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RichardB
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I've had a diabetic sight test today, my eyes are still a little bit "away with the mixer" so apologies in advance if I've made any spelling mistakes.

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You're not alone Richard. I'm still having occasional laser treatment for my 'good' eye, and spend half my time with a dilated pupil, blinking at the light!

One thing I learned at my last visit - even if it's pouring with rain when you get to the hospital, always take your sunglasses. If not, you can guarantee it'll be bright sunshine when you come out! B)

Hope all goes well for you.

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I was fine with distance vision within 10 minutes, without sunglasses - just couldn't read properly for several hours.

You're not alone Richard. I'm still having occasional laser treatment for my 'good' eye, and spend half my time with a dilated pupil, blinking at the light!

One thing I learned at my last visit - even if it's pouring with rain when you get to the hospital, always take your sunglasses. If not, you can guarantee it'll be bright sunshine when you come out! B)

Hope all goes well for you.

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I was fine with distance vision within 10 minutes, without sunglasses - just couldn't read properly for several hours.

They say your vision will be affected for up to 6 hours and during that time you should not drive or operate machinery or do anything else where impaired vision would put you or anyone else in a dangerous situation.

I have to have it done once a year, again as a diabetic retinopathy screening. It isn't pleasant but its probably worth it rather than risk going blind.

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Right, I've been opticianed. New glasses on order, varifocal fellas, never needed reading glasses thus far - it's just an age thing I guess.

Would you like to browse the frames on offer ?

No Thanks, I'll have another pair exactly the same as the ones I'm wearing with different lenses please.

The easiest consultation ever ... probably ...

Given up and made an appointment with the normal optician. Finding reading much tougher than it should be.

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First pair of glasses were September 1977 from the bottom of Dykes Hall Road (near the bus stop), cost £277 - a heck of a lot of money back then.

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Good luck with the varifocals Richard, they take a bit of getting used to. When my missus first had hers she almost gave up, but having persevered she wouldn't swap them for swapping between distance and readers.

Most of us finish up needing reading glasses. In my case it showed up when I could only read an OS map by hitching my glasses onto my forehead and putting the map close to my nose.

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It's been getting me down,when I'm already as down as you can get. Hopefully I'll get used to 'em.

Good luck with the varifocals Richard, they take a bit of getting used to. When my missus first had hers she almost gave up, but having persevered she wouldn't swap them for swapping between distance and readers.

Most of us finish up needing reading glasses. In my case it showed up when I could only read an OS map by hitching my glasses onto my forehead and putting the map close to my nose.

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First pair of glasses were September 1977 from the bottom of Dykes Hall Road (near the bus stop), cost £277 - a heck of a lot of money back then.

My first pair of glasses, (John Lennon style) were from Miss Greaves in around 1957, Her shop was next to Howards Dairy on Middlewood Road. You may remember she had a large octagonal oak cased barometer in the window.

Since I had my cataracts done I got the optician to make me a pair of varifocals with virtually no correction at the top tapering to my reading prescription at the bottom.

I can watch the telly by looking through the middle part of the lenses, look through the bottom part for reading or computer work, and I don't have to take them off to walk around the house because everything more than 3 metres away is in focus by looking through the top un-corrected part.

I drive without wearing any glasses because I find they limit my peripheral vision and I can read number plates at twice the official distance without glasses.

Varifocals take a bit of getting used to especially if you have neck problems and are not used to shifting your head from it's comfotable position.

Well worth perservering though.

HD

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For reasons which may be obvious I feel I've aged 20 years in the last three months. So, I've no choice but to give 'em a go, can't go on like I am at the moment with a magnified screen.

Varifocals take a bit of getting used to especially if you have neck problems and are not used to shifting your head from it's comfotable position.

Well worth perservering though.

HD

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Like HD and Bayleaf say Varifocals take a bit of getting used to, when the optician says perservere, then do so they are are good when you get used to them

I have worn them for about 8 years, but to be honest I could not get used tg the basic varifocal lens, its all down to finding a lens that suits what you do.

I believe most opticians will change or refund if you have big problems, I find SpecSavers very good

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I use the optician in my local Tesco, they offer basic, standard, elite and made for you - I opted for Elite, for £100 extra since my brain was mashed and I couldn't work out what made for you offered extra. I'll let you know how I get on when I get my new glasses.

Like HD and Bayleaf say Varifocals take a bit of getting used to, when the optician says perservere, then do so they are are good when you get used to them

I have worn them for about 8 years, but to be honest I could not get used tg the basic varifocal lens, its all down to finding a lens that suits what you do.

I believe most opticians will change or refund if you have big problems, I find SpecSavers very good

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Like HD and Bayleaf say Varifocals take a bit of getting used to, when the optician says perservere, then do so they are are good when you get used to them

I have worn them for about 8 years, but to be honest I could not get used tg the basic varifocal lens, its all down to finding a lens that suits what you do.

I believe most opticians will change or refund if you have big problems, I find SpecSavers very good

Is that because Mrs0742 gets a staff discount? lol

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I use the optician in my local Tesco, they offer basic, standard, elite and made for you - I opted for Elite, for £100 extra since my brain was mashed and I couldn't work out what made for you offered extra. I'll let you know how I get on when I get my new glasses.

Good choice

Yes Dave it does help

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Like HD and Bayleaf say Varifocals take a bit of getting used to, when the optician says perservere, then do so they are are good when you get used to them

I have worn them for about 8 years, but to be honest I could not get used tg the basic varifocal lens, its all down to finding a lens that suits what you do.

I believe most opticians will change or refund if you have big problems, I find SpecSavers very good

My experiance with varifocals has been that some labs are better at grinding the lenses than others.

My first pair only gave good results in one vertical plane as it were. I had to move my head from side to side when reading wide material otherwise the words went out of focus if I wasn't looking through the centre line of the lens. My present glasses are much better but the effect is still noticeable with my wide screen laptop.

Still it's got to be better than my pre-implant days when my lenses were about 10 mm thick at the outer edges even with madly expensive high refraction lenses..

The powers-that-be at British Steel decreed that spectacle wearers had to have prescription safety glasses.

They had to be a certain thickness at the middle of the lens to withstand a "ball bearing dropped from a great height" test and were made with low refraction polycarbonate lenses.

When my glasses arrived they had to be seen to be believed. They were about 25 mm thick at the edges and stuck out from the frames in a ridiculous manner. When I put them on I had extreme tunnel vision and if I looked down at my feet they appeared to be about ten feet away. I had one attempt at walking across the Billet Mill floor with it's various steel floor plates at different levels and fell about five times.

After that I only wore them at Christmas parties for comedy effect. :)

HD

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They had to be a certain thickness at the middle of the lens to withstand a "ball bearing dropped from a great height" test and were made with low refraction polycarbonate lenses.

These tests are often quite meaningless and the claims often made on safety glasses / goggles are often ridiculous.

I once had a pair of high impact safety glasses which claimed _

"capable of withstanding the impact of a quarter inch diameter steel ball bearing travelling at 400 metres per second"

Now, this would be very easy to test as the claim is very specific

However, the stated impact and the momentum involved is that of a bullet from a high velocity rifle

Even if the lens did survive the impact of the ball bearing the force involved would probably break your neck if it didn't take your head off!

In the event the lenses did eventually crack completely in half after I had carried them around in my trousers back pocket and sat down with them there a time or two so they were probably not that safe after all.

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In the event the lenses did eventually crack completely in half after I had carried them around in my trousers back pocket and sat down with them there a time or two so they were probably not that safe after all.

Was your backside travelling at 400 metres per second at the time or did it have a mass greater than that of a quarter inch diameter steel ball ?

:rolleyes: :rolleyes:

HD

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Was your backside travelling at 400 metres per second at the time or did it have a mass greater than that of a quarter inch diameter steel ball ?

:rolleyes: :rolleyes:

HD

When teaching the physical properties of materials students often find it difficult that hardness is associated with brittleness.

Glass is hard, - but also brittle.

Steel is not particularly hard but it is strong, - hard and strong do not mean the same thing.

Strength can be tensile, compressional, shear or of several other variations which means that the exact definitions of what hard and strong (and other similar related words) mean in science has to be quite precise.

However, the material used in these safety glasses could, allegedly from the manufacturers claim, withstand a sudden hard impact which exerts a large force on a small area, but could not it seems withstand a regularly applied smaller force over a larger area (not that I have a large backside).

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Speaking of materials, and totally off-the-original-topic, I came across something about this stuff the other day. Sounds remarkable (if true?)

I can remember seeing the original demonstration of it on "Tommorow's World" with Raymond Baxter and Judith Hahn in the 1970's

They blasted a blokes hand directly with blowtorch while he was wearing a "glove" made of it. His hand didn't even feel warm.

At the time it was claimed NASA was interested in it as a non-ablative heat shield to withstand the high temperatures spacecraft are subjected to on re-entry into the Earths atmosphere.

However, the Wikipedia linked article does indicate little commercialisation and does cast doubt on the actual existance of the material.

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Interesting. .. strange. ..

Like HD and Bayleaf say Varifocals take a bit of getting used to, when the optician says perservere, then do so they are are good when you get used to them

I have worn them for about 8 years, but to be honest I could not get used tg the basic varifocal lens, its all down to finding a lens that suits what you do.

I believe most opticians will change or refund if you have big problems, I find SpecSavers very good

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