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Bar Code Information.....interesting!

ALWAYS READ THE LABELS ON THE FOODS YOU BUY--

NO MATTER WHAT THE FRONT OF THE BOX OR PACKAGE

SAYS, TURN IT OVER AND READ THE BACK---CAREFULLY!

With all the food and pet products now coming from China , it is best to

make sure you read label at the grocery store and especially Tesco / Asda when buying food products.

Many products no longer show where they were made, only give where the distributor is located.

It is important to read the bar code to track it's origin.

How to read Bar Codes .... Interesting!

This may be useful to know when grocery shopping, if it's a concern to you.

GREAT WAY TO "BUY BRITISH " AND NOT FROM CHINA

The whole world is concerned about China-made "black hearted goods".

Can you differentiate which one is made in Taiwan or China ?

If the first 3 digits of the barcode are 690 691 or 692, the product is MADE IN CHINA.

471 is Made in Taiwan .

This is our right to know, but the government and related departments never educate the public, therefore, we have to RESCUE ourselves.

Nowadays, Chinese businessmen know that consumers do not prefer products "MADE IN CHINA ", so they don't show from which country it is made.

However, you may now refer to the barcode - remember if the first 3 digits are:

690-692 ... Then it is MADE IN CHINA

00 - 09 ... USA & CANADA

30 - 37 FRANCE

40 - 44 GERMANY

471 .... Taiwan

49 ... JAPAN

50 ... UK

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And also beware of the Union Jack displayed on some goods.

Not necessarily made or produced in UK. Possibly only packaged or assembled.

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One worth watching if you buy sliced chicken products, or ready meals with chicken in them, is to look at the tiny print on the back to see where it's from. Sainsbury's own brand is often from South America, or Poland, or Thailand.

The real surprise was Bernard Matthews chicken. It might seem safe to assume it's British, but it's also from Poland and other countries, albeit 'raised to BM's standards.' At least their turkey is from Norfolk though.

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And also beware of the Union Jack displayed on some goods.

Not necessarily made or produced in UK. Possibly only packaged or assembled.

That's a tactic straight out of the "dirty tricks" book

Just like Japanese steel products being described as "Made in Sheffield", or blocks of so called "Cheddar" cheese being made just about anywhere in the World.

I suppose if they print the union jack upside down it's a bit of a give away that its not from the UK

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One worth watching if you buy sliced chicken products, or ready meals with chicken in them, is to look at the tiny print on the back to see where it's from. Sainsbury's own brand is often from South America, or Poland, or Thailand.

The real surprise was Bernard Matthews chicken. It might seem safe to assume it's British, but it's also from Poland and other countries, albeit 'raised to BM's standards.' At least their turkey is from Norfolk though.

Bootiful !!!

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Not quite accurate. Most cutlery, knives etc. manufactured prior to sometime around 1890 (not sure of the date) just had Sheffield without the 'England' stamped.

Best to read this link

http://www.snopes.com/politics/business/barcodes.asp

The only labelling fact that I know is that is you buy cutlery that says "Made in Sheffield" it needs to read "Made in Sheffield, England" to be truly from our city :)

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Not quite accurate. Most cutlery, knives etc. manufactured prior to sometime around 1890 (not sure of the date) just had Sheffield without the 'England' stamped.

Probably because before 1890 no one had "stolen" the name Sheffield and maliciously put it on inferior quality cutlery of their own.

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One early way some Sheffield cutlers tried to mark their wares was by etching on the blade, or printing under transparent scales, such legends as

"Sheffield made, both haft and blade; London for your life, show me such a knife".

or "Sharpen me well and keep me clean, and I'll cut my way through fat and lean".

or "I'm a Sheffield blade 'tis true; Pray what sort of blade are you?"

Or on one side of the haft "To carve your meat is my intent; Use me but let me not be lent" and on the other side, "I'll wait upon you at the table. And doe what service I am able."

(Leader, Sheffield in the 18th Century)

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One early way some Sheffield cutlers tried to mark their wares was by etching on the blade, or printing under transparent scales, such legends as

"Sheffield made, both haft and blade; London for your life, show me such a knife".

or "Sharpen me well and keep me clean, and I'll cut my way through fat and lean".

or "I'm a Sheffield blade 'tis true; Pray what sort of blade are you?"

Or on one side of the haft "To carve your meat is my intent; Use me but let me not be lent" and on the other side, "I'll wait upon you at the table. And doe what service I am able."

(Leader, Sheffield in the 18th Century)

Seems that Sheffield cutlers were also skilled poets as well then Bayleaf.

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Probably because before 1890 no one had "stolen" the name Sheffield and maliciously put it on inferior quality cutlery of their own.

Some Sheffielders were not so "whiter than white" it seems Dave. :o

Commercial enterprise and social progress, or, Gleanings in London, Sheffield, Glasgow and Dublin

James Dawson Burn - 1858

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Some Sheffielders were not so "whiter than white" it seems Dave. :o

attachicon.gifTrickery.jpg

Commercial enterprise and social progress, or, Gleanings in London, Sheffield, Glasgow and Dublin

James Dawson Burn - 1858

Sheffielders letting the side down!!! :o:angry:

That's treason, - they should hang for that!

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Some Sheffielders were not so "whiter than white" it seems Dave. :o

In 1847 John Shearer (!) of Eldon street had taken Walter Wilkinson into partnership. His idea was that he would then be able to stamp his shears as W.Wilkinson and pass them off as being made by William Wilkinson of Grimesthorpe, who had a good reputation. The plan fell down when two of Shearer's grinders refused to work on the blades stamped "W.Wilkinson". Shearer took them to court, where he won his case. The Mayor said that although the scheme was not honest, it was not up to employees to enforce the correct use of manufacturer's marks, and they must return to work. However by then the gaffe was blown and the scheme ceased.

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In 1847 John Shearer (!) of Eldon street had taken Walter Wilkinson into partnership. His idea was that he would then be able to stamp his shears as W.Wilkinson and pass them off as being made by William Wilkinson of Grimesthorpe, who had a good reputation. The plan fell down when two of Shearer's grinders refused to work on the blades stamped "W.Wilkinson". Shearer took them to court, where he won his case. The Mayor said that although the scheme was not honest, it was not up to employees to enforce the correct use of manufacturer's marks, and they must return to work. However by then the gaffe was blown and the scheme ceased.

To some it was "a cunning plan" to others it would be "a dirty underhand deceitful trick"

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