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Sheffield Cholera Epidemic Of 1854

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Hi, can anyone help me please?

A lot has been said about the cholera epidemic of 1832 but not a lot about the epidemic of 1854. I discovered today

I have a relative who died in this epidemic and is buried in the General cemetery in an unmarked grave,public grave

It is a sad story she was only 26 and lived at a place called Sheaf island.

Does anyone know anything about Sheaf Island?

I would be very interested in any information on the epidemic and Sheaf Island

Thanks

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Hi, can anyone help me please?

A lot has been said about the cholera epidemic of 1832 but not a lot about the epidemic of 1854. I discovered today

I have a relative who died in this epidemic and is buried in the General cemetery in an unmarked grave,public grave

It is a sad story she was only 26 and lived at a place called Sheaf island.

Does anyone know anything about Sheaf Island?

I would be very interested in any information on the epidemic and Sheaf Island

Thanks

The 1854 cholera outbeak must have been the last one to affect Sheffield as it was in that year in London that there was an outbreak of the disease that was confined to a very small area (Broad Street) which drew water from a communal well, and the work of John Snow proved that the disease was transmitted through contaminated water. It was not long after that the microbe responsible was identified and the treatment of drinking water by sterilisation and chlorination become standard practice on the grounds of public health. In Britain at least, cholera was eradicated. However, says he pre-empting red nose day by a week, in some countries, especially poor African countries, it remains a serious, potentially fatal disease to this day.

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Thanks for that info Dave,there are just no statistics for this year even though it was an outbreak

The staff at the General cemetery were great I must add when they found out the cause of death and showed us the plot where our relative was buried.

I cant find any information or photos on Sheaf Island though,it was near the bottom of Ecclessal road,does anyone know anything about this

Help appreciated

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Thanks for that info Dave,there are just no statistics for this year even though it was an outbreak

The staff at the General cemetery were great I must add when they found out the cause of death and showed us the plot where our relative was buried.

I cant find any information or photos on Sheaf Island though,it was near the bottom of Ecclessal road,does anyone know anything about this

Help appreciated

Sheaf Island was the area of land between Pond Hill (Dyer's Hill) and Harmer Lane,

created by the River Sheaf (now culverted) to the east, and a mill goit on the west side,

that flowed from the Bedford Dam (south) to Ponds Dam (north).

1853.

Link to Flash Earth

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The first case of cholera that occurred in Sheffield, in September last year, was in Brown Street, situate in a low part of the town, in the vicinity of a large open sewer. It was in this same locality that the epidemic raged with the greatest violence in its previous visitations.

(The two white circles make sense).

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/lords/1854/mar/09/sanitary-measures

http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic/13870-brown-street/

Thanks Steve.

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A Newspaper account October 7th says there had been 173 deaths. Outside Sheffield the village of Wickersley was badly hit. Probably the reason for flare ups were British troops bringing it back. It was particularily bad in Ireland.

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Thanks for the info,have you got a copy of the newspaper article?

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Where would I find it then please?

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Thanks for that,I really appreciate your help

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MIASMA

Near a cotter's back door, in a murky lane,

Beneath steaming dirt and stagnant rain,

Miasma lay in a festering drain.

A home of clay, cemented with slime.

He artfully built— for he hated lime—

'Midst slop, and rot, and want, and crime.

He lay securely, biding his time.

Though a voice cried, pointing out his lair,

" Run, run, for Miasma lies hidden there !"

It died unheeded away on the air.

Living and breathing the filth among,

Miasma's home was secure and strong,

And the cotter did nothing ; for nothing went

wrong.

And his children would play by the poisonous pool,

For they liked it much better than going to school.

Then Miasma arose from his reeking bed,

And around the children his mantle spread —

" To save them from harm," Miasma said.

But they sighed a last sigh. He had stolen their breath.

And had wrapped them in Cholera's cloak of death.

---

Charles Dickens

Household Words

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Presumably the people and firms living and operating on Sheaf Island had to be compensated when the Midland Station was built, just like now with the HS2 creation. So there must have been records of this. It would answer lots of questions for anyone interested in anybody operating or living on Sheaf Island.

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