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Hmv Radiogram

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I have a 1940 HMV All-World Press-Button Radiogram, Model 1500 free for collection. It lights up but there is no sound, it comes with the instruction card and a few repair bills. It is complete and apart trom a few deep scratches in places its not in bad condition for its age. Would fit in the rear of a hatchback with the seats down. If interested please PM me your number. Regards, W/E.

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DaveH    4

I have a 1940 HMV All-World Press-Button Radiogram, Model 1500 free for collection. It lights up but there is no sound, it comes with the instruction card and a few repair bills. It is complete and apart trom a few deep scratches in places its not in bad condition for its age. Would fit in the rear of a hatchback with the seats down. If interested please PM me your number. Regards, W/E.

I can't say I am in the market or even have room in the house for such an interesting historic piece of equipment W/E, but I still find it fascinating.

Have you any pictures of it you could post?

It will of course be an all valve device, - predating transitor technology by several years.

The "All World" bit indicates that the (AM only) radio will be long, medium, and short wave (LW, MW, SW)

The LW and MW of this vintage predate BBC numbered stations (R1, R2, R3, R4 etc) and will carry names like "Light Programme", "Home Service" and "Third Network".

The MW will also carry other foreign station names which have now passed into history like Hilversum (Holland), Kallundberg (Denmark), Allouis (France) and of course Radio Luxembourg.

The thing that makes it an all world receiver is of course the short wave (SW) band. At this time broadcast receivers typically covered 6 of the short wavebands, 49, 41, 31, 25, 19 and 16 metrebands.

The interesting thing about this receiver is the "push button" bit as it dates from an era when switches, knobs and dials were the norm, - push buttons were still very "modern"

The gramophone part of the radiogram is also interesting as in the 1940's almost all records were 78rpm singles, - the LP and 45rpm single of 60's "pop" music were still in the future. But there were both 10" and longer play (mainly Jazz) 12" heavy, rigid, shellac 78 rpm records available.

Again the interest here is in the needle / stylus. By the 1940's steel "play once / up to ten times" needles were the norm for 78 rpm but there were also iridium tipped "long life" needles (made by songster) and the saphire / diamond "stylus" was only just in the future giving 400 - 1000 hours of play time.

Also, many radiograms, as opposed to gramophones, were multi play and could take a stack of 8 to 10 records on a mechanical autochanger which used the classic "dropping stunt" as my grandad used to call it.

It would be nice to see pictures of this radiogram W/E, so although you are keen to dispose of it to a good home why not take some pictures and post them on here to preserve a piece of history.

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I can't say I am in the market or even have room in the house for such an interesting historic piece of equipment W/E, but I still find it fascinating.

Have you any pictures of it you could post?

Will try and get some posted next week. W/E.

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DaveH    4

Will try and get some posted next week. W/E.

If it's old HMV (His Masters Voice) it could be carrying an image like this.

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If it's old HMV (His Masters Voice) it could be carrying an image like this.

No interest, so I will have a go at getting it repaired. May have a problem sneaking it in the house though ! W/E.

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DaveH    4

No interest, so I will have a go at getting it repaired. May have a problem sneaking it in the house though ! W/E.

I fine and very interesting piece of kit Waterside Echo.

It has the traditional and instantly recognisable "HMV" badge inside the lid but with a "Hayes Middlesex" address (The largest radiogram factory in the British Empire!!! :blink: ) that I recognise as the EMI gramophone company address (Look on the label or sleeve of any EMI company record and that is the address they give. The Guarantee letter does explain this.

Not sure what all those push buttons do but they look impressive don't they. They would have been even more impressive when it was new, - quite an upmarket high quality addition for an early 1940's piece.

The record player (gramophone) from the bit I can see appears to be single speed (78rpm) and also single play as the deck is not very deeply recessed to allow for a stack of discs if it is intended to be played with the lid closed. This would mean opening the lid every few minutes to change the record.

But the real interesting bit is that radio dial marked up with all those foreign stations. Interestingly the SW section includes the 13m band (usually they go down to the 16m band only) but is missing the 41 m Band (which is actually a broadcast band shared with the 40 m amateur band) From left to right the marked bands are 13, 16, 18, 25, 31 and 49 m bands. Disappointingly the selection of stations for each band seems to be pretty much the same.

The MW band has a much bigger, and better laid out, selection of stations, set off nicely with that vernier tuning wheel on the left and volume indicator on the right. Not many British stations but some classic continental ones named.

Interestingly on the LW section the BBC home service is given as Droitwich, the transmitter location.

That valve in the last picture looks like the old style octal base with central locator lug. It could be, for example (it's not sharp enough to read) a Mullard EL33 triod pentode valve which looks like this.

If it is this valve that has gone you may have a job finding a replacement for it and it won't be cheap, - unless hilldweller knows of a supplier.

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Stuart0742    4

I fine and very interesting piece of kit Waterside Echo.

It has the traditional and instantly recognisable "HMV" badge inside the lid but with a "Hayes Middlesex" address (The largest radiogram factory in the British Empire!!! :blink: ) that I recognise as the EMI gramophone company address (Look on the label or sleeve of any EMI company record and that is the address they give. The Guarantee letter does explain this.

Not sure what all those push buttons do but they look impressive don't they. They would have been even more impressive when it was new, - quite an upmarket high quality addition for an early 1940's piece.

The record player (gramophone) from the bit I can see appears to be single speed (78rpm) and also single play as the deck is not very deeply recessed to allow for a stack of discs if it is intended to be played with the lid closed. This would mean opening the lid every few minutes to change the record.

But the real interesting bit is that radio dial marked up with all those foreign stations. Interestingly the SW section includes the 13m band (usually they go down to the 16m band only) but is missing the 41 m Band (which is actually a broadcast band shared with the 40 m amateur band) From left to right the marked bands are 13, 16, 18, 25, 31 and 49 m bands. Disappointingly the selection of stations for each band seems to be pretty much the same.

The MW band has a much bigger, and better laid out, selection of stations, set off nicely with that vernier tuning wheel on the left and volume indicator on the right. Not many British stations but some classic continental ones named.

Interestingly on the LW section the BBC home service is given as Droitwich, the transmitter location.

That valve in the last picture looks like the old style octal base with central locator lug. It could be, for example (it's not sharp enough to read) a Mullard EL33 triod pentode valve which looks like this.

If it is this valve that has gone you may have a job finding a replacement for it and it won't be cheap, - unless hilldweller knows of a supplier.

A quick Google search brings up a few sites that deal in Valves and old electronic stuff

What about Bardwells

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DaveH    4

A quick Google search brings up a few sites that deal in Valves and old electronic stuff

What about Bardwells

Bardwells is still there on Abbeydale Road and may be worth a try

But they seem to be more into old computers these days than old radios

They have moved along with modern trends in electronics even though they still sell old stuff.

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A quick Google search brings up a few sites that deal in Valves and old electronic stuff

What about Bardwells

We have a guy [pete] a few doors down who has played the clubs and pubs for years, his house is stacked high with old amplifiers and speakers etc, I will have a word with him first. W/E.

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I have a 1940 HMV All-World Press-Button Radiogram, Model 1500 free for collection. It lights up but there is no sound, it comes with the instruction card and a few repair bills. It is complete and apart trom a few deep scratches in places its not in bad condition for its age. Would fit in the rear of a hatchback with the seats down. If interested please PM me your number. Regards, W/E.

No one wanted it, no joy in getting it working, no chance of getting it over the threshold even if I had! So what do you do? chop it up, dump it on the doorstep of DaveH, or what. Ebay was the answer, put it on for £25, a guy from Hungary bought it and is sending a courier to pick it upon Monday, not holding my breath though! W/E.

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DaveH    4

No one wanted it, no joy in getting it working, no chance of getting it over the threshold even if I had! So what do you do? chop it up, dump it on the doorstep of DaveH, or what. Ebay was the answer, put it on for £25, a guy from Hungary bought it and is sending a courier to pick it upon Monday, not holding my breath though! W/E.

Perhaps he has the complete collection of Listz Hungarian Rhapsodies (all 40 of them) on the 78rpm records produced by Deutche Gramaphon and wants something to play them on.

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jiginc    0

It has the traditional and instantly recognisable "HMV" badge inside the lid but with a "Hayes Middlesex" address (The largest radiogram factory in the British Empire!!! ) that I recognise as the EMI gramophone company address (Look on the label or sleeve of any EMI company record and that is the address they give. The Guarantee letter does explain this.

The factory at 135 Blyth Road Hayes Middlesex that made the wooden cabinets was called (would you believe it) the cabinet factory it later became the production site for the EMI CT scanner but still known as the cabinet factory.

When I was last in it It still had the smell of the varnish used to finish the cabinets that must have been in about 1985 following the demise of EMI Medical.

jiginc

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No one wanted it, no joy in getting it working, no chance of getting it over the threshold even if I had! So what do you do? chop it up, dump it on the doorstep of DaveH, or what. Ebay was the answer, put it on for £25, a guy from Hungary bought it and is sending a courier to pick it upon Monday, not holding my breath though! W/E.

Viszuntlatasra! W/E.

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SteveHB    9

Viszuntlatasra! W/E.

Ha ha ha, it has gone then ... lol

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DaveH    4

It has the traditional and instantly recognisable "HMV" badge inside the lid but with a "Hayes Middlesex" address (The largest radiogram factory in the British Empire!!! ) that I recognise as the EMI gramophone company address (Look on the label or sleeve of any EMI company record and that is the address they give. The Guarantee letter does explain this.

The factory at 135 Blyth Road Hayes Middlesex that made the wooden cabinets was called (would you believe it) the cabinet factory it later became the production site for the EMI CT scanner but still known as the cabinet factory.

When I was last in it It still had the smell of the varnish used to finish the cabinets that must have been in about 1985 following the demise of EMI Medical.

jiginc

Many companies eventually came under the EMI umbrella of companies.

This happened to Marconi / Marconiphone models.

However, I didn't think that this had happened to HMV.

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DaveH    4

Viszuntlatasra! W/E.

So now HMV must stand for Hungarian (Magyar) Voice. ;-)

Next stop Budapest, - nice city, spent some time there last summer.

By the way, don't let the guy try to pay you in Hungarian Forints.

They are only used in Hungary and aren't worth a deal.

We were getting around 380 Forint to the £

So your £25 would be about 9500 Forint

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vox    1

Viszuntlatasra! W/E.

That's impressive WE

Good result

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DaveH    4

That's impressive WE

Good result

Yes £25 for a valve powered (hard to replace when they fail) radiogram from the 1940's, which has a traditional AM MW/LW radio (soon to be obsolete due to DAB taking over) and a gramophone that can only play 78rpm records (became obsolete in favour of the 45rpm single in 1960) is a pretty good price.

Whats more it will have cost the guy more than that in fuel to travel half way across Europe and back just to collect it.

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Stuart0742    4

Whats more it will have cost the guy more than that in fuel to travel half way across Europe and back just to collect it.

Perhaps he was already here :P delivering Hungarian stuff to Sheffield

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DaveH    4

Perhaps he was already here :P delivering Hungarian stuff to Sheffield

That would halve his journey and his cost.

Take it from me Stuart, Hungary is a hell of a long way by road.

Anyway, - what Hungarian stuff do we get in Sheffield?

Is there a Hungarian restraunt that does a fantastic goulash?

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Yes £25 for a valve powered (hard to replace when they fail) radiogram from the 1940's, which has a traditional AM MW/LW radio (soon to be obsolete due to DAB taking over) and a gramophone that can only play 78rpm records (became obsolete in favour of the 45rpm single in 1960) is a pretty good price.

Well, he must know something we don't. He seems to be buying old mechanical and valve type HMV record playing equipment trom all over Europe, along with 78rpm records and accessories. Maybe the electronic revolution is ending sooner than we think. Best get the old BTH crystal set out W/E.

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DaveH    4

Well, he must know something we don't. He seems to be buying old mechanical and valve type HMV record playing equipment trom all over Europe, along with 78rpm records and accessories. Maybe the electronic revolution is ending sooner than we think. Best get the old BTH crystal set out W/E.

Perhaps he is just an enthusiast / collector of this type of vintage equipment or is starting a museum or something.

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jiginc    0

Many companies eventually came under the EMI umbrella of companies. This happened to Marconi / Marconiphone models. However, I didn't think that this had happened to HMV.

I cannot remember Marconi ever being an EMI Company.

English Electric acquired The Marconi Company in 1946

In 1967 or 1968 English Electric was subject to a takeover bid by the Plessey Company but chose instead to accept an offer from GEC

In 1999 GEC underwent a major transformation. GEC, realigning itself as a primarily telecommunications company following the MES sale, retained the Marconi brand and renamed itself Marconi plc.

In October 2005 the Marconi name and most of the assets were proposed to be bought by the Swedish firm Ericsson. The transaction was completed on January 23, 2006 effective as per January 1, 2006. The Marconi name will still be used as brand within Ericsson.

The early 405 line TV systems were known as the Marconi-EMI system but I do not remember either company being one.

jiginc

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DaveH    4

I cannot remember Marconi ever being an EMI Company.

English Electric acquired The Marconi Company in 1946

In 1967 or 1968 English Electric was subject to a takeover bid by the Plessey Company but chose instead to accept an offer from GEC

In 1999 GEC underwent a major transformation. GEC, realigning itself as a primarily telecommunications company following the MES sale, retained the Marconi brand and renamed itself Marconi plc.

In October 2005 the Marconi name and most of the assets were proposed to be bought by the Swedish firm Ericsson. The transaction was completed on January 23, 2006 effective as per January 1, 2006. The Marconi name will still be used as brand within Ericsson.

The early 405 line TV systems were known as the Marconi-EMI system but I do not remember either company being one.

jiginc

Sure you will be right about the history of the company.

I said that because I remember once owning a 1950's valve portable radio which was powered by either AC mains or a set of D type batteries (for the valve heaters) and a strange and rather dangerous 90V (yes 90 volt) HT battery. The aeriel was a loop of wire built into the lid, and the lid was marked "Marconi - EMI" (or it may have been "Marconiphone - EMI", which gave me the impression that they were a joint company. Further, as Marconi / Marconiphone is long gone and EMI is still around I assumed that the "merger" would have been to EMI.

Thanks for the correction on this point.

I also have a vague but more recent memory from TV news in the 1980's of a company called something like Marconi / Marconiphone having a Government Ministry of Defence contract for some "secret" electronic stuff and some of their young electronic engineers went missing or were found dead in mysterious circumstances.

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If anyone else wants information or advice on repairing old TV and Radios or has one to sell or give away, you can have a look at this website:

Vintage Radio Forum

If you feel like joining the forum, please don't mention E-Bay as you can get banned for that! Apart from that it's an excellent place if you need advice on repairs to old radios etc.

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