Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Yggdrasil

Whites 1838 Directory Map

Recommended Posts

I have enough ...

Great map, loving it. Thank you.

I don't know if this has been posted before, I've had a look but can't find it on the forum.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fk596rrddzw40cz/1838%20-%20Whites%20Directory.png

(I tried to attach the file but it hasn't appeared. Maybe I don't have the required number of posts?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, not had a proper look at it all yet, still working my way through it but up to now it's brilliant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prints very well at A0 size !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This map seems to suggest quite strongly there were ornamental gardens in the Leavygreave and Glossop Rd area - opposite where the Jessop Hospital was later built. I once read somewhere that there was such a garden in that area - anyone have any more info on that (such as a name for the gardens)? I've tried a bit of (metaphorical) digging, but not got anywhere.

They don't appear on the 1823 map, so I would guess they were planned out some time between then 1838, which at least narrows it down a bit...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great post - shows such wonderful old names as Port Mahon which I have always wondered about!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This map seems to suggest quite strongly there were ornamental gardens in the Leavygreave and Glossop Rd area - opposite where the Jessop Hospital was later built. I once read somewhere that there was such a garden in that area - anyone have any more info on that (such as a name for the gardens)? I've tried a bit of (metaphorical) digging, but not got anywhere.

They don't appear on the 1823 map, so I would guess they were planned out some time between then 1838, which at least narrows it down a bit...

In "Reminiscences of Old Sheffield" p.146 there is a reference to "Besides the celebrated gardens in the neighbourhood of Hanover Street..."

The 1853 map shows this block as having become market gardens / allotments.

Were the gardens associated with a long-gone large house at Leavy Greave? Where did the name Leavy Greave come from? - it is an old name - the 1569 Rate for the Makynge of Soulders listed "hughe hawke of Leveegreve."

Was the land belonging to John Stevenson (furniture dealer) who went bankrupt in 1837, the same area - see advertisement:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This map seems to suggest quite strongly there were ornamental gardens in the Leavygreave and Glossop Rd area - opposite where the Jessop Hospital was later built. I once read somewhere that there was such a garden in that area - anyone have any more info on that (such as a name for the gardens)? I've tried a bit of (metaphorical) digging, but not got anywhere.

They don't appear on the 1823 map, so I would guess they were planned out some time between then 1838, which at least narrows it down a bit...

Brook House, maybe .. ?

1853

==========================

Edit; think I'm in the wrong area .. :mellow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think these are the gardens that stimpson is meaning - there doesn't appear to be a large house with them:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leavy Greave = Leafy copse (Peter Harvey)

Where did the name Leavy Greave come from? - it is an old name - the 1569 Rate for the Makynge of Soulders listed "hughe hawke of Leveegreve."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think these are the gardens that stimpson is meaning - there doesn't appear to be a large house with them:

attachicon.gifLeavygreave Gardens.png

Thanks for the replies, that sheds a bit of light on things. Yes - that's the area (plus also the area the other side of Glossop Rd.) Indeed there doesn't seem to be any particular large house associated with those gardens, which is partly why there's not so much info about them, I might suppose. - but the 1837 article does seem relevant, certainly - "a most compact, salubrious and pleasant country residence" - sounds about right!

I hadn't actually seen that 1853 map before now - I had been looking on an 1849 map, which has much less detail...would someone be able to post the whole map here - or maybe just that area for comparison?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leavy Greave through the ages, courtesy of Sheffield Libraries:

1808

1822

1823

1832

1863

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×