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William Broadhead / Outrages

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Hi

I'm doing some work on the impact of the Sheffield outrages, both in terms of historiography and local importance. I was wondering if anyone could suggest any books or websites that have writing that is especially in favour or against the outrages and what Woodhead helped to lead?

Im also wondering if anyone knows if any parts of Sheffield were named after him, other members of unions, the events themselves or the like?

Im trying to create some resources to help my pupils asses the significance of the outrages as they are a fascinating period of our History. Anything that could help with this; historian's opinions, some written evidence about the impact it had on helping shape Sheffield's "left wing" or independent character etc...would be great!

Thanks

Tom

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Hello Always Learning and Welcome to SheffieldHistory.

This Rattening thread contains a variety of resources, icluding some 1860's newspapers I bought and Stuart kindly scanned on our behalf. Hope you find something there of interest.

Please keep us updated, I'd love to see more information.

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Trades Union Commission "The Sheffield Outrages" with an introduction by Sidney Pollard.

First published 1867; my copy is a 1971 reprint by Adams & Dart.

SBN (presumably a forerunner to ISBN) 239.00045.5

452 rather dull pages of the Commissions inquiries; contains lots of interviews and names and places but you'd have to seriously interested in the topic to stay awake, or even alive, throughout the whole book.

1971 reprint is covered by copyright, if we can locate an original copy scanned or transcribed online it would be linked in the Rattening thread. Maybe ask at the local library (I'm not very local) or maybe, someone in Sheffield has a copy ...

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Trades Union Commission "The Sheffield Outrages" with an introduction by Sidney Pollard.

First published 1867; my copy is a 1971 reprint by Adams & Dart.

SBN (presumably a forerunner to ISBN) 239.00045.5

452 rather dull pages of the Commissions inquiries; contains lots of interviews and names and places but you'd have to seriously interested in the topic to stay awake, or even alive, throughout the whole book.

1971 reprint is covered by copyright, if we can locate an original copy scanned or transcribed online it would be linked in the Rattening thread. Maybe ask at the local library (I'm not very local) or maybe, someone in Sheffield has a copy ...

Thanks for that Richard. I've read that intro and it is very useful, I will have a good trawl through the thread on here. You have some great stuff, thanks for that. Its a long process with making stuff for kid, isolating exactly what is relevant...but great fun on the way!

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Thanks for that Richard. I've read that intro and it is very useful, I will have a good trawl through the thread on here. You have some great stuff, thanks for that. Its a long process with making stuff for kid, isolating exactly what is relevant...but great fun on the way!

There is still one outstanding question I have posed on this topic ... what makes the Sheffield Outrages almost unique in British legal history ? Not sure of relevance/interest to kids, but it is an interesting answer (when we get there, that is).

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There is still one outstanding question I have posed on this topic ... what makes the Sheffield Outrages almost unique in British legal history ? Not sure of relevance/interest to kids, but it is an interesting answer (when we get there, that is).

Are you referring to the pardons that the union members got? I found that fascinating...let the individuals off so that the working class can incriminate themsleves in general as thieving good for nothing people, especiallywith a second reform act on the way!

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The Trades' Unions of England - Louis-Philippe-Albert d'Orleans Paris, Nassau J. Senior. (1869)

up to page 20; I didn't look any further

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=7eElAAAAMAAJ&dq=sheffield%20coalpit&pg=PA12#v=onepage&q&f=false

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SHEFFIELD TRADES UNION OUTRAGES

The Illustrated Police News etc (London, England), Saturday, June 29, 1867;

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Hi Tom

The 'Sheffield Outrages' are a fascinating aspect of Sheffield's Trade Union history. We've just published a Study Guide to Sources on the Sheffield Outrages. You can download it for free at: http://www.sheffield.gov.uk/libraries/archives-and-local-studies/publications/sheffield-outrages

It lists all the key primary and secondary sources available at Sheffield Archives and Local Studies Library. It also features a timeline, images, extracts from the Royal Commission, a glossary of terms and a guide to 'who's who' in the outrages.

Contact us if you want to see any of the documents on the list.

Best wishes,

Cheryl, Sheffield Archives

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Hi,

I'm a Sheffield lass by birth and studying at University of Leeds. I'm planning to do my 3rd year dissertation on the Outrages/William Broadhead so this looks like a great place to start!

My ancestors were in the Iron trade primarily around this period, in the Darnall area and it was genealogical research that first led me to this interesting piece of Steel City history.

There don't seem to have been many major works covering the outrages in detail, and I'd like to find an angle that will provide a great hook for 12,000 words! I have a copy of the Pollard Intro'd report, which makes fascinating reading. Mine is a slightly musty 1971 Adams & Dart copy.

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Hi,

I'm a Sheffield lass by birth and studying at University of Leeds. I'm planning to do my 3rd year dissertation on the Outrages/William Broadhead so this looks like a great place to start!

My ancestors were in the Iron trade primarily around this period, in the Darnall area and it was genealogical research that first led me to this interesting piece of Steel City history.

There don't seem to have been many major works covering the outrages in detail, and I'd like to find an angle that will provide a great hook for 12,000 words! I have a copy of the Pollard Intro'd report, which makes fascinating reading. Mine is a slightly musty 1971 Adams & Dart copy.

Hi and welcome to the Forum. There's another topic if you haven't already found it. It includes Pollard on the Ethics of the Sheffield Outrages, among other things. Good luck with the research!

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Sounds interesting, keep us posted. Would like to read it one day !

Hi,

I'm a Sheffield lass by birth and studying at University of Leeds. I'm planning to do my 3rd year dissertation on the Outrages/William Broadhead so this looks like a great place to start!

My ancestors were in the Iron trade primarily around this period, in the Darnall area and it was genealogical research that first led me to this interesting piece of Steel City history.

There don't seem to have been many major works covering the outrages in detail, and I'd like to find an angle that will provide a great hook for 12,000 words! I have a copy of the Pollard Intro'd report, which makes fascinating reading. Mine is a slightly musty 1971 Adams & Dart copy.

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On 27/05/2011 at 16:21, Always learning said:

Hi

 

I'm doing some work on the impact of the Sheffield outrages, both in terms of historiography and local importance. I was wondering if anyone could suggest any books or websites that have writing that is especially in favour or against the outrages and what Woodhead helped to lead?

 

Im also wondering if anyone knows if any parts of Sheffield were named after him, other members of unions, the events themselves or the like?

 

Im trying to create some resources to help my pupils asses the significance of the outrages as they are a fascinating period of our History. Anything that could help with this; historian's opinions, some written evidence about the impact it had on helping shape Sheffield's "left wing" or independent character etc...would be great!

 

Thanks

 

Tom

Hi Tom, I know this is an old post but I have recently come across a very interesting book by Mick Drewry. It is called "Intimidation. The history, The times and the people of the Sheffield Outrages".

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I think your pupils might find the local play...produced, amongst others at the Crucible and very, very popular some years ago...a tad more accessible/interesting than some of the rather dry stuff already mentioned. The play is entitled..."The Stirrings in Sheffield on a Saturday Night".

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