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City Road Cemetery


Guest keslouha2012

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Guest keslouha2012

can anyone please tell if there is anyone else buried with wilfred slinn 1889-1944 buried in section f no.4175. i know there is a sam sayles there but i need to know if anyone else is buried there and their dates if possible, i would go myself but i moved away from the city years ago and i dont have the time now.

if anyone can give me more information i would appreciate it thankyou.

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Visit the Sheffield Indexers website they have the records of those burried in City Road. You can click to find all those burried in the same place as Wilfred.

http://www.sheffield...urialIndex.html

Just type his name in there!

Hi History Dude - this may have already been covered somewhere else on the site, so forgive me, but what about crematorium records - where are they kept?

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Hi History Dude - this may have already been covered somewhere else on the site, so forgive me, but what about crematorium records - where are they kept?

In many cemetries with a crematorium, - certainly Abbey Lane / Hutcliffe Wood but not so sure about City Road, as well as having a garden of rememberance where cremated ashes can be scattered they have places like a wall or kerbstones where small brass plates bearing memorial inscriptions can be fixed (a bit like having a headstone on a grave).

Due to space restrictions places for these brass plates is "hired out / rented" usually for 30 years or so, by which time most direct relatives who would the cemetry or also likely to have passed on.

If the brass plates are removed when the rental term expires what happens to them?

...and more importantly what happens to the family history information that they must contain?

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History dude

Hi History Dude - this may have already been covered somewhere else on the site, so forgive me, but what about crematorium records - where are they kept?

This might help!

https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/libraries/archives-and-local-studies/collections/cemetery-registers.html

Also read this...

https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/caresupport/bereavement/burialrecords.html

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ukelele lady

In many cemetries with a crematorium, - certainly Abbey Lane / Hutcliffe Wood but not so sure about City Road, as well as having a garden of rememberance where cremated ashes can be scattered they have places like a wall or kerbstones where small brass plates bearing memorial inscriptions can be fixed (a bit like having a headstone on a grave).

Due to space restrictions places for these brass plates is "hired out / rented" usually for 30 years or so, by which time most direct relatives who would the cemetry or also likely to have passed on.

If the brass plates are removed when the rental term expires what happens to them?

...and more importantly what happens to the family history information that they must contain?

The plaques are usually made of bronze or used to be and rented out for 25 years unless things have changed.

When the 25 years are up they will inform you and ask if you want to rent for an extended period.

I didn't do this for my mothers because I doubted if I would still be around in 25 years so they

posted it on to me which I thought was nice of them , I didn't have to go and collect it.

A few years ago some scrap thief was stealing them at Hutcliffe Wood Road Cemetery but I think was

they were later discovered dumped somewhere.

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The plaques are usually made of bronze or used to be and rented out for 25 years unless things have changed.

When the 25 years are up they will inform you and ask if you want to rent for an extended period.

I didn't do this for my mothers because I doubted if I would still be around in 25 years so they

posted it on to me which I thought was nice of them , I didn't have to go and collect it.

A few years ago some scrap thief was stealing them at Hutcliffe Wood Road Cemetery but I think was

they were later discovered dumped somewhere.

I think I'll have my little brass epitaph engraved now, -

DaveH

Remembered ALWAYS

NEVER forgotten

Well, not for 25 years

Then we will forget he ever existed.

Something seems a bit wrong about that to me <_<

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History dude

Or as my Grandmother used to say... On his gravestone plainly written where these words! Well and truly knackered....

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Or as my Grandmother used to say... On his gravestone plainly written where these words! Well and truly knackered....

Or the lifelong hypocondriac who had the inscription

I told you there was something wrong with me

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You do know those that live around City Road Cem can't be burried in it!

Rules me out then

Why not?

Funeral services, be it burial or cremation, both carried out at City Road, are expensive and seeing as the whole world is out to make a quick easy profit these days I would have thought that if you were paying to be buried there they wouldn't be too bothered about where you had previously lived.

Reading the inscription in City Road, many interments do seem to be people who had lived locally.

Further to this City Road must be one of the few cemetries with spare capacity for burials now that the back of it is opened out onto Manor Fields.

The front of the cemetry is a different matter, at one time they didn't like interments close to the road (City Road) where they would be visible from the street, but now the interments go all the way up to the cemetry wall and railings with little, if any, spare capacity.

Never mind, I can always go to Abbey Lane or Hutcliffe Woods.

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Because they are not dead yet lol:P

There are some people, actually a lot of people, who live near City Road cemetry, that are currently still alive that don't want to be buried there.

They don't want to be buried anywhere, they would much rather just carry on living (sounds like the title of a comedy film!).

Unfortunately the nature of life itself dictates otherwise.

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Thank History Dude and Dave H thanks for the background to the brass plates regarding the 25 years - never knew that.

You don't get anything unless you pay for it, - and continue to pay for it indefinately. So I suppose if your dead and the time comes when all your direct relatives are too that can actually remember you (say 2 generations) then the money dries up and your eternal memorial just gets removed and forgotten about.

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History dude

Gravestones and the like are becoming increasingly unlikely to be a permanant memorial to anybody. With vandalism and the weather doing the best to destroy them. However even those set up to maintain them are pressed by money concerns or issues such as keeping them tidy. Closed burial grounds of long dead people have no-one intrested in protecting them and the public (due to the connection with death) don't want to provide charitable funds to keep gravestones in good nick. As we have seen with many graveyards in inner city areas, these can be re-used as public parks for ball games etc. But the stones have been removed for this to happen. In St John's Park, the stones have been used as paving slabs. Some cutt up and used to make steps!

Because graves of ordinary people are not seen as heritage or important to the nation many destructive acts have taken place, some very recent. I personal feel that the persons in the City Council who authorised the clearance of areas in Burngreave and the General cemetery are just as bigger vandals as those youths that are reported in the Star vandalising City Road etc.

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Gravestones and the like are becoming increasingly unlikely to be a permanant memorial to anybody. With vandalism and the weather doing the best to destroy them. However even those set up to maintain them are pressed by money concerns or issues such as keeping them tidy. Closed burial grounds of long dead people have no-one intrested in protecting them and the public (due to the connection with death) don't want to provide charitable funds to keep gravestones in good nick. As we have seen with many graveyards in inner city areas, these can be re-used as public parks for ball games etc. But the stones have been removed for this to happen. In St John's Park, the stones have been used as paving slabs. Some cutt up and used to make steps!

Because graves of ordinary people are not seen as heritage or important to the nation many destructive acts have taken place, some very recent. I personal feel that the persons in the City Council who authorised the clearance of areas in Burngreave and the General cemetery are just as bigger vandals as those youths that are reported in the Star vandalising City Road etc.

HERE HERE - I completely agree - its disgusting.

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From Sheffield Indexers Burial Records

SAYLES, Kate (No occupation, age 80).
     Died at Nether Edge Hospital; Buried on January 25, 1973 in Unconsecrated ground; 
     Grave Number 4175, Section F of City Road Cemetery, Sheffield.
     Parent or Next of Kin if Available: ~. Remarks: ~.
     Plot Owner: ~ ~ of ~. Page No 93 
     Find Similar in Same Grave             Same Household if Available            Surname Match if Available

 

SAYLES, Sam (Silver Finisher, age 51).
     Died at 60 Prospect Rd; Buried on December 21, 1944 in General Portion ground; 
     Grave Number 4175, Section F of City Road Cemetery, Sheffield.
     Parent or Next of Kin if Available: ~. Remarks: ~.
     Plot Owner: ~ ~ of ~. Page No 130 
     Find Similar in Same Grave             Same Household if Available            Surname Match if Available

 

SLINN, Lily (Household duties, age 82).
     Died at Royal Infirmary; Buried on November 28, 1978 in Unconsecrated ground; 
     Grave Number 4175, Section F of City Road Cemetery, Sheffield.
     Parent or Next of Kin if Available: ~. Remarks: ~.
     Plot Owner: ~ ~ of ~. Page No 288 
     Find Similar in Same Grave             Same Household if Available            Surname Match if Available

 

SLINN, Wilfred (Saw Maker, age 49).
     Died at Royal Hospital; Buried on September 14, 1938 in General Portion ground; 
     Grave Number 4175, Section F of City Road Cemetery, Sheffield.
     Parent or Next of Kin if Available: ~. Remarks: .
     Plot Owner: ~ ~ of ~. Page No 93 
     Find Similar in Same Grave             Same Household if Available            Surname Match if Available

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