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International "talk Like A Pirate" Day (Tomorrow)


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How can you have an INTERNATIONAL talk like a pirate day?

English pirates talk English, French pirates spoke French and Spanish pirates spoke Spanish.

Modern day pirates probably speak in Somalian.

The most famous English pirates seem to have come from the south west (Cornwall, Devon, Somerset, Dorset) as these are maritime counties and so had south west England regional accents.

To me, English pirates just sound like the Worzels after their eleventeenth pint of cider and someone has nicked their brand new combine harvester.

The expression "Oooo AArrrr" seems common to both pirates and Somerset farmers.

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I believe the idea is to talk complete bilge all day and have a laugh; which, is harmless and hopefully funny.

Shiver me timbers !

Hornpipe.

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I believe the idea is to talk complete bilge all day and have a laugh; which, is harmless and hopefully funny.

Shiver me timbers !

Hornpipe.

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To me, English pirates just sound like the Worzels after their eleventeenth pint of cider and someone has nicked their brand new combine harvester.

The expression "Oooo AArrrr" seems common to both pirates and Somerset farmers.

I would be fairly sure that what you are describing is merely a stereotype created by the memorable portrayal of Long John Silver by Robert Newton.

So it is an actor's impression of a fictitious character, portrayed in a film (and TV series) which was based on a novel.

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I remember a comedy programme on Radio 4 I think, some years ago, where they did a pirates sketch. The captain was dividing up the treasure with the crew, when the crew decided they weren't happy. All in proper pirate talk they said they wanted 'a training day at a big 'otel, and a ban on talking in the present tense all the time' . I can't remember the rest but it stuck in my mind, perhaps because I shared an office with our training officer at the time, with all the jargon that that entailed...

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madannie77

I remember a comedy programme on Radio 4 I think, some years ago, where they did a pirates sketch. The captain was dividing up the treasure with the crew, when the crew decided they weren't happy. All in proper pirate talk they said they wanted 'a training day at a big 'otel, and a ban on talking in the present tense all the time' . I can't remember the rest but it stuck in my mind, perhaps because I shared an office with our training officer at the time, with all the jargon that that entailed...

I thinks this is what you is talking of, Bayleaf lol. Not great video (radio shows rarely are), but very funny.

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XKv5ulewTO4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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I would be fairly sure that what you are describing is merely a stereotype created by the memorable portrayal of Long John Silver by Robert Newton.

So it is an actor's impression of a fictitious character, portrayed in a film (and TV series) which was based on a novel.

I thought that idea that pirates spoke in a southwest English accent came from the real pirate who called himself Blackbeard (real name Edward Teach 1680 - 1718) who was from that area (thought to have been born in Bristol). At one point in his notorious career he did negotiate with Britain through an an envoy in the Carribean and was noted for the way he spoke.

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I thinks this is what you is talking of, Bayleaf lol. Not great video (radio shows rarely are), but very funny.

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XKv5ulewTO4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

The very one! Thanks Madannie, you're a treasure yourself! lol lol

(Just as a matter of interest, how on earth did you find it? My description was a bit like we used to get at the library, "I read a book about fifteen years ago, it was so big with a red cover and I think it was about someone and his dog, or it might have been a cat... do you have a copy?")

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