Jump to content

Cemetery Road - Congregational Church


SteveHB
 Share

Recommended Posts

We do not appear to have this one ?

Cemetery Road - Congregational Church.

Opened in 1859

Closed / demolished ?

Cemetery Road Congregational Church is cruciform,

and is a good specimen of Gothic architecture.

It was opened in 1859, the funds having been

obtained mainly through the instrumentality of the Rev.

Brewin Grant, B.A., the Controversialist, now a minister of the

Church of England.

Mr. James, of London, was the architect,

and the edifice cost about £4,350.

It is still popularly known as " Brewin Grant's Church."

From: The Illustrated Guide to Sheffield

and The Surrounding District,

published 1879

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Some history of the building, as it was written :

The foundation stone of a new Congregational Church,

Cemetery Road, Sheffield, was laid on the 5th ult.; the new

building is intended for the congregation of the Rev. Brewin

Grant. The site is admirably adapted for the purpose, having

three frontages, the principal one being towards the Cemetery Road.

The new building will afford another instance among many

others by the same architect, of how much may be done in the

Gothic style of architecture at a very moderate cost. The

present contracts entered into by the committee do not amount

to 2000/., and it is expected that an additional 3OO/., will include

all extras in the way of fittings, lighting, &c.

The ground plan

consists of nave and transepts, the former terminating in a semi octagonal

apse containing the vestries. The total length of the

nave is 88 feet, width of nave 36 feet, and width across the

transepts 57 feet. On the ground floor provision will be made for

550 adults, who will be amply accommodated, the seats being wide

and commodious. An end gallery only will be erected at present,

holding about 100 people, but at a future time side galleries may

be erected, provision having been made for such an addition

when the total accommodation will be 900 sittings.

The fall in the ground from front to back is so great, that

there will be abundant height for extensive schoolrooms in the

basement, (with entrances from the street in the rear), which

are provided for in the contract.

Every convenience is provided in the way of staircases, and

ample means of ingress and egress, always an important matter

in places of public assembly.

The exterior of the building has been studied, as to obtain

a moat picturesque appearance from any of the many points

from which it will be viewed; and if, as anticipated, the committee

are enabled to carry out the views of the architect, by

erecting the ornamental turret at the junction of the nave and

transept, it is considered that when completed it will be one of

the moat successful, as well as moat economical churches in the

West Riding.

The elevation towards the Cemetery Road consists of the main

gable, which is divided by a central buttress into two bays, in

each of which will be a handsome three-light traceried window,

with an equilateral opening filled in with tracery above.

On each side of this gable will be open entrance porches, which will

greatly add to the beauty and originality of the design. The

side elevations will be relieved by the gables of the transepts, the

principal feature of which will be large circular windows, filled

In with light and elegant tracery. If the committee are enabled

to erect the turret, it will be built in the upper side of the transept

next the side street, and will be a great addition to the general design.

The whole is to be erected of various stone. found in the

neighbourhood of Sheffield, and the works are to be carried out

in a substantial manner.

The various contracts have been entered into by Sheffield

tradesmen, who will carry on the works under the superintendence

of the architect, Mr. Joseph James, of Furnival's-inn London.

Published, 1858.

1890

Link to picturesheffield

The site of, .. Flash Earth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do not appear to have this one ?

Cemetery Road - Congregational Church.

Opened in 1859

Closed / demolished ?

Cemetery Road Congregational Church is cruciform,

and is a good specimen of Gothic architecture.

It was opened in 1859, the funds having been

obtained mainly through the instrumentality of the Rev.

Brewin Grant, B.A., the Controversialist, now a minister of the

Church of England.

Mr. James, of London, was the architect,

and the edifice cost about £4,350.

It is still popularly known as " Brewin Grant's Church."

From: The Illustrated Guide to Sheffield

and The Surrounding District,

published 1879

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Some history of the building, as it was written :

The foundation stone of a new Congregational Church,

Cemetery Road, Sheffield, was laid on the 5th ult.; the new

building is intended for the congregation of the Rev. Brewin

Grant. The site is admirably adapted for the purpose, having

three frontages, the principal one being towards the Cemetery Road.

The new building will afford another instance among many

others by the same architect, of how much may be done in the

Gothic style of architecture at a very moderate cost. The

present contracts entered into by the committee do not amount

to 2000/., and it is expected that an additional 3OO/., will include

all extras in the way of fittings, lighting, &c.

The ground plan

consists of nave and transepts, the former terminating in a semi octagonal

apse containing the vestries. The total length of the

nave is 88 feet, width of nave 36 feet, and width across the

transepts 57 feet. On the ground floor provision will be made for

550 adults, who will be amply accommodated, the seats being wide

and commodious. An end gallery only will be erected at present,

holding about 100 people, but at a future time side galleries may

be erected, provision having been made for such an addition

when the total accommodation will be 900 sittings.

The fall in the ground from front to back is so great, that

there will be abundant height for extensive schoolrooms in the

basement, (with entrances from the street in the rear), which

are provided for in the contract.

Every convenience is provided in the way of staircases, and

ample means of ingress and egress, always an important matter

in places of public assembly.

The exterior of the building has been studied, as to obtain

a moat picturesque appearance from any of the many points

from which it will be viewed; and if, as anticipated, the committee

are enabled to carry out the views of the architect, by

erecting the ornamental turret at the junction of the nave and

transept, it is considered that when completed it will be one of

the moat successful, as well as moat economical churches in the

West Riding.

The elevation towards the Cemetery Road consists of the main

gable, which is divided by a central buttress into two bays, in

each of which will be a handsome three-light traceried window,

with an equilateral opening filled in with tracery above.

On each side of this gable will be open entrance porches, which will

greatly add to the beauty and originality of the design. The

side elevations will be relieved by the gables of the transepts, the

principal feature of which will be large circular windows, filled

In with light and elegant tracery. If the committee are enabled

to erect the turret, it will be built in the upper side of the transept

next the side street, and will be a great addition to the general design.

The whole is to be erected of various stone. found in the

neighbourhood of Sheffield, and the works are to be carried out

in a substantial manner.

The various contracts have been entered into by Sheffield

tradesmen, who will carry on the works under the superintendence

of the architect, Mr. Joseph James, of Furnival's-inn London.

Published, 1858.

1890

Link to picturesheffield

The site of, .. Flash Earth

The Church was demolished in the early 1960s to make way for the construction of a new office block for The Sheffield Twist Drill and Steel Company.

The Photograph was taken from the Office Block before it was also demolished in the early 1990s.

Southside

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest plain talker

the offices for "Dormer" (Sheffield twist drill )were here

http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Cemetery+Road,+Sheffield&aq=0&sll=53.363454,-1.440546&sspn=0.009271,0.018947&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Cemetery+Rd,+Sheffield,+United+Kingdom&ll=53.370515,-1.482532&spn=0.009218,0.018947&t=h&z=16&layer=c&cbll=53.370024,-1.482417&panoid=DTZUKnbbNEWv88wFPihlYw&cbp=12,358.99,,0,-0.31

just by the traffic lights, where the Green's Health Club is now.

This corner was where the "congs" church was situated.

(view from the other side

http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Cemetery+Road,+Sheffield&aq=0&sll=53.363454,-1.440546&sspn=0.009271,0.018947&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Cemetery+Rd,+Sheffield,+United+Kingdom&ll=53.370029,-1.482425&spn=0.009218,0.018947&t=h&z=16&layer=c&cbll=53.370586,-1.482585&panoid=HV8S7i8CtdMsj6u6TCL4SA&cbp=12,118.85,,0,8.77

Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to this National Archives link:   http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/c/F87625

 the "registers, minutes, members' roll and misc papers" are dated for the period 1853 to 1968.  

Although, here: 

http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Sheffield/Sheffield-CemeteryRoadCongChurch

It says the chapel was opened Oct. 12, 1859, by sermons from Rev. Dr. Raffles and James Parsons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a young boy living opposite the 'Dormer Drills' clock on Cemetery Road, I occasionally attended the nearby and now demolished, Congregational Church's Sunday School as well as a once weekly, early evening 'gathering' (only when the weather was too bad to play 'kick can' on Pearl Street and mainly with lads, who along with myself, were pupils at St Matthias C of E School).

My one undying memory of the place is the bullet holes, kindly left by the Luftwaffe on one of their raids during the Sheffield blitz, that had punched through some of the North facing windows and the corresponding holes evident on the internal walls. As you can imagine, being young these tangible reminders of hostilities were the stuff 'Boys Own' dreams were made of and when left unsupervised, our attempts to retrieve the embedded bullet remnants using pen knifes etc had little success.

Sad to say that's all I can remember about the place!

 

  

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...