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Now I've Seen Some Strange Packaging In My Time


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Stuart0742

Have bought things and had stuff sent to me for years from EBAY, I thought I had seen most things used as packaging.

Today I have received an A5 sized booklet (the purchaser knows who he is :rolleyes: ) and the seller has used half an old 33rpm LP cover as the packaging, very strange, obviously the actual disc was not one of his/her favourites.

So the question is What LP is it Title and artist?

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Have bought things and had stuff sent to me for years from EBAY, I thought I had seen most things used as packaging.

Today I have received an A5 sized booklet (the purchaser knows who he is :rolleyes: ) and the seller has used half an old 33rpm LP cover as the packaging, very strange, obviously the actual disc was not one of his/her favourites.

So the question is What LP is it Title and artist?

Party Singalong. Mrs Mills.

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Party Singalong. Mrs Mills.

Yes, that's Mrs Mills, not at the piano but perusing some musical scores.

On this album it appears that she is not just doing a solo piano performance but is accompanied by Geoff Love.

When Stuart lived in a boozer as a kid (Rodley Inn, Rodley Lane, S2, - got that ukelele lady / Richard) they had a juke box, fairly standard juke which held 100 singles and could play up to 200 tracks including all the B sides.

Now, Stuarts pub was no different from any other at that time.

This was the 1960's and most of the records were well played and were some of the best music ever produced in this country, - The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks....need I go on.

However, the last 20 or so discs all seemed to be rubbish, - they were all either Mrs. Mills at the piano or, just for a very minor variation, Winifred Attwell.

I once asked Stuart why they put these discs on, when they could have replaced them with much more popular stuff that people would pay to play'

His answer was, typical of him, a brilliant one.

We used to have a piano in the tap room and on Friday night some old bloke would come and play it for the "old 'uns" who loved it. We had to take the piano out to make room for the juke box and straight away the "old 'uns" didn't like the "modern" music on it and then complained that they couldn't have their Friday night piano sing along any more. The solution was to put the piano singalong records on the juke box so that on Friday night they could play Mrs. Mills / Winifred Attwell and sing along with that.

So, Mrs Mills records were only popularised as an act of appeasement to grumpy old boozers who didn't like juke boxes.

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Yes, that's Mrs Mills, not at the piano but perusing some musical scores.

On this album it appears that she is not just doing a solo piano performance but is accompanied by Geoff Love.

When Stuart lived in a boozer as a kid (Rodley Inn, Rodley Lane, S2, - got that ukelele lady / Richard) they had a juke box, fairly standard juke which held 100 singles and could play up to 200 tracks including all the B sides.

Now, Stuarts pub was no different from any other at that time.

This was the 1960's and most of the records were well played and were some of the best music ever produced in this country, - The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks....need I go on.

However, the last 20 or so discs all seemed to be rubbish, - they were all either Mrs. Mills at the piano or, just for a very minor variation, Winifred Attwell.

I once asked Stuart why they put these discs on, when they could have replaced them with much more popular stuff that people would pay to play'

His answer was, typical of him, a brilliant one.

We used to have a piano in the tap room and on Friday night some old bloke would come and play it for the "old 'uns" who loved it. We had to take the piano out to make room for the juke box and straight away the "old 'uns" didn't like the "modern" music on it and then complained that they couldn't have their Friday night piano sing along any more. The solution was to put the piano singalong records on the juke box so that on Friday night they could play Mrs. Mills / Winifred Attwell and sing along with that.

So, Mrs Mills records were only popularised as an act of appeasement to grumpy old boozers who didn't like juke boxes.

Hey Stuart,

They should have got "Chas 'n Dave" instead lol

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Great reading, Thank you and then there was the silence whereby you could pay to play a disc of nothing at all, again favoured by those that didn't want music (however good that music was).

Yes, that's Mrs Mills, not at the piano but perusing some musical scores.

On this album it appears that she is not just doing a solo piano performance but is accompanied by Geoff Love.

When Stuart lived in a boozer as a kid (Rodley Inn, Rodley Lane, S2, - got that ukelele lady / Richard) they had a juke box, fairly standard juke which held 100 singles and could play up to 200 tracks including all the B sides.

Now, Stuarts pub was no different from any other at that time.

This was the 1960's and most of the records were well played and were some of the best music ever produced in this country, - The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks....need I go on.

However, the last 20 or so discs all seemed to be rubbish, - they were all either Mrs. Mills at the piano or, just for a very minor variation, Winifred Attwell.

I once asked Stuart why they put these discs on, when they could have replaced them with much more popular stuff that people would pay to play'

His answer was, typical of him, a brilliant one.

We used to have a piano in the tap room and on Friday night some old bloke would come and play it for the "old 'uns" who loved it. We had to take the piano out to make room for the juke box and straight away the "old 'uns" didn't like the "modern" music on it and then complained that they couldn't have their Friday night piano sing along any more. The solution was to put the piano singalong records on the juke box so that on Friday night they could play Mrs. Mills / Winifred Attwell and sing along with that.

So, Mrs Mills records were only popularised as an act of appeasement to grumpy old boozers who didn't like juke boxes.

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Great reading, Thank you and then there was the silence whereby you could pay to play a disc of nothing at all, again favoured by those that didn't want music (however good that music was).

A disc which played "silence" for those that didn't like any sort of music would be OK until it got scratched and worn, which they did very quickly in a juke box.

Then the silence would become a really annoying collection of clicks, hisses and crackles

...and that would be more annoying than any of the normal records.

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