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History Of The Building Next Door To The Wisewood Inn

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If anyone out there knows anything about the history of the building next to the Wisewood Inn pub currrently know as 'Rose Villa' 533 Loxley Road ,I'd love to hear more. I understand it was a former Forge, but this doesn't seem to fit ,due to it's distance from the river Loxley, but what do I know???

It was converted some years ago to a dwelling from a cottage and some out buildings. Very curious to understand the previous use of the former outbuildings.

Hope someone can assist!!!

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If anyone out there knows anything about the history of the building next to the Wisewood Inn pub currrently know as 'Rose Villa' 533 Loxley Road ,I'd love to hear more. I understand it was a former Forge, but this doesn't seem to fit ,due to it's distance from the river Loxley, but what do I know???

It was converted some years ago to a dwelling from a cottage and some out buildings. Very curious to understand the previous use of the former outbuildings.

Hope someone can assist!!!

It could have been a forge as in where a blacksmith would have worked.

Edit: Rose Vill e on the 1883 map poses another question.

Edited by vox
Afterthought

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It could have been a forge as in where a blacksmith would have worked.

Edit: Rose Vill e on the 1883 map poses another question.

It certainly looks like a little blacksmiths forge but the one I remember was located at the side of the original Admiral Rodney pub. It's last owner was a Mr. Harry Fletcher who was killed in a vehicle accident in 1975. I used to stand at the door and watch him shoeing horses when I was a kid. Very interesting but a bit pungent on the nose.

HD

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It certainly looks like a little blacksmiths forge but the one I remember was located at the side of the original Admiral Rodney pub. It's last owner was a Mr. Harry Fletcher who was killed in a vehicle accident in 1975. I used to stand at the door and watch him shoeing horses when I was a kid. Very interesting but a bit pungent on the nose.

HD

Thanks very much for that!!

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Thanks very much for that!!

You're welcome lol

It doesn't seem to appear on the earlier map but could possibly have been built as a stable. Nowadays we take cars for granted but in the 1800's middle class people in rural areas rode on horses or in a pony and trap. Even in urban Hillsborough where I lived as a kid many of the bigger houses had a small stable tucked down the side, used as a garage nowadays.

HD

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You're welcome lol

It doesn't seem to appear on the earlier map but could possibly have been built as a stable. Nowadays we take cars for granted but in the 1800's middle class people in rural areas rode on horses or in a pony and trap. Even in urban Hillsborough where I lived as a kid many of the bigger houses had a small stable tucked down the side, used as a garage nowadays.

HD

Here is the smithy (1902) next to the original Admiral Rodney PH.

This is the Wisewood PH taken from the same map.

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Here is the smithy (1902) next to the original Admiral Rodney PH.

This is the Wisewood PH taken from the same map.

The Admiral Rodney in the 1950's was my fathers' second home, it would have been his first home if the opening hours had been longer. I spent a good part of my early life sat outside with a bottle of Vimto and a packet of crisps or sometimes Paynes Poppets. Every time someone bought a round inside, out would come another Vimto, I still like it !

As he was one of their best customers, his eldest son (me) was invited to things like the family Christmas Parties. I remember hearing my recorded voice for the first time on an early reel to reel recorder with paper-backed recording tape. The private quarters were very cosy and nicely furnished with wall to wall fitted carpets, the first I'd seen.. From memory the outbuildings were much the same as the 1902 map with the ladies toilets on the back of the old smithy.

On warm summer nights there would be a queue of women with pained expressions waiting outside. The map shows the building divided into three but by the fifties the pub had taken over at least the two left hand properties if not all three.

The horse trough just below had a arch covered section for humans and the water in a cupped hand tasted wonderful, no chlorine, ( and I'm still here---just :o ).

HD

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The Admiral Rodney in the 1950's was my fathers' second home, it would have been his first home if the opening hours had been longer. I spent a good part of my early life sat outside with a bottle of Vimto and a packet of crisps or sometimes Paynes Poppets. Every time someone bought a round inside, out would come another Vimto, I still like it !

As he was one of their best customers, his eldest son (me) was invited to things like the family Christmas Parties. I remember hearing my recorded voice for the first time on an early reel to reel recorder with paper-backed recording tape. The private quarters were very cosy and nicely furnished with wall to wall fitted carpets, the first I'd seen.. From memory the outbuildings were much the same as the 1902 map with the ladies toilets on the back of the old smithy.

On warm summer nights there would be a queue of women with pained expressions waiting outside. The map shows the building divided into three but by the fifties the pub had taken over at least the two left hand properties if not all three.

The horse trough just below had a arch covered section for humans and the water in a cupped hand tasted wonderful, no chlorine, ( and I'm still here---just ).

HD

Intereting about the smithy. I remember passing the Rodney in the late 60's, early 70's(?) and in the car park was a farrier with a mobile forge, shoeing a horse.

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Intereting about the smithy. I remember passing the Rodney in the late 60's, early 70's(?) and in the car park was a farrier with a mobile forge, shoeing a horse.

Something else I've remembered about the smithy, which stood at right-angles to the road, was that on the side facing the pub were a couple of petrol pumps. Imagine siting petrol pumps and storage tanks next door to a blacksmith's hearth.

What brought it to mind was a recollection that a lad I knew at school obtained employment there for a very short time.

Left on his own one day he directed the petrol delivery driver to put several hundred gallons of 4 star into the 3 star tank. This then had to be sold as cheaper 3 star. Hence his short employment. I think the forge was still there well after the building of the new pub and was only demolished after the death of Mr. Fletcher in 1975. If you stand at the entrance to the present car park, the forge was just inside on the left and the old pub to the right.

HD

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