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Gleadless Ww1 Grave

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This stone at Gleadless Christ Church has Frank Haigh of the Coldstream Guards on it, died August 5 1916. Presumably he wasn't intered there? It says "He gave his life for his friends".

Anyone know more about him?

Also his sister Emma is "killed" on September 1st 1915. Was she a nurse, or something else, again on the front?

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It's only recently that British War Dead have been repatriated for burial. In WW1 they certainly were buried near where they fell, witness the huge war cemeteries. But Sheffield graveyards have numerous family graves where the fallen are added to the inscription, even though they are buried in far away fields. Sometimes it's a simple line as in this case, often it will say something like "Killed in action, France, July 1st 1916".

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Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914-1919 Name: Frank HAIGH Rank: PRIVATE Initials: F Birthplace: Masboro, Yorks Residence: Gleadless, Nr. Sheffield Enlisted: Sheffield Regiment, Corps etc.: Coldstream Guards Battalion etc.: 1st Battalion. 4.8.14 Aldershot: 1st (Guards) Bde. 1st Div. Aug. 1914 to France. 25.8.15 to 2nd Guards Bde. Guards Div. 11.11.18 2nd Guards Bde. Guards Div. France; near Maubeuge. 2nd Battalion. 4.8.14 Windsor: 4th (Guards) Bde. 2nd Div. 13.8.14 landed at Havre. 20.8.15 to 1st Guards Bde. Guards Div. 11.11.18 1st Guards Bde. Guards Div. France; N.E. of Maubeuge. 3rd Battalion. 4.8.14 Chelsea Barracks: 4th (Guards) Bde. 2nd Div. 13.8.14 landed at Havre. 20.8.15 to 1st Guards Bde. Guards Div. 8.2.18 to 4th Guards Bde. 31st Div. 20.5.18 4th Guards Bde. to G.H.Q.Reserve. 11.11.18 4th Guards Bde. France; Criel Plage, S.W. of Le Treport. 4th Battalion. (Pioneers). Formed at Windsor on 17.7.15 as Guards Pioneer Bn. but soon became 4th Bn. 15.8.15 to France and joined Guards Div. 11.11.18 Pioneer Bn. Guards Div. France; near Maubeuge. 5th (Reserve) Battalion. Formed at Windsor in Aug. 1914 as 4th (Reserve) Bn. and in July 1915 became 5th (Reserve) Bn. Stationed at Windsor throughout the war. Provided drafts of 16860 all ranks. 1st Provisional Battalion was formed at Aldershot on 7.8.18 for duty at the Senior Officers School. Number: 14294 Date died: 5 August 1916 How died: Killed in action Theatre of war: France & Flanders

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Emma Haigh's death is listed in the Ecclesall Bierlow records at ancestry, which suggests she died there. Perhaps an accident?

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The man himself.

Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps.

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and our entry on Sheffieldsoldier

http://www.sheffieldsoldierww1.co.uk/search4.php?id=219786

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This is quite amazing! All that information, from 5 different sources, 3 different countries, all in one day and SO accurate!

Could it get any better?

Here's me thinking SH is like a slumbering giant, a bit lethargic at times, inactive, disinterested. How wrong I was.

Now I liken it to a well oiled machine, gently humming in the background, ready to spring into action at the click of a mouse.

Should I get me coat?

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This is quite amazing! All that information, from 5 different sources, 3 different countries, all in one day and SO accurate!

Could it get any better?

Here's me thinking SH is like a slumbering giant, a bit lethargic at times, inactive, disinterested. How wrong I was.

Now I liken it to a well oiled machine, gently humming in the background, ready to spring into action at the click of a mouse.

Should I get me coat?

See this?That's us that is.

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Ouch! Bayleaf. You have just incurred the wrath of a fellow administrator.

Quote: Thanks history dude for yet another of adjectives to describe what I think of Shakespeare's work,

Gibberish, Rubbish and, oh yes, OBSOLETE!

No doubt you'll be hearing from him soon.

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Emma Haigh's death is listed in the Ecclesall Bierlow records at ancestry, which suggests she died there. Perhaps an accident?

As you can see from the gravestone it was no accident. If it wasn't a result of war, say an air raid, then it must mean she was murdered, or something which implies it could have been prevented.

No newspaper reports of her death anywhere?

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At the 1911 census the Haigh family were living at 19 Gladstone Road, Gleadless. Frank was a Coal Miner (Filler Underground - aged 18 ) and Emma was an Elementary School Teacher for the West Riding County Council (aged 21).

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This is quite amazing! All that information, from 5 different sources, 3 different countries, all in one day and SO accurate!

Could it get any better?

Here's me thinking SH is like a slumbering giant, a bit lethargic at times, inactive, disinterested. How wrong I was.

Now I liken it to a well oiled machine, gently humming in the background, ready to spring into action at the click of a mouse.

Should I get me coat?

Ah have you fallen for Trefcons bio information, he lives in Sheffield, however to make up for that I am/was in Switzerland when I made my post lol

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Ouch! Bayleaf. You have just incurred the wrath of a fellow administrator.

Quote: Thanks history dude for yet another of adjectives to describe what I think of Shakespeare's work,

Gibberish, Rubbish and, oh yes, OBSOLETE!

No doubt you'll be hearing from him soon.

Bayleaf has left the building, sharpish! He may be gone some time...

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As you can see from the gravestone it was no accident. If it wasn't a result of war, say an air raid, then it must mean she was murdered, or something which implies it could have been prevented.

No newspaper reports of her death anywhere?

I already checked for air raids yesterday. The first organized Gotha raids on England took place at the start of Unternehmung Türkenkreuz (Operation Turkish Cross), in May 1917, and that's a year and a half after Emma Haigh died. I'm almost certain the Gotha G.I (which was the only long-range German bomber in service at that time) had nowhere near the range to reach Sheffield (unfortunately webpages for the Gotha G.I list speed, weight and various other details, but not range) - from what I recall, I believe it was used for long-range reconnaissance and only rarely as a tactical bomber. Even the Gotha G.V had only a range of 522 miles, which is too short to get to Sheffield and back, from the closest Gotha base to Sheffield. Anyway, in September 1915, there were only at most 5 Gotha G.I aircraft in the entire German Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches ("Imperial German Flying Corps"). Kagohl 1 (Kampfgeschwader der Obersten Heeresleitung - fighter squadron supreme military command - we'd call it 'strategic bombing command') was not even organized until December 1915, so there's basically no chance of a Gotha raid on Sheffield. I have a number of books on the Gothas and Zeppelin raids of WW1, but unfortunately they're all in storage at the moment, as we've just moved into our new house, so I'm reduced to searching the web.

A zeppelin raid is more likely, but there were no zeppelin raids on Sheffield until 1916. According to http://www.chrishobb...rstraid1916.htm , Sheffield's first air raid didn't occur until September 25th, 1916, when Zeppelin L22 dropped bombs on Attercliffe. So, if she was killed in Sheffield, there is no chance of her being killed by a zeppelin either.

I checked the CWGC, couldn't find any reference to a Haigh, then realized that CWGC doesn't keep lists of WW1 civilian casualties. I think 'killed' could mean anything that is not a natural death due to age or disease - she could have been run over by a horse, by a car. I think it's too vague to be certain of a war-related death, but anything is possible. She could have been killed in a factory accident.

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From an entry in Gleadless School Log Book, 2nd September 1915.

"Miss Haigh, a teacher in the infant department, was on her bike in Sheffield last night when she was knocked down and killed by a motor lorry"

As reported in "Old Gleadless: Just a little country village" by Pauline Shearstone, page 118.

The following page of the book reproduces the report of Miss Haigh's funeral from The Sheffield Daily Telegraph of Monday 6th September 1915, in which the vehicle is described as a heavy steam lorry

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From an entry in Gleadless School Log Book, 2nd September 1915.

"Miss Haigh, a teacher in the infant department, was on her bike in Sheffield last night when she was knocked down and killed by a motor lorry"

As reported in "Old Gleadless: Just a little country village" by Pauline Shearstone, page 118.

The following page of the book reproduces the report of Miss Haigh's funeral from The Sheffield Daily Telegraph of Monday 6th September 1915, in which the vehicle is described as a heavy steam lorry

Brilliant stuff - well found!

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