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SteveHB

A New Church For Thorncliffe

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A Church built for Newton-Chambers and Co.

This church is of early Gothic design of the French development.

It consists of nave, transepts (now used as vestries), and

tower at the west end, where is also the principal entrance. The

height to the wall-plate of nave is 20 feet, to ridge of nave 44

feet, and to ridge of transept 37 feet. The external dimensions

of the plan are 92 feet long, by 68 feet wide; across transept the

nave is 36 feet wide; the tower is 66 feet high, to which it is

intended at some future period to add a spire. There are galleries

over the vestries and lobby in tower; sittings are provided

for 333 persons on the ground floor, and in the galleries for 188,

making a total of 521. The entire cost was £2650.

The traceries of windows and moldings of doors are very bold

and simple. At the east end is a semi-octagonal apse, in which

placed the communion table. The church is built for Messrs,

Newton, Chambers, and Co., by whom the heating apparatus is

provided. Their apparatus is found to be very efficient, and is

very highly recommended by the architects. The walls are

2 feet thick, those of tower 2 ft. 6 in. In the tower are clock loft

and belfry loft. The walls are built of range work of native

stone; the shafts in doors, &c., are red Mansfield stone: the roof

is covered with slates with Delabole bands; the internal fittings

are picked red deal sized and varnished; the roof is boarded to

collars, in which are ventilators communicating with an exhausting

flue in tower.

The floor of the church is laid with Godwin's encaustic tiles.

The church occupies a site on the top of the hill. commanding

a very extensive prospect, and has been erected almost entirely

by the munificence of Messrs. Newton, Chambers, and Co., of the

Thorncliffe Iron Works, from the designs and under the superintendence

of Messrs. Wilson and Willcox, of London and Bath, architects.

The builders were, Mr. Robinson of Barnsley,

mason; Mr. Smith, of Hemingfield, carpenter and joiner; Messrs. Leadbeater

and Brown for the other trades. Mr. Sykes was Clerk of Works.

There have been very few extra.

Published 1866

I'm sorry but I am not very familiar with the Ecclesfield/Chapeltown area,

does this Church still exist ?

If so where about is it situated please.

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The church is still there. It is at the top of Loundside, Chapeltown although it is no longer used as a church. Oddly many of the Newton family are buried in a family vault which is at St John's Church next door to this one. Hope this helps.

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The church is still there. It is at the top of Loundside, Chapeltown although it is no longer used as a church. Oddly many of the Newton family are buried in a family vault which is at St John's Church next door to this one. Hope this helps.

Thank you Darryl,

without your help I don't think I would have found the place.

My thoughts were that the Church could have been demolished, it's nice to know it still stands.

Image courtesy of Google

Link to Flash Earth

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Hi

If I remember rightly the church was called Mount Pleasant.

Ignore me if you already knew that! :)

Elene

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Hi

If I remember rightly the church was called Mount Pleasant.

Ignore me if you already knew that! :)

Elene

All information is gratefully received,

thank you Elene.

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