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Photo Gps Extract


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I found this little gem of a program that works like a dream. Most mobile phones save gps date when a picture as been taken on it. You can load your pictures from your phone into it & it will show all the GPS data. Then if you click on a photo it will open a google map & show you its location it was taken at.

Photo GPS Extract (PGE) is a small utility to see the coordinates of a JPG image on a Google map.

click on Link below.enjoy.

http://www.bvsystems.be/photoGPSextract.php

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What i have found when uploading photos with GPS data to this website. Is that its stripping this data out of them.

Is this normal. Why i am asking is that i have been exploring westwood & thorncliffe today & found lots of interesting things. (old air shafts/building ruins/westwood train station ruins/railway sleepers from the westwood line/ bridge houses ruins & more. My photos have GPS data. & i think it would be good to have a topic on photos people have taken with there location data intact.

These could be photos of interesting things or of walks around woods & paths. It makes things easier & more interesting when you can look at a photo & then see its location on a map.

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muddycoffee

I believe that when digital photos are taken they are produced in a raw format which results in quite a large file. This raw file has lots of extra data embedded in it like time, date, gps, camera name, lens settings etc, although not all cameras fill out every entry.

Usually most users then edit the photo with a "Paintshop/Photoshop/Picture manager" type program to crop and resize the image. When saved, this will result in a much smaller file as it strips out the extra data.

A chap I used to know who works with forensics told me that digital photographic evidence in a court case was only accepted as safe if it was in raw form. Because if it doesn't have all the original data intact in the file then it could easily have been altered on photoshop.

Now on to the issue of publishing photos on websites and web forums. It is always a good idea to optimise photos so they do not put too much overhead on the internet connection at the user's end. To do this I will always resize and resave the file as a jpeg format which is usually just a few kbyes. When the origonal raw file can be 4 or 8 megabits with all the raw data.

If you had a page with lots of 4 or 8Mb pictures, it would take a long time to render on all but the fastest of broadband connections. And may cause some user's browsers to crash or become none responsive for a time.

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Stuart0742
I believe that when digital photos are taken they are produced in a raw format which results in quite a large file. This raw file has lots of extra data embedded in it like time, date, gps, camera name, lens settings etc, although not all cameras fill out every entry.

Usually most users then edit the photo with a "Paintshop/Photoshop/Picture manager" type program to crop and resize the image. When saved, this will result in a much smaller file as it strips out the extra data.

A chap I used to know who works with forensics told me that digital photographic evidence in a court case was only accepted as safe if it was in raw form. Because if it doesn't have all the original data intact in the file then it could easily have been altered on photoshop.

Now on to the issue of publishing photos on websites and web forums. It is always a good idea to optimise photos so they do not put too much overhead on the internet connection at the user's end. To do this I will always resize and resave the file as a jpeg format which is usually just a few kbyes. When the origonal raw file can be 4 or 8 megabits with all the raw data.

If you had a page with lots of 4 or 8Mb pictures, it would take a long time to render on all but the fastest of broadband connections. And may cause some user's browsers to crash or become none responsive for a time.

At the point of "Exposure" yes an image is in Raw format, but for ease of storage it is then compressed into a storable format, usually JPEG or TIFF.

However some high end cameras can save images in RAW, but these are a much larger file size.

A RAW file is the equivalent of a digital negative and can not be altered, any alterations you make are saved as an XML attachement, If you save the RAW image as say a JPEG copy the EXIF data then becomes editable, as Steve has demonstrated that above.

Whatever you do you will still have your original, unless you delete it of course.

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