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Building On Cambridge St


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I wonder if anyone can tell me who were the occupants of a boarded up building that is just below the Sportsman Pub on Cambridge St, just above the doorway is a shield like device that has the initials J & S on it accompanied by three crossed swords in a pyramid layout. I suspect it was either a Silversmiths or a Cutlery manufacturer.

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SteveHB

I thought we had a mention on here regarding '28 Cambridge Street'

if we do I can not find it ?

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RichardB

I thought we had a mention on here regarding '28 Cambridge Street'

if we do I can not find it ?

We have the power to sort these kind of things out ...

All 28 Cambridge Street.

I've seen the image for Goodrich in 1871, he's comfortably between number 30 and the Sportsman's so even though he sticks out like a sore thumb - he is correct.

1871

Joseph Goodrich Tailor and Draper

1893

Abraham Blackwell Silversmith (Albert Works)

Brook Brothers Sheffield Bronzing Co. Nickel & silver platers

John Frederick Capewell Table knife manufacturer (Albert Works)

Henry Hardcastle Printer (Albert Works)

Herbert Alexander Rawson Ivory cutter & dealer

1905

Frank E. Elkington Manufacturing silversmiths

Frederick Fidler Engaver

Thomas F. Howard Lancet and Fleam maker, tortoiseshell scale cutter and Dealer (Albert Works)

Benjamin Nicholson Silver buffer and finisher

Thomas Stones Otley Electro-plate manufacturers

Isaac Sadovski Tailor

1911

Louis Harrison Spoon & Fork Manufacturer

John Morton Horn cutter & merchant

Isaac Sadovski Tailor

Bushell & Chapman Manufacturing silversmiths

1925

Willis Bayliss Cutlery manufacturer (Green & Willis)

Culf & Kay Silver turners

A Davies (& Co.) cutlery manufacturers

Green & Willis Cutlery manufacturers

[Nothing for 1919]

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t may be bricked up, but it's still inhabited. The two missing air bricks below the windows are the entrances used by a colony of feral cats. You can often see food left in the spaces for them by well-wishers .

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SteveHB

I wonder if anyone can tell me who were the occupants of a boarded up building that is just below the Sportsman Pub on Cambridge St, just above the doorway is a shield like device that has the initials J & S on it accompanied by three crossed swords in a pyramid layout. I suspect it was either a Silversmiths or a Cutlery manufacturer.

Link .. Mark of the Three X swords

Lots of info here but nothing to fit the initials above the door. "J S"

Could they be the initials of a master cutler ?

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RichardB

I wonder if anyone can tell me who were the occupants of a boarded up building that is just below the Sportsman Pub on Cambridge St, just above the doorway is a shield like device that has the initials J & S on it accompanied by three crossed swords in a pyramid layout. I suspect it was either a Silversmiths or a Cutlery manufacturer.

One for the dog walkers !

Is it "J & S" or just a "J" and an "S" ... just a thought; also much before about 1852 we're looking for Coalpit Lane and not Cambridge Street ...

Am I correct with 1852 ?

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RichardB

One for the dog walkers !

Is it "J & S" or just a "J" and an "S" ... just a thought; also much before about 1852 we're looking for Coalpit Lane and not Cambridge Street ...

Am i Correct with 1852 ?

For consideration :

James Smith & Son, Table knife & file manufacturers, stell converters and merchants, Coalpit Lane; home Sharrow House (White's 1833)

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RichardB

For consideration :

Joseph Smith, Table knife manufacturer and cutlery founder, Court 44 Coalpit Lane; home Pond Street (White's 1852)

Any detailed maps anyone please ? Earlier than the OS.

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RichardB

We shouldn't get too serious about the street numbering ...

William Newbould, victualler Sportsman, 58 Coalpit Lane (1833)

Robert Sherbourne, victualler Sportsman, 26 Coalpit Lane (1841)

John Wilson, Table knife manufacturer and victualler Sportsman, 26 Coalpit Lane (1852)

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SteveHB

One for the dog walkers !

Is it "J & S" or just a "J" and an "S" ... just a thought; also much before about 1852 we're looking for Coalpit Lane and not Cambridge Street ...

Am i Correct with 1852 ?

Did it in 2008, without my dog though. :(

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RichardB

Did it in 2008, without my dog though. :(

Excellent, its been mentioned on here (and elsewhere) before. The stone is from an earlier building - was there mention of some early Cutlers Hall on Coalpit Lane ?

What do you make of those initials ?

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RichardB

Did it in 2008, without my dog though. :(

If that's the JLS light-show they need to buck their ideas up - the sign isn't connected to the electrics !

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RichardB

Excellent, its been mentioned on here (and elsewhere) before. The stone is from an earlier building - was there mention of some early Cutlers Hall on Coalpit Lane ?

What do you make of those initials ?

Going down Coal Pitt Lane, this street used to be a very narrow low lane. There has been buried many a Hundred good Self-Tip handles and good bone nogs in this Street. I lived in this Street 26 years and it has been twice dug up and set again while I lived in it. At each of these times I have seen the men dig up barrows full of good

Self Tip handles, when they was thrown away they no doubt did not know the way to straighten them as they appear'd all to be Crook'd, and I have seen the men dig up many a wheelbarrow full of bone nogs, but not fit for use, but they have sold them to Mr. Saml. Pass who lived opposite the Well Yard and used to buy bone dust. He told

me himself that: he has paid the men 2 Pounds in one week for these nogs as bone dust. The men had this for their allowance for Drink.

Nearly at the top of the street is a large dwelling (now turned into two) house which has a Court before it. Mr. Linley, Shear Smith, lives in part of it now. This is said was once the old Cutlers' Hall.

Previous ramblings of a madman.

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This by email from Ron Clayton.

Andy,

I've come across this stone before and been wary of flagging it up in case it 'walks'. Daft I know but it ought to go somewhere safe before Sevenstone starts up.Coal Pit Lane[Cambridge St]had a house in the C17th with the crossed daggers [Cutlers Company] and a door lintel with the initials LJS. There is a drawing by W. Topham [1877 showing a Cutlers House with a different sort of stone above the doorway - its not a million miles away from the location of the one in question. I think someone has said that it could indicate the owner had been master cutler.

Regards Ron

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SteveHB

This by email from Ron Clayton.

Andy,

I've come across this stone before and been wary of flagging it up in case it 'walks'. Daft I know but it ought to go somewhere safe before Sevenstone starts up.Coal Pit Lane[Cambridge St]had a house in the C17th with the crossed daggers [Cutlers Company] and a door lintel with the initials LJS. There is a drawing by W. Topham [1877 showing a Cutlers House with a different sort of stone above the doorway - its not a million miles away from the location of the one in question. I think someone has said that it could indicate the owner had been master cutler.

Regards Ron

Could it be the same stone above the doorway .. picturesheffield

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RichardB

Could it be the same stone above the doorway .. picturesheffield

Well found that man ! Have a Fairie badge.

Going down Coal Pitt Lane, this street used to be a very narrow low lane. There has been buried many a Hundred good Self-Tip handles and good bone nogs in this Street. I lived in this Street 26 years and it has been twice dug up and set again while I lived in it. At each of these times I have seen the men dig up barrows full of good

Self Tip handles, when they was thrown away they no doubt did not know the way to straighten them as they appear'd all to be Crook'd, and I have seen the men dig up many a wheelbarrow full of bone nogs, but not fit for use, but they have sold them to Mr. Saml. Pass who lived opposite the Well Yard and used to buy bone dust. He told

me himself that: he has paid the men 2 Pounds in one week for these nogs as bone dust. The men had this for their allowance for Drink.

Nearly at the top of the street is a large dwelling (now turned into two) house which has a Court before it. Mr. Linley, Shear Smith, lives in part of it now. This is said was once the old Cutlers' Hall.

[it was an old popular delusion that this, and other houses on which some Master Cutler, in his pride of office, displayed the Cutlers' Arms, had been the Cutlers' Hall. It is hardly necessary to say that all the Cutlers' Halls, in succession, have been on the present site.]

From : A description of ... written in 1832, so, we are chipping away at the dates ...

http://www.sheffield...p?showtopic=850

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RichardB

Did it in 2008, without my dog though. :(

John Linley, Sheffield, Master Cutler in 1797 ...

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RichardB

We shouldn't get too serious about the street numbering ...

George Linley Wool & garden shear, cinder shovel &c. manufacturer 60 Coalpit Lane Baine's 1822

George Linley manufacturer of weavers shears, nippers, loom knives, butcher and cook knives, silk nippers, engine spindles for silks, magnets, sheep shears, horse and woolster's shears, sinder shovels, cut clog nails and bill clogs, shoe clasps, edge tools, drawing knives &c. 6 Coalpit Lane Gells 1825

George Linley Shear & Makers Coalpit Lane Pigot's 1828-9

George Linley manufacturer of weavers shears, nippers, loom knives, butcher and cook knives, silk nippers, engine spindles for silks, magnets, sheep shears, horse and woolster's shears, sinder shovels, cut clog nails and bill clogs, shoe clasps, edge tools, drawing knives &c. 60 Coalpit Lane Blackwell 1829

George Linley sheep shear, cut nail, clasp &c. manufacturer 60 Coalpit Lane White's 1833

George Linley Clasp maker 60 Coalpit Lane Pigot's 1834

George Linley Nail maker 60 Coalpit Lane Pigot's 1834

George Linley Shear &c. makers 60 Coalpit Lane Pigot's 1834

George Linley sheep shear, cut nail, clasp &c. manufacturer 59 Coalpit Lane White's 1837

George Linley Clasp maker 60 Coalpit Lane Pigot's 1841

George Linley Nail maker 22 Coalpit Lane Pigot's 1841

George Linley Shear &c. maker 22 Coalpit Lane Pigot's 1841

George Linley Manufacturer of sheep and horse shears, cut nails and clasps 22 Coalpit Lane Rodgers 1841

William Linley Table knife manufacturer 29 Coalpit Lane Rodgers 1841

George Linley Clasp maker 60 Coalpit Lane Slaters 1846

George Linley Nail makers (cut) 22 Coalpit Lane Slaters 1846

George Linley Shear &c. makers 22 Coalpit Lane Slaters 1846

Linley (Bros.) sheep shear makers &c. 2 Coalpit Lane White's 1849

William Linley Sheep shear &c. manufacturer School Croft; h. Ct. 16 Coalpit Lane White's 1852

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Well found that man ! Have a Fairie badge.

Going down Coal Pitt Lane, this street used to be a very narrow low lane. There has been buried many a Hundred good Self-Tip handles and good bone nogs in this Street. I lived in this Street 26 years and it has been twice dug up and set again while I lived in it. At each of these times I have seen the men dig up barrows full of good

Self Tip handles, when they was thrown away they no doubt did not know the way to straighten them as they appear'd all to be Crook'd, and I have seen the men dig up many a wheelbarrow full of bone nogs, but not fit for use, but they have sold them to Mr. Saml. Pass who lived opposite the Well Yard and used to buy bone dust. He told

me himself that: he has paid the men 2 Pounds in one week for these nogs as bone dust. The men had this for their allowance for Drink.

Nearly at the top of the street is a large dwelling (now turned into two) house which has a Court before it. Mr. Linley, Shear Smith, lives in part of it now. This is said was once the old Cutlers' Hall.

[it was an old popular delusion that this, and other houses on which some Master Cutler, in his pride of office, displayed the Cutlers' Arms, had been the Cutlers' Hall. It is hardly necessary to say that all the Cutlers' Halls, in succession, have been on the present site.]

From : A description of ... written in 1832, so, we are chipping away at the dates ...

http://www.sheffield...p?showtopic=850

The Master Cutler connection seems believeable as does the Table Knife manufacturer James Smith, could it be that when Mr Smith took possesion of the premises the Shield and its inscription fitted his name so he kept it in situe. The reason for the initial enquiry is it will probably be in the Stars supplement THE RETRO in a week or two.Thanks for everybodys input, such a wealth of knowledge on this Forum.

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RichardB

The Master Cutler connection seems believeable as does the Table Knife manufacturer James Smith, could it be that when Mr Smith took possesion of the premises the Shield and its inscription fitted his name so he kept it in situe. The reason for the initial enquiry is it will probably be in the Stars supplement THE RETRO in a week or two.Thanks for everybodys input, such a wealth of knowledge on this Forum.

There will be more, but I can't get my head around what I've found - I'll drop it for someone intelligent to see if they can get it into a proper order - the reference code for this top secret project is "Plant" - don't tell !

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The Initials on the Shield above the door could may well be the ones of a Master Cutler as JOHN SANSOM was the M.C. in 1834 and the following year 1835 a JOHN SPENCER was M.C. so could it be that the initials are one of these men?

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  • 8 years later...

Had a look at this yesterday and it's still there surrounded by all the demolition and building going on around it. Any further thoughts/information?

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