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mick851

Ww1 Mystery

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mick851

I've found the details of Percy Bamforth when he was in ww1, it says he volunteered to join the Royal Artillery at Sheffield on the 10th August 1915, He served with the guns at the front for seven months. He was immediately " attached for duty at Elliot & Sons Sheffield". On the 28th January 1916, Percy was posted as being " supernumerary" by the Sheffield Administrative centre, so remained at Elliot's. Percy was "released" from Elliotts on the 26th August 1916 and sent for trade testing at Leeds. He failed his trade tests and on the 29th August 1916 he was posted to the 1st Reserve Brigade RFA.

He returned to france and was discharged from the army on 20th march 1919.

How can you be serving on the front line, then have to go back home to work in a cutlery manufacturers, what was Elliot & sons doing in ww1 has it says it was unclear what their role was in wartime?

:huh:

mick

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lysander

During WW2 an old friend of mine was serving with the Desert Air Force. He had joined the RAF in 1938 to get out of coal mining. So many young miners had joined the forces and so bad had become coal output that he and other ex miners were asked to volunteer to go back home and go down the pit again. My friend reckoned fighting Rommel was better than mining!

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dunsbyowl1867

My Grandfather's brother from Shiregreen joined up during WW1 - he enlisted in the DofW West Yorks. Luckily he never made it to France and was "transferred" to work at Armstrong Whitworths in Newcastle upon Tyne. His papers are on ancestry - it includes a letter from the War office informing him that the cabinet had decided to release certain soldiers who worked in the "Admitalty Trades" to engage in important war work. His occupation was a Turner.

Another relative wasn't so lucky he joined the Navy but there was a surplus of men so his lot was deployed on the Western Front where he kopped it!

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tozzin

I would say the Elliots switched their production to War work as did VINERS & GREAVES.

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SteveHB

I would say the Elliots switched their production to War work as did VINERS & GREAVES.

As did Pinders, in WW 2.

"Opened in 1939, the premises covered offices, warehouse, packing and dispatch departments, showroom, silversmiths' workshops, electro-plating department etc. The opening, however, virtually coincided with World War Two. Staff were called up, and the factory continued on the basis of Government contracts; cutlery for the Forces, and copper bands for shells. Later, high speed steel tools, and parts for Bailey Bridges were added"

http://www.pinder.co.uk/history

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