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W. H. Parkin & Sons


SteveHB
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WH Parkin & Sons & Select Works

188 - 190, Rockingham Street, S1.

Whilst in Town today I noticed this old arched entrance, with the name above.

Being curious as to what was inside, I decided to take a look round.

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A very helpful person who obviously used one of the units in the yard informed me that

this was it's last day ?

Apparently any time from today, the old buildings are due to be flattened to provide a car park area for John Lewis department stores, though no actual date has been confirmed yet.

I was also told about a chap who had just given up his Little Mesters workshop in the yard,

sorry can not remember the name he gave, but the person mentioned is a direct descendant of W. H. Parkin.

Old workshops once backed onto this wall.

Rockingham Street

188 Wingfield Thomas, electro plated cutlery manufacturer.

188 Parkin W. H. & Sons, haft & scale cutters.

190 Johnson Albert, (j), table knife hafter.

190 Chadwick George, buffer.

190 Rotherham Arthur, (j) table knife cutler.

190 HampshireGeo.(j), fork grindr.

190 Speight William, cutler.

190 Grascoigne William, wood turnr.

190 Walker & Tomlinson, cutlers.

190 Nash Jn.(j), table knife hafter.

190 Marshall k Chapman, cutlers.

190 Stones Mrs. Rose, buffer.

190 Robinson Edward, Lodge, cutlr.

190 Bennett George W. (j) silver finisher.

190 Ellis S. M. & Co. electro plated cutlery manufacturers.

190 Hindley Frank W. joiner.

Kelly's 1925.

1890.

Link to Flash Earth

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1911 and 1919 and 1925 (as already mentioned) - all the same

1957 - 188 Rockingham Street, W H Parkin and Sons, bone, haft & scale cutters.
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Looking through a ground floor window

Really interesting stuff and such good pics : its great that you were able to capture all of it. Such a shame that its all going/gone though. :(

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They leave us with a wonderful historic legacy and this tantalising message : bone, haft and scale cutters.

Who can interprit that one?

We leave them with this obscene reply : No Parking. Clamping in Progress.

Society has come a long way!

Excellent pictures Steve, thanks.

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I've been trying to find out where S D Williams had decamped to since they left the Butcher Works and they were there all the time. They provided an excellent service in taking up trouser bottoms, replacing zips etc, and used to do all the alteration work for the big stores. I wonder where they will turn up next. I hope they stay in business.

HD

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Apparently any time from today, the old buildings are due to be flattened to provide a car park area for John Lewis department stores, though no actual date has been confirmed yet.

I wonder if that's dependent on John Lewis rebuilding on the site of the fire station? In the area on Wellington Street between Carver Street and Backfields there's an open site next to the car park and accessed through it, though there's a closed gate preventing access. Quite a few years ago I asked a parking warden why that part of the car park wasn't used, and he told me it belonged to John Lewis, intended as an overspill car park, but they'd never used it.

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Guest mobojambo

I was interested to see this picture reason being I am trying to trace the history of Sydney Parkin who lived in marlborough Road Broomhill. My Father Josesph William Gould married his Daughter Enid Doris Parkin. The 1901 Census shows Sydney as a Cutler. Unfortunately I have no other information to work on.

A shot in the dark....Could there be a link? Can anybody offer any help towards solving my quest.

Thanks.

Mobojambo

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I wonder if that's dependent on John Lewis rebuilding on the site of the fire station? In the area on Wellington Street between Carver Street and Backfields there's an open site next to the car park and accessed through it, though there's a closed gate preventing access. Quite a few years ago I asked a parking warden why that part of the car park wasn't used, and he told me it belonged to John Lewis, intended as an overspill car park, but they'd never used it.

Just watched the local news and John Lewis are now reconsidering their decision to build the new store.

:rolleyes:

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Just a footnote - much of the remaining contents of W H Parkin were acquired by Ken Hawley three or four years ago and transferred to Kelham Island as part of his collection down there. The move was supported by a small grant from Hammersons the intended developers at the time. I suspect the building will not disappear until the city centre redevelopment is back on track

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Just a footnote - much of the remaining contents of W H Parkin were acquired by Ken Hawley three or four years ago and transferred to Kelham Island as part of his collection down there. The move was supported by a small grant from Hammersons the intended developers at the time. I suspect the building will not disappear until the city centre redevelopment is back on track

Thank you for the info.

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My mum worked at parkins in 1960s to her retirement in 1975.it was owned by harry parkin at this time

and produced handles for other cutlery companies

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1 minute ago, madannie77 said:

Still standing empty and rather forlorn:

 

Looks like another R.I.P., (rot in peace). :mellow:

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It is just an old, redundant, brick -built pile...a reminder of our industrial past...with little to commend it ,architecturally, so far as I can see so I wonder why anyone would wish to see it retained? Did anything really important happen there? Was it occupied by any notable? Perhaps someone could illuminate me as to why anyone should be worried...except the Council through loss of revenue. I may be out of step on this one but the urge to preserve anything old seems to be going too far.

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