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RichardB

Not Immediately Obvious ...

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RichardB

What this has to do with Sheffield ?

£60-ish.

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Bayleaf

Horatio Hornblower? :rolleyes:

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syrup

12 Fitzwilliam Street ??

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DaveH

What this has to do with Sheffield ?

£60-ish.

The person selling it has priced it in $ and not in £, indicating that they are American.

Do Americans, in general, actually know anything about Sheffield?

NO!

So it probably has nothing to do with Sheffield.

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DaveH

Now, the coin is dated 1812, by which time Nelson had been dead for 7 years (Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805) and the legend on the coin "England expects that every man will do his duty" dates from that time.

Is this just a commenorative halfpenny coin?

If so was it "minted" in Sheffield?

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dunsbyowl1867

Nelson's chaplain on the Victory was Alfred Gatty's father in law and is buried in Ecclesfield churchyard - there that is a connection!!

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dunsbyowl1867

Here is another - in much better condition - states Sheffield as well. Asuume as Dave says where it was minted.

http://www.abccoinsandtokens.com/W.1590.009.html

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RichardB

What a perculiar bit of knowledge !

Nelson's chaplain on the Victory was Alfred Gatty's father in law and is buried in Ecclesfield churchyard - there that is a connection!!

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RichardB

I'm sure Sheffield men served but Sheffield and a Naval halfpenny don't sit well together ... to me.

Here is another - in much better condition - states Sheffield as well. Asuume as Dave says where it was minted.

http://www.abccoinsa...W.1590.009.html

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syrup

Nelson's chaplain on the Victory was Alfred Gatty's father in law and is buried in Ecclesfield churchyard - there that is a connection!!

http://elizabethashw...horatio-nelson/

Alexander Scott brought up his two daughters alone and campaigned for better education and schools for both boys and girls.

In 1816 he received the living at Catterick, although he arrived to find the vicarage in a dilapidated state and the bills unpaid.

Here he spent much of his time reading and researching.

His health was never good and he died at Ecclesfield, in south Yorkshire, during the night of the 24th July 1840 at the age of 72 when he became ill whilst visiting his daughter Margaret, who was the wife of the Revd Alfred Gatty, vicar of St Mary’s church.

He is buried in the churchyard. The tomb can be found if you follow the path around the back of the church.

It is to the left of the path just before the gateway to the vicarage and bears the following inscription:

‘Waiting for the adoption – the redemption of our body’ Here lies buried, Alexander John Scott DD,

vicar of Catterick and Southminster and Chaplain to Admiral Lord Nelson on board HMS Victory at Trafalgar.

He died July 24 1840 aged 72.

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dunsbyowl1867

A photo of his tomb on this thread

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Markbaby

I think some of the answer lies in the text of the page found here:

http://www.thecoppercorner.com/history/18thC_hist.html

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