Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Cyberman

The Camels Hump

Recommended Posts

Bit of a long shot this, but can any one remember the 'Camels Hump' which was at the bottom of Leighton Road and ran from the upsidedown houses down to Leighton Road itself.

It was a renowned sledging run which I was always too scared to try but used to enjoy watching others on.

The approximately 200m run had a large mound or hump about two thirds of the way down the very steep run. So severe was the speed of the run and the angle of the hump that most runs ended up with the sledge leaving the ground by about 3 feet and the person leaving the sledge by about the same distance.

Most runs ended at the point of landing with the inevitable crash and recoming together of person, sledge and ground. But for those (few) who actually survived the 'hump' the danger was far from over as the speed after landing was such that the end of the run nearly always finished with the sledge and occupant running out onto the bottom of Leighton Road itself.

Fortunately traffic was a lot lighter in those days.

Just out of interest I can remember a fatal car crash with a drunk driver crashing into a gas lamp on the bend just a bit further down Leighton road. I remember hearing the crash and running down the road with my mate to see what had happened. By the time we got there the body had already been covered up by a group of adults. The crash was so servere the driver had been thrown through the windscreen. No seat belts used in those days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bit of a long shot this, but can any one remember the 'Camels Hump' which was at the bottom of Leighton Road and ran from the upsidedown houses down to Leighton Road itself.

It was a renowned sledging run which I was always too scared to try but used to enjoy watching others on.

The approximately 200m run had a large mound or hump about two thirds of the way down the very steep run. So severe was the speed of the run and the angle of the hump that most runs ended up with the sledge leaving the ground by about 3 feet and the person leaving the sledge by about the same distance.

Most runs ended at the point of landing with the inevitable crash and recoming together of person, sledge and ground. But for those (few) who actually survived the 'hump' the danger was far from over as the speed after landing was such that the end of the run nearly always finished with the sledge and occupant running out onto the bottom of Leighton Road itself.

Fortunately traffic was a lot lighter in those days.

Just out of interest I can remember a fatal car crash with a drunk driver crashing into a gas lamp on the bend just a bit further down Leighton road. I remember hearing the crash and running down the road with my mate to see what had happened. By the time we got there the body had already been covered up by a group of adults. The crash was so servere the driver had been thrown through the windscreen. No seat belts used in those days.

I can't remember that one cyberman, - never heard of the camels hump on Leighton Road.

Not so sure about the fatal accident either, although as Leighton Road was built new in the 1950's I'm pretty sur that the gas lamp would have been electric. I can remember the Herdings as being one of the first places to use the yellow / orange sodium vapour electric street lights instead of electric street lamps fitted with ordinary electric light bulbs which lit up white.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't remember that one cyberman, - never heard of the camels hump on Leighton Road.

Not so sure about the fatal accident either, although as Leighton Road was built new in the 1950's I'm pretty sur that the gas lamp would have been electric. I can remember the Herdings as being one of the first places to use the yellow / orange sodium vapour electric street lights instead of electric street lamps fitted with ordinary electric light bulbs which lit up white.

Yes, sorry... 'Gaslamp' is just the term I still use to this day for all Lamp posts. Its just the word I have always used. But indeed the Lamp post would certainly have been of the electric variety. The point in time would have been somewhere around 1968. Also I remember the windscreen being smashed and the covered up body being out in front of the car. But the people who were on the scene before I arrived may have pulled the body out from the car and the driver may not have gone through the windscreen. That may well just be what I have perceived that had happened at the time and forged it to be fact in my head? How time can play tricks on you???

Thanks for your response... I did think it pretty remote that any one would remember such a localised thing as the Camels Hump but then again come winter and snow there always seemed to be plenty of takers to try their luck.

Regards, Cyberman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spent many a happy hour going over the "Camel's hump" during the snowy winters at Herdings.

We used to set off from the top of the hill on Raeburn road, somewhere between the last "upside down" house and the 28 bus shelter. It was a very steep drop at first, a bit like ski jumping, which gave you the speed to get over the hump. God help you if you hit a patch where the snow had worn away on the tarmac path that crossed the sledge run!

I don't remember the car accident though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, sorry... 'Gaslamp' is just the term I still use to this day for all Lamp posts. Its just the word I have always used. But indeed the Lamp post would certainly have been of the electric variety. The point in time would have been somewhere around 1968. Also I remember the windscreen being smashed and the covered up body being out in front of the car. But the people who were on the scene before I arrived may have pulled the body out from the car and the driver may not have gone through the windscreen. That may well just be what I have perceived that had happened at the time and forged it to be fact in my head? How time can play tricks on you???

Thanks for your response... I did think it pretty remote that any one would remember such a localised thing as the Camels Hump but then again come winter and snow there always seemed to be plenty of takers to try their luck.

Regards, Cyberman

No, there's no problem at all. I frequently refer to any old street lamp as a gas lamp, its a bit like calling a road roller a steam roller.

But I do have a bit of a fascination with street lights. I think the ones on Leighton Road fitted in the 1950's were the new yellow sodium lamps and not the white tungsten filament bulbs in which case the lamp standard would have been a cast concrete one rather than the older green painted cast iron ones.

But either way, concrete or iron are both very unforgiving if you are going to ram a car into it at high speed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spent many a happy hour going over the "Camel's hump" during the snowy winters at Herdings.

We used to set off from the top of the hill on Raeburn road, somewhere between the last "upside down" house and the 28 bus shelter. It was a very steep drop at first, a bit like ski jumping, which gave you the speed to get over the hump. God help you if you hit a patch where the snow had worn away on the tarmac path that crossed the sledge run!

I don't remember the car accident though.

Hey, Markbaby knows exactly where the "camels hump" is! B)

And now that he has described exactly where it is I know the very location. The top of it is only a few yards from my grandparents old house on Morland Road.

I never knew it was called the camels hump and I have never been down it in in snowy, icy weather.

You learn something new every day.

Isn't that area officially called something like Blackstock wood?

You may just get a glimpse of the top of the camels hump run in my brothers 8mm film "Joy Rider" as he motorbikes along Raeburn and Morland Roads at the beginning of the film.

It can be viewed on this site, along with other images of the area and local bits and pieces on this link

Joy Rider

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all, ...A RESULT wey-hey. Someone actually remembers the 'Camels Hump'. Thanks for your reply markbaby you've made my day. Had a look at the pictures that Daveh has posted of the area along with the film made in the same area and Im fairly sure thats the wrong end of the upside down houses. The Camels Hump was much further down Leighton Rd in line with the last upside down house at the other end of Raeburn Rd. Not sure wether the woods just below the Camels Hump was classed as Herdings woods or Blackstock woods? Have spent hours with my mates jumping over the stream and trying to climb up the very steep banks on the other side. Thanks again everyone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all, ...A RESULT wey-hey. Someone actually remembers the 'Camels Hump'. Thanks for your reply markbaby you've made my day. Had a look at the pictures that Daveh has posted of the area along with the film made in the same area and Im fairly sure thats the wrong end of the upside down houses. The Camels Hump was much further down Leighton Rd in line with the last upside down house at the other end of Raeburn Rd. Not sure wether the woods just below the Camels Hump was classed as Herdings woods or Blackstock woods? Have spent hours with my mates jumping over the stream and trying to climb up the very steep banks on the other side. Thanks again everyone.

Sorry Cyberman, there are 2 number 28 bus stops on Raeburn Road. From Markbaby's description I had assumed it was the one nearest to the road junction with Leighton Road, opposite the end of Morland Road.

But you seem to be describing the location of the other 28 bus stop which is actually the number 28 bus terminus where it turns round to head back. This stop is opposite the main entrance gate to Herdings Park.

If you do mean the 28 terminus stop then the location of the top of the run would be here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Cyberman, there are 2 number 28 bus stops on Raeburn Road. From Markbaby's description I had assumed it was the one nearest to the road junction with Leighton Road, opposite the end of Morland Road.

But you seem to be describing the location of the other 28 bus stop which is actually the number 28 bus terminus where it turns round to head back. This stop is opposite the main entrance gate to Herdings Park.

If you do mean the 28 terminus stop then the location of the top of the run would be here.

Showing your age there, Dave: bus route 28 to Herdings is long gone (it's the 47 and 48 these days), although to me it will always be the 28 terminus, as I had relatives who lived nearby on Raeburn Road. Showing my age as well, then lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Showing your age there, Dave: bus route 28 to Herdings is long gone (it's the 47 and 48 these days), although to me it will always be the 28 terminus, as I had relatives who lived nearby on Raeburn Road. Showing my age as well, then lol.

I was actually quoting both Markbaby and Cyberman when I first called it the 28 bus.

But you are right and I am showing my age,

The bus stops on Raeburn Road will always be the No. 28 bus stops just as the one at the top of the Leighton Road outside the old peoples care home will always be the No. 51 bus stop (terminus)

However if you are old enough that used to be the 105 bus stop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was actually quoting both Markbaby and Cyberman when I first called it the 28 bus.

But you are right and I am showing my age,

The bus stops on Raeburn Road will always be the No. 28 bus stops just as the one at the top of the Leighton Road outside the old peoples care home will always be the No. 51 bus stop (terminus)

However if you are old enough that used to be the 105 bus stop.

The Leighton Road terminus was also the terminus of the 30 for a time in the 60s and early 70s, but it will always be the 51 terminus to me, even though my first memories of the 51 are when it terminated at the Red Lion at Townend and despite the fact that the 51 no longer serves it.

Sorry, digressing away from the Camel's Hump again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Leighton Road terminus was also the terminus of the 30 for a time in the 60s and early 70s, but it will always be the 51 terminus to me, even though my first memories of the 51 are when it terminated at the Red Lion at Townend and despite the fact that the 51 no longer serves it.

Sorry, digressing away from the Camel's Hump again.

So we agree that, even though it is not true today, the bus stops at Herdings are still known to us as the 51 stop (Leighton terminus) and the 28 stop (Raeburn terminus)

Anyway, I find this "camels hump" business fascinating as it is in area I have known very well for around 50 years and yet I had never heard of it until Cyberman made the initial post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

However if you are old enough that used to be the 105 bus stop.

Sorry Dave, It was the 101, Malin Bridge to Herdings that stopped at the terminus outside the Castelayn Care Home

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Dave, It was the 101, Malin Bridge to Herdings that stopped at the terminus outside the Castelayn Care Home

Sorry Mark, my mistake.

But it's one of those mistakes I keep making over and over for no apparent reason and I don't know why I am doing it. :angry:

I must have used a 105 bus at some point, - what route did it run?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Dave, It was the 101, Malin Bridge to Herdings that stopped at the terminus outside the Castelayn Care Home

The 101 was the first service to run to Leighton Road terminus, extended from Gleadless Townend some time in the 1950s. The 101 (and 102) were withdrawn in the mid 60s and replaced by the 51 (City to Lodge Moor) being extended to Gleadless Townend and the 30 and 105 running to Herdings, with the 30 being the main service and the 105 being peak hours/early mornings only. The 30 was withdrawn in the early 1970s when the 51 was extended to Leighton Road, the 105 lingering (later renumbered 72) for some time.

I can't be more precise with the dates at the moment, as I don't have time to refer to my old timetables.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 101 was the first service to run to Leighton Road terminus, extended from Gleadless Townend some time in the 1950s. The 101 (and 102) were withdrawn in the mid 60s and replaced by the 51 (City to Lodge Moor) being extended to Gleadless Townend and the 30 and 105 running to Herdings, with the 30 being the main service and the 105 being peak hours/early mornings only. The 30 was withdrawn in the early 1970s when the 51 was extended to Leighton Road, the 105 lingering (later renumbered 72) for some time.

I can't be more precise with the dates at the moment, as I don't have time to refer to my old timetables.

So I am not going mad then.

I can clearly remember travelling to / from Herdings on the 105, and the 30 as it happens.

In fact all those bus numbers sound familiar and I must have used them all at some time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all, yes I too use to use the 28 and 51 buses... i sometimes used the 64 Charnock from town and got off at townend then walked through 'the Gardens' to the top of Leighton road. 'The Gardens' were not peoples actual back gardens but the allotments at the back of them. This was a well known shortcut to save having to walk up the steep hill to the cutlers arms and then round past the 51 terminus bus stop. Does anyone remember 'The Gardens' shortcut and does anyone know if it still exists? It use to have a small hut of a shop at the townend entrance to the allotments which used to sell a few flowers and compost and other gardening stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all, yes I too use to use the 28 and 51 buses... i sometimes used the 64 Charnock from town and got off at townend then walked through 'the Gardens' to the top of Leighton road. 'The Gardens' were not peoples actual back gardens but the allotments at the back of them. This was a well known shortcut to save having to walk up the steep hill to the cutlers arms and then round past the 51 terminus bus stop. Does anyone remember 'The Gardens' shortcut and does anyone know if it still exists? It use to have a small hut of a shop at the townend entrance to the allotments which used to sell a few flowers and compost and other gardening stuff.

We know it well Cyberman,

In fact it has been mentioned, and photographed in this topic linked below

Those Gleadless Pictures

The relevant pictures of the allotment footpath is around post number 18 and 19 or so, but as you seem to be a bit of a Herdings lad I am sure you will want to read all of it (if you have not done so already) and possibly contribute to it.

The garden hut is still there, it is one of the cheapest sources of paraffin in the area but I think you have to be an allotment holder to get it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep thats the one. Having now read up on the Gleadless/Herdings article (which was very interesting) I've come to the conclusion that Markbaby probably lived very close to an arch enemy of mine who went by the name of Andrew Schoepak (forgive the spelling of the sir name, i've no idea how its actually spelt as he was from Poland or somewhere like that). But from the pictures of Markbaby's house, I think he lived on the same row and just wondered if he, or indeed anyone else had heard of him?

On another related note. Markbaby did you use to go to the fair at the side of the Norton water tower in the summer holidays? I went there every summer without fail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all, i've come accross this on youtube and at (8.12) there is one quick shot of an old 28 bus going up Leighton Rd.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep thats the one. Having now read up on the Gleadless/Herdings article (which was very interesting) I've come to the conclusion that Markbaby probably lived very close to an arch enemy of mine who went by the name of Andrew Schoepak (forgive the spelling of the sir name, i've no idea how its actually spelt as he was from Poland or somewhere like that). But from the pictures of Markbaby's house, I think he lived on the same row and just wondered if he, or indeed anyone else had heard of him?

On another related note. Markbaby did you use to go to the fair at the side of the Norton water tower in the summer holidays? I went there every summer without fail.

I knew a Christine Schoepak that lived very near Markbaby, had a friend called Pauline Noone.

Anyway, I thought the only arch enemy of Cybermen was Dr. Who. lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi DaveH, actually the Darleks are my enemy as well as the Dr... oh and Andrew Shoepak of course. Perhaps he had a sister, I don't know and I havn't heard of the other girl either. Only use to come over that end to hunt down Andrew. She must have been some relation to Andrew though seeing as Shoepak is not the most common name in the Herdings area. Oh and its Cyberman not Cybermen as there is only one of me now. Im a dying breed as you can tell from my picture. Im an original mkI Cyberman and very old and rusty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi DaveH, actually the Darleks are my enemy as well as the Dr... oh and Andrew Shoepak of course. Perhaps he had a sister, I don't know and I havn't heard of the other girl either. Only use to come over that end to hunt down Andrew. She must have been some relation to Andrew though seeing as Shoepak is not the most common name in the Herdings area. Oh and its Cyberman not Cybermen as there is only one of me now. Im a dying breed as you can tell from my picture. Im an original mkI Cyberman and very old and rusty.

So why was Andrew so bad?

Did he beat you on a sledge race down over the camels hump or something?

The Schoepaks did indeed live near Markbaby. My knowledge of them is from the late 1960's and early 1970's. The ones we are talking of are of course British born but the family is from Poland, having come here after the German invasion of Poland in 1939.

So, - is Cyberman a Herdings lad then? or not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Difficult one to answer that... 'partly' would be the most accurate answer. Moved around alot while young. Norfolk Park, Sothall, Herdings, Millhouses... you name it and chances are I've spent some time there.

Nothing made Andrew particularly bad. It's just that we crossed swords once and it became a bit of a running fued. We seemed to be very closely matched when it came to strength and stubborness.

Now you come to mention it, I think I can remember that girl Paulines brother, yea, they called him 'Peter' and he always used to wake up in the morning feeling fine and kept going on about something special that was on his mind?

Regards, Cyberman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×