Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
taylomax

Sheffield Forge And Rolling Mills

Recommended Posts

These images appear in another Topic, thought I would post them here as they relate to machinery used in rolling mills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The billboards at the lower end of the picture were set on Penistone Rd., and by their position, I would suggest the shot is from Langsett Rd., in the vicinity of Wilcox's furniture shop. from about 1954 until 1971 my folks had a corner beer off/ grocery at the corner of Neepsend Land and Farfield Rd. They served sandwiches, tea, etc. to the workers at Andrews Toledo, as it was known then.

I'd say you are right vicinity of Wilcock's, Jeff Hall Motorcycles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought this may be of interest. I found it on ebay (a picture for sale), and it is described as cica 1920's. The dress of the man at the side may well suggest that date, but the working mens clothes and the structure of the bar mill is very much as I remember when visiting it as a child in the early 1950's.

I also found the following on http://www.sfbhistory.org.uk/Pages/SheffieldatWar/Page05 I remember my father talking about this kind of specialist steel work during the war.

The Sheffield Forge & Rolling Mills Co. Ltd

IN the early days of the war The Sheffield Forge & Rolling Mills Co. Ltd., Millsands Works, was called in to help, with its special sections, in the development of new weapons.

The first request was for a special bomb-release section for heavy bomber planes, and this product was supplied continuously throughout the war, saving many thousands of man-hours in machining.

Forgings were next required for reciprocators on multiple A.A. guns; and then came a demand for forged shafts for the main drive on naval landing craft.

All this time various experimental sections were being made at Millsands Works for the ever-changing Barracuda dive bomber.

Then the Air Ministry wanted a special "V" section to fit over the wing edges of Mosquito planes for cutting balloon cables when in flight. This again was accomplished to the satisfaction of the authorities.

Considerable tonnages of rectangular section were supplied for the links of flail tanks, and a very large output was maintained, over several years, of bright cold drawn bars for Hispano cannon shell and of black rolled bars for the Oerlikon gun.

Hundreds of tons of 2-lb. tank-piercing shell steel were produced, and after the Battle of Alamein, when the superior penetrating power of the German 6-lb. shell was discovered, a rapid turnover on to a British counterpart was ordered and dispatched in big tonnages.

When the submarine menace made it necessary for our ships outside Coastal Command range to be protected, an urgent priority instruction was received for steel sections for making the catapult mechanism used in launching Spitfires from ships. This demand was successfully met in time to save many ships and their cargoes.

The Company was also largely engaged on the production of agricultural plates, sheets and special sections. Over a third of its plant was devoted to this work, producing more than 40,000 tons of such material during the war.

Edited by DaveH
Duplicate quote removed, new member has not added a post to it yet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i started work at sheffield forge in 1957 that mill is SK2 i was cog backer in that mill in 1960 untill 1969 when i moved to australia. my brother worked in the same mill he was our puller out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i started work at sheffield forge in 1957 that mill is SK2 i was cog backer in that mill in 1960 untill 1969 when i moved to australia

A belated welcome to the forum chavey42. Not having worked in the industry, I'd like to know what a cog backer is/was? Sheffield industries were full of terms and names special to them, and many are in danger of being lost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The picture shown is Andrews Toledo works and appears to be taken from the bottom of Ash St,the Sheffield Rolling Mills that I knew as a child was at the Junction of Bridge St and Corporation St. and always looked like hell on earth to me,it made my mind up at an early age never to work in the steel industry.The motorbike shops were,A Clayton near Wilcoxs shop and Motor Spares at the bottom of Greaves St and was owned by Joe Quince of Oughtibridge the other motorbike shops in the area were Leather and Simpson Infirmary Rd and Smiths at the bottom of Henry St also Howard Kenyon near Leathers.

Edited by SteveHB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A belated welcome to the forum chavey42. Not having worked in the industry, I'd like to know what a cog backer is/was? Sheffield industries were full of terms and names special to them, and many are in danger of being lost.

The guy on the far left in the picture is the gog backer is job was to catch the billet and send it back through the bottom rolls

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The guy on the far left in the picture is the gog backer is job was to catch the billet and send it back through the bottom rolls

Thanks, I learn something new every day!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bayleaf raises an interesting point about the names of the different jobs in a rolling mill. My father was (or described himself) as a roller, and for all his working life as I remember it, he was the man at the end of the chain of rolls who finished the rolling. I think he was in charge of the set (is that the right term?). Other specialist jobs I remember (as oppsoed to crane driver and furnaceman) was the 'puller-out' who took the finished rolled bar from the rolls on the last pass (a posting on http://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/archive/index.php/t-71012.html refers to the same job as 'runner out'), to the 'straightener', who if my memory is correct sat in a sort of recess in the floor, and turned and adjusted the finished bar so that it cooled straight. As a very young boy, I knew all about fractions and how to use a micrometer because he taught me as he showed and talked to me about his work which seemed to require an extraordinary degree of accuracy to avoid spoiling the steel - it seemed to be a job that requiered enormous skill, and judgement. I can't imagine that a trade like this will ever be created again (and who would want to work in such appalling conditions), so collecting memories of it is I think important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the risk of over posting on this topic, here is a little more background on Sheffield forge and Rolling Mills from http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Sheffield_Forge_and_Rolling_Mills_Co

Sheffield Forge and Rolling Mills Co of Millsands Works, Sheffield

1872 The company was established on 18 July.

1951 Nationalised under the Iron and Steel Act; became part of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain

1953 Sold by Holding and Realization Agency to Darwins Ltd.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the risk of over posting on this topic, here is a little more background on Sheffield forge and Rolling Mills from http://www.gracesgui...olling_Mills_Co

Sheffield Forge and Rolling Mills Co of Millsands Works, Sheffield

1872 The company was established on 18 July.

1951 Nationalised under the Iron and Steel Act; became part of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain

1953 Sold by Holding and Realization Agency to Darwins Ltd.

Post away, it's all good stuff and very welcome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

     

Two of English Steel Company,s lorries a 8 wheel Albion and Foden

 

 

                                  1394428_325528200964729_152578996462363610015706443_9b409c2de3_o_zpsaefdfd99.thu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder, would "taylomax" have gone to FPGS, as well as Hucklow Road Junior and had a Dad called Dennis and a Mum called Gracie???

Edited by lysander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, this is Hillfoot Bridge where Neepsend Lane meets Penistone Road.  You can see the Neepsend gas holders and what I think is a bin wagon going up to the Parkwood landfill.  In the background, the hill rises up and it must be Pitsmoor - Pitsmoor Road, Pye Bank and the tower blocks on Andover St.

It isn't Millsands, which is way downstream near the Wicker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andrews Toledo shown in the Dave H photo was part of the Darwin Group of Companies..

The Firm i worked for had a building maintenance contract for all the Darwin Group. I started the first weeks of my apprenticeship in 1961 working at the Sheffield Forge and Rolling Mills on Millsands.

I also worked at the bar straightening mill they had on Alma Street,it was located just before the Alma pub (Black Cat) and backed onto Kelham Island

Andrews Toledo was a fascinating place to work for a 15 year old apprentice. The area close to the Electric Arc Furnace was a scary place to be especially when the furnace was being charged up with electricity,lots of flashes and explosions, and to see the men working in the mill catching the glowing metal rod as it came out of the rollers and then twist it over their head and back through the rollers was a sight to behold,these guys certainly earned their pay.

Southside

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/12/2015 at 16:17, sammyopisite said:

     

Two of English Steel Company,s lorries a 8 wheel Albion and Foden

 

 

                                  1394428_325528200964729_1525789964623636740_n_zps8996a838.jpg10015706443_9b409c2de3_o_zpsaefdfd99.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, David Szpajer said:

 

can anybody remember the Truswells horse and cart that carried stuff between no.7 gate grimesthorpe (light press ) to brightside lane ESC. this was in 1963.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a.

 

Incidentally, is "taylomax" who started this thread still around? He and I were , I am pretty sure best pals as little snotty nosed, short trousered boys.My Dad worked for years in the Light Press department and I never heard mention of a horse and cart. He left Grimesthorpe when ESC opened the brand new spring department off Shepcote Lane in the early 60's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×