbor Hill house.

There is loads more once probate of John Fell swallow and Mary Ellen Swallow, but its largely about various owners like Thomas Henry Fox and Mary Elizabeth Rhodes.. Mary was from somewhere known as White Lane Farm Gleadless..

I will read others bits and pieces to see if anything is worth flagging to you.

I have started restoring loads of the house and garden, but still need to locate where the ice well / house was to start that project. The house has some much to offer and , with luck, will ensure I am kept busy and happy for many many years.

Regards

Graham

PS If there is anything specific you need to know please let me know as I am not, as you can see, a history person.

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Guest lanerellis

Lane,

Thanks for your update.

[...]

Regards

Graham

PS If there is anything specific you need to know please let me know as I am not, as you can see, a history person.

Hi Graham,

Thanks for your excellent message and for taking the time to look through your fascinating records and for typing up those interesting items and sharing them.

Since the 1990s I've been researching the Staniforth families of Eckington Parish and surrounding parishes, trying to connect the line of my fourth-great-grandmother Olive Staniforth (baptized December 27, 1780 at Eckington, buried November 19, 1805 in the Eckington churchyard, the daughter of Luke Staniforth who was baptized on December 27, 1737 at Eckington, buried May 18, 1809 at the Eckington churchyard, married Margaret Fields at Eckington on October 14, 1762) to the well-established "main" line of Staniforths that include the Elijah Naboth Staniforth who built your house.

Olive Staniforth married my fourth-great-grandfather John Ellis junior at nearby Clowne Parish on November 6, 1802, and it is this couple -- along with John's father John Ellis senior -- who are the reason I started this message, as he was recorded as living at his "residence at the top of Mosbro’ Moor."

I've corresponded with Rosamund Du Cane, the author of a most excellent book about the Staniforth family that I would highly recommend to you, "Sicklesmiths & Spear Carriers," as it details the lives of the ancestors of the apparent builder of your house Elijah Naboth Staniforth.

I remember when I first encountered the unusual name Elijah Naboth Staniforth while transcribing all the Staniforths, Ellises, and other names in my ancestry from the Eckinging parish record microfilms, and he's always fascinated me, so it's exciting to read your message noting that he built Mosborough Hill House in 1819.

Here is some of what I have in my records about Elijah Naboth Staniforth -- basically just transcriptions I've made from parish registers, Bishop's Transcripts, and other information I've come across:

---

Elijah Naboth STANIFORTH Family :

Thomas STANIFORTH of Mosbro

Son Elijah Naboth to Luke STANIFORTH of Mosbro Moor 1805-1813

Elijah Naboth STANIFORTH Esq. "built Mosbro’ Hall house."

IGI : Elija Naboth STANIFORTH m. Dec 25 1816 to Ann STANIFORTH at Cathedral Saint Peter, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England

My parish record transcriptions:

B(aptism) p(age)68#552 Nov 9 1817, b.(aptism) Oct 5, Eleanor, to Elijah Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, (abode) Moor Hole (?), (occupation) sicklesmith

B p81#660 Nov 29 1818, b. Nov 5, Luke, to Elijah Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, Mosbro Moor, sicklesmith

B p103#833 Jun 18 1820, b. May 22, Mary Ann, to Elija Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, Moor Hole (?), sicklesmith

1823 B p143,1140 Jan 5, b. Nov 9 1822, Sarah, to Elija Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, Moor Hole, sicklesmith [Note: married Thomas KIRKBY - http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/t/a/y/Jeffrey-Taylor-West-Yorkshire/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0859.html]

1824 B p166,1341 Jul 18, b. Jun 21, George, to Elisha Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, Moor Hole, sicklesmith

1826 B p199,1596 Aug 6, b. Jul 7, Joseph, to Elija Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, Mosbro Moor, sicklesmith

1826 B p199,1597 Aug 6, b. Jul 7, Elizabeth, to Elija Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, Mosbro Moor, sicklesm.

B 1832 p292,2334 Jun 24, b. 18 Feb, Thomas, to Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, Mosbro Moor, sickle maker

B 1834 p19,154 Mar 15, b. Jan 17, Harriett, to Elijah Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, Mosbro Moor, sicklemaker

B 1835 p43,342 Oct 25, b. 20 Sep, Elija Naboth, to Elija Naboth and Ann STANIFORTH, Mosbro Moor, sickle manufacturer

D 1847 p11,83 Elijah Naboth STANIFORTH, Mosbro Moor Hole, Mar 28, 11

IGI : Elija STANIFORTH b. Jan 20 1811 Cathedral Saint Peter, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, parents Thomas STANIFORTH and Mary

1790 B Aug 30 Elisha-Naboth to Thomas and Mary STANIFORTH

1784 B Mar 21 Naboth to John and Ann STANIFORTH

D 1842 p274,2188 Elijah Naboth STANIFORTH, Moor Hole, Dec 3, 52

D 1857 p?,850 Elijah Naboth STANIFORTH, Mosbro Moor Hole, May 4, 7

1787 D May 3 Naboth s Thomas STANIFORTH

B p38,302 Oct 10 1849 Elijah Naboth to George and Jane STANIFORTH, High Lane, farmer

---

Not much, but perhaps this can help shed some light on the family for you, and as I mentioned Rosamund Du Cane's book tells much more, including the family connection to Mayor Staniforth of Liverpool. I may have more information about Elijah Naboth's line -- I'll have a look.

Yes, there is no doubt that you live in what has been called Mosborough Hill House since it was built in 1819. It also seems likely that before that time, beginning as early as 1707, the building that is now The Ridgeway Arms pub or the farmhouse building it may have replaced, were known as Mosborough Hill House, after 1819 to be known as the "old Mosborough Hill House," it seems. That might explain references to both different places as Mosborough Hill House, although since 1819 is seems there's little doubt that the primary resident bearing the name is the house you now live in.

I also found the records you noted mentioned the Fox family interesting. I have distant Fox relatives who lived in Mosborough. Although I don't have any Thomas Henry Fox in my records, I do find this in a 1940 London Times newspaper entry:

In the Matter of an Act of Parliament entitled "An Act for dividing and inclosing the commons and waste lands common fields and mesne inclosures within the parish of Beighton in the county of Derby."

TAKE notice that application will be made under the above mentioned Act by us the undersigned Thomas Henry Fox of Mosbrough Hill, Mosbrough in the county of Derby, Farmer, James Hounsfield of The Farm, Hackenthorpe, in the county of Derby aforesaid, Farmer, and Edwin Peat, of "Longfield" Halfway in the said county, Farmer (being respectively owners and proprietors of lands and estates subject to payment of Corn Rent in the said parish who are assessed to Poor Rates at the sum of 40 Pounds and upwards respectively) at the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be held in and for the county of Derby on the 3rd day of April 1940 to have two persons named and appointed by the Justices then and there assembled to be together with a third person to be named and chosen by such two persons Arbitrators or Referees for inquiring into and ascertaining the average price of a Winchester Bushel of good marketable wheat within the said county of Derby for the fourteen years then last past to the intent that the amount of the said Corn Rents may be re-ascertained and declared pursuant to the above mentioned Act. - Dated this eighth day of January 1940.

THOS. HY. FOX.

JAMES HOUNSFIELD.

EDWIN PEAT.

---

I transcribed that from here: www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/34773/pages/334/page.pdf‎

Some additional noted from my records also mention Elijah Naboth Staniforth, which I'll post here now in case they are of interest:

---

1797 Sheffield and vicinity directory lists a:

Staniforth, Luke, sicklesmith, Mosbro-moor-hall

Fitzwilliam Arms: Now gone the site is occupied by private dwellings. It stood on Mosbrough Moor almost opposite the British Oak public house. It derived its name from Earl Fitzwilliam who owned lands in the vicinity. There were very few buildings on the Moor and the Staniforth family, who were sicklesmiths lived nearby. In 1826 George Staniforth occupied the licensed Fitzwilliam Arms and his widow carried on after his death.

In addition to owning Mosbro' Moor Hall, the family also owned Mosbro' Hill where at least one generation was reared. One daughter married John Whitaker, tailor of High Lane, and another Thomas Kirkby shoemaker, also of High Lane.

John Staniforth, more generally known as " Dusty," resided at Mosbro Moor Hall and kept a pack of harriers. Henry Rodgers, sicklesmith, of Ridgeway was a great man with him on Leld days. It is related that on one occasion they swam the river at Bedgrave Mill after the pack. To-day, the business and the name are perpetuated in the firm of Thomas Staniforth and Co. Ltd., of Hackenthorpe.

---------------------

William STANIFORTH

* BIRTH: of Mosbro Hall, Eckington, Derbyshire, England

* CHRISTENING: 25 Mar 1641, St Peter And St Paul, Eckington, Derby, England

Father: John STANIFORTH

Mother: Sarah

Family 1 : Mary

* MARRIAGE: ABT 1670, Of, Eckington, Derby, England

1. Mary STANIFORTH

------------------

John Parker, Esq. of Norton, bapt. 18 Aup. 1IÍG4, m. Mary, dau. of William Staniforth, Esq. of Mosborough Hall, ??. Derby, and was father of John Parker, Esq. of Graystoncs, in the parish of Sheffield, and of Woodthorpe, in the parish of Hausworth, 6. in 1700. He m. Mary, dau. of Samuel Staniforth, Esq. of Mosborough Hall, and had issue,

i. John, his heir.

i. Sarah, m. to George Woodhead, Esq. of Highfleld, near Sheffield.

---------------------

STANIFORTH Elijah Naboth Esq. built Mosbrough and Mushroom Hall 1800-25 period.

---------------------

STANIFORTH Samuel Esq. of Mosbrough Hall, died 1812. Buried in Eckington churchyard

---------------------

Will of Elizabeth Poynton

Will of Elizabeth Poynton of Ulley in the Parish of Treeton in the County of York Widow Proved 02 June 1827

I give unto John Staniforth of Beighton in the County of Derby Gent all Messuages, Tenements or Dwelling Houses and Outbuildings situate and being at Mosbrough Moor in the Parish of Eckington in the County of Derby now in the occupation of George Booth

About 1630 Mosbrough Hall was the the occasional residence of Mrs. Elizabeth Poynton, nee Staniforth. Source Old Halls of Derbyshire

---------------------

Note: The Staniforths were a wealthy family whose money was accrued from scythe and sickle manufacturing. They owned lands in Eckington and Mosborough and one branch lived in Mosborough Hall.

-----------------

1692 D(burial) 1692/02/13 STANIFORTH Alice Bu(burial) dau(daughter) Wm Staniforth of Mosbrough More

1813 D Maria Staniforth Mosbro 66 (age) 29/7/1813

1817 B(baptism) Eleanor STANIFORTH Elijah Naboth & Ann (parents) Mosbro Sicklesmith 9/11/1817 b5/10/1817

1818 D Mary Staniforth Mosbro 73 9/9/1818

1822 B Sarah STANIFORTH Elijah Naboth & Ann Mosbro Sicklesmith 5/1/1823 b29/11/1822

1824 B George STANIFORTH Elijah Naboth & Ann Mosbro Sicklesmith 18/7/1824

1825 D Thomas Staniforth Mosbro 70 31/8/1825

1826 B Joseph STANIFORTH Elijah Naboth & Ann Mosbro Sicklesmith 6/8/1826 b7/7/1826

1832 B Thomas STANIFORTH Naboth & Ann Mosbro Sicklesmith 24/6/1832

1834 B Harriet STANIFORTH Elijah Naboth & Ann Mosbro Sicklesmith 16/3/1834

1835 B Elijah Naboth STANIFORTH Elijah Naboth Mosbro Sicklesmith 25/10/1835

1837 D Mary Staniforth Mosbro 65 13/12/1837

1838 D John Staniforth Mosbro 25 26/2/1838

-----

These notes bring up references to Elijah Naboth Staniforth having built both what was at one time called Mosbro' Moor Hall and another place called Mushroom Hall.

The roof window showing dates and names sounds like a wonderful historic feature of your house, Graham -- fantastic! Good luck to you with the house and garden restorations you mentioned, and thanks again for sharing such fascinating information. I'll do more checking and see what else I can find regarding the folks who once built and lived in your house, even as I continue to look for more about the Ridgeway Arms Pub buildings.

Cheers,

Lane

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Hello Lane

I enjoyed reading about your adventures in North East Derbyshire researching your Ancesters.

Here are a couple of newspaper cuttings from The Derby Mercury with references to Staniforths.

Regards

Southside

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Guest lanerellis

Hi Southside,

Thanks for your two fantastic newspaper items regarding Samuel Staniforth of Mosbro' Hall and Harriet Staniforth, the fifth daughter of Elijah Naboth Staniforth, sickle manufacturer of Mosbro' Moor Hall. The mystery deepens.

Cheers,

Lane

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Guest lanerellis

Hi Vox,

Thanks for the good link to the fascinating message thread with the Hounsfield information. I have a handful of Hounsfields among my relatives, from the Unstone, Dronfield area, and before that Darfield and Silkstone parishes in Yorkshire.

Cheers,
Lane

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Lane,

I recently have been reading a book called Gleanings of Beighton and local history by George Proudman book 2. In it there are loads of great pictures of my house and the surrounding area, but it also makes reference to possibly the other Hil house now a local pub Ridgeway) .

If mentions a Thomas Camm who lived at the Hall on Quary Hill in 1670 !!!! There was an area called Camm Bottom which now appears to be Owlthorpe and houses an estate. It states that Camm Bottom field belonged to Thomas Camm who owned Camm Farm off Quary Hill , High lane. It states he lived at the large house which was once known as Moor Hall. He was a large land owner in 1700s. Maybe the Hill on Mosborough moor was once this property, if so, it seriously predates my home.

It also appears that the old farm next to Moorhole lane was actually called Moor Hall farm and may have belonged to Thomas Camm.

Regards

Graham

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Lane,

Sorry looks like I am wasting your time with earlier note ... just seen an old map that shows the Ridgeway pub as part of an area called Mosborough Hill with the road quarry hill running alongside. Then a small road running off it towards the old quarry , past Rose cottage then onto Cam house. So maybe that is where Camm house is or was. Having only lived here for less then 3 years I hardly know any of the beaten track foot paths and small lanes , but am learning when not working on my house..

Regards

Graham

PS I am now trying to get part 1 of his book in case it holds more info.

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Hi Lane

My Great Grandfather Stephen Terry married Ann Ellis who was born in Spinkhill near Sheffield.

I will check my old records for further information.

Have you any record of a Ann Ellis born 1819?

It would be good to find we are related

PopT

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Guest lanerellis

A brief update:

Newspaper notice, Sheffield Independent, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, September 26, 1846, page 4:

TO BE LET,

AND may be Entered to on or about the 29th of September next, a desirable Country Residence, called MOSBRO' HILL, in the Parish of Eckington, (lately the Residence of Mr. John Staniforth, deceased,) with 23 Acres of excellent Grass LAND adjoining, in a high state of cultivation.

Mosbro' Hill is Five Miles from Sheffield, and adjoins the Turnpike Road leading from thence to Eckington, and is fit for the occupation of a large and respectable family. There is an unfailing supply of excellent Water, and a productive Garden and Orchard, well stocked with choice Fruit Trees. Also, capacious Outbuildings, convenient for the occupation of the Land. Further Particulars may be obtained on application to MR. JUBB, Drake House, near Beighton.

Newspaper notice, Sheffield Independent, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, March 31, 1849, page 4:

Sales by Mr. Robert Kay.

MOSBRO' HILL

ROBERT KAY has received instructions from Mr. George Curr, to SELL BY AUCTION, on the Farm Premises, at Mosbro' Hill, on THURSDAY, the 5th day of April, 1849, at Twelve o'Clock, the FARMING STOCK, BREWING and DAIRY UTENSILS, &c. Particulars in Posting Bills.

Intake, March 28th, 1849.

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Guest bestisblue

Apologies for my delay in responding to this thread.

I grew up at "The Hill" on Quarry Hill. The pictures here are exactly as I remembered it back then. Although I can't say the name Ellis rings a bell, sorry.

My earliest memories of the Hill are it being dilapidated, although the staircase was magnificent. We lived in the adjoining cottage. The House was later purchased by a local man and converted into the The Crofts.....named after us.

Unfortunately most of the House and it's Grounds were completely redesigned, which is such a shame as it then lost most of its charm. Originally directly infront of the double bay frontage were 2 tennis courts, behind which was a splendid orchard were I spent most of my childhood playing. The Paddock (now a car park) was simply wonderful, with a long winding drive leading to the imposing gate entrance at the bottom of Quarry Hill ( still there today - behind bus stop). It's worth noting that originally there was a pond also near the gate entrance - unfortunately this was filled in when the house was re-developed. However it wasn't actually a pond at all. Originally it was used for washing out the carriges and if I remember correctly the bottom of the so called pond was actually cobbled. The main house itself had  enourmous rooms with huge bay windows and very high ceilings. The cellar, that was how we used to get in..... Was cold and dark  and very scary for a seven year old! with MASSIVE stone slabs above which were huge rusty iron hooks where I assume game was hung. Also worth noting, which has not been mentioned before is that there was a tunnel which went underground down the side of the adjoining cottage and came out at the rear of the house. I rarely if ever went into it - partly because I was told it would be full of rats!!! But I understand it was used for the horse carriges. The other picture that shows the L shaped barns was infact the horse stables  to The Hill. It later became Sheffield City Council  Recreation Dept. I grew up with combine harvesters and tractors  constantly moving around outside my front door....fabulous memories. Today the L barns belong to my parents. They live in the main section at the back - the "wings" as I call them have also been completely converted into 2 seperate dwellings where my sister and my brother live with their families. 

 

I too tried for many years to find out more about "The Hill". The local libraries didn't have anything, I now realise that it's Chesterfield library as The Hill was originally classed as derbyshire.

image.jpg

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You may have more success tracking down his place of work, and whilst I am aware of the existence of a number of scythe manufactories that were established along the water courses in the adjoining valleys, most notably, the Moss and the Shirebrook, I can only ever remember seeing one such manufactory situate at Mosborough Moor. An hours’ searching has not yet yielded the map upon which I first saw it described, but I will post it, when I find it, [unless that is, someone beats me to it].

I think this map shows the location

It is the  OS 1:1 million – 1:10K, 1900s from http://maps.nls.uk/ 

 

 

Mosborough Moor.PNG

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