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Where In Sheffield Is It?

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When the tram tracks were re-laid on the Moor in 1909 the service was maintained by laying temporary tracks on the surface outside of the existing tracks. The photos in the Gandy book show bits of curved track used to facilitate the transitions from centre to outer tracks as work progressed.

My money's on somewhere near South Street/The Moor.

HD

Some more dangly thingies (in the background) on either side of the Moor,

also what appears to be a couple of bobbies.

picturesheffield

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Some more dangly thingies (in the background) on either side of the Moor,

also what appears to be a couple of bobbies.

picturesheffield

The advert on the corner of the shop on the left appears to include "shirts".

Before I had my eyesight corrected by cataract surgery I was very very shortsighted and it gave me a weird ability to look at old photo's very closely and after a while I could resolve the wording on tiny street nameplates. People used to bring me photos and I rarely got it wrong. I also could read the tiny writing making up what appeared to be plain lines on cheques & banknotes. Alas since the surgery I've lost that ability but I much prefer the way i am now. lol

HD

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The advert on the corner of the shop on the left appears to include "shirts".

Before I had my eyesight corrected by cataract surgery I was very very shortsighted and it gave me a weird ability to look at old photo's very closely and after a while I could resolve the wording on tiny street nameplates. People used to bring me photos and I rarely got it wrong. I also could read the tiny writing making up what appeared to be plain lines on cheques & banknotes. Alas since the surgery I've lost that ability but I much prefer the way i am now. lol

HD

I would not doubt that 'Paul Silvester Wainwright'Outfitters @ 170-174, South Street, Moor.

sold shirts hilldweller, I bet they also sold shorts as did 'Ye Woodman Public House'

Ask the copper in the photo, he should know lol

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I would not doubt that 'Paul Silvester Wainwright'Outfitters @ 170-174, South Street, Moor.

sold shirts hilldweller, I bet they also sold shorts as did 'Ye Woodman Public House'

Ask the copper in the photo, he should know lol

I'd like to bet the gent's outfitters didn't sell many shorts in those days, long johns perhaps but the only shorts would be sold to ankle-biters and those a little bit older.

Now the pub would certainly sell shorts unless it was a beerhouse in those days. I would ask the copper but he would be about 140 years old now and not very vocal.

What a pity that no-one thought to make a full photographic record of the city centre before that nasty Austrian house painter caused mayhem & destruction in 1940. Some of the buildings in the photo look very distinctive.

I noticed many years ago that the Library had a collection of 1950/60's high res photos of most Sheffield streets.

HD

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I agree with you hilldweller, it looks more like a large shop than a pub or a theatre.

Most shops had these canvas pull down blinds at the time and it also looks like

large glass windws. And what is it advertising up top of the building? What do those

letters say? There was a building that used to have BOVRIL above it, but I can't remember

where that was.

There was a building with a BOVRIL sign on it at the top of Fargate,

link to picturesheffield

looks to be the Fleur de Lys P.H ?

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The terrace houses look very much like the ones where my Grand parents lived Standon Road / Woodgrove road Wincobank.

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The Little Star fish and chip shop reminds me of one we used to go to

in the very early 60s . I can't remember if it was on Robert Street or

Edith Street but I know a school friend of mine lived there.

The name was Priestley in about 1960/1. Has anyone got access to

a directory of that year?

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Where are the Unidentified Steps ?

I know the exact location of the old steps (they no longer exist) shown in the picturesheffield image,

can any SH member/s confirm my find ?

We need an exact location, so the name of the area is not good enough.

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Where are the Unidentified Steps ?

I know the exact location of the old steps (they no longer exist) shown in the picturesheffield image,

can any SH member/s confirm my find ?

We need an exact location, so the name of the area is not good enough.

If my memory serves me these steps were at the junction of Granville Hill and Granville Street just above the workshops of British Relay Wireless on Granville Street.

HD

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If my memory serves me these steps were at the junction of Granville Hill and Granville Street just above the workshops of British Relay Wireless on Granville Street.

HD

Well hilldweller, I don't think we could get a more exact answer than yours.

Well Done !!

The potographer would have been stood on Granville Hill

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Well hilldweller, I don't think we could get a more exact answer than yours.

Well Done !!

The potographer would have been stood on Granville Hill

Link to 1950's OS map # 04

Flash Earth + marks the spot

And a section taken from a photo posted on here by 'mickjj'

Link to Micks post

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Well hilldweller, I don't think we could get a more exact answer than yours.

Well Done !!

The potographer would have been stood on Granville Hill

Thank-you SteveHB, I've been told that I've got a pornographic sorry photographic memory.

I well remember those steps as I used to visit a little surplus dealer just around the corner on Granville Street to buy cheap early surplus transistors, the discrete devices not the radios. I used to to watch the BRW technicians chucking the TV's about when they came in for repair. If your telly had a pristine case when it went in for repair, it didn't when you got it back !

The steps cut off a considerable part of the corner with a retaining wall until the actual road junction.

HD

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I used to visit a little surplus dealer just around the corner on Granville Street to buy cheap early surplus transistors, the discrete devices not the radios.

HD

The early transfer - resisitors (transistors) were germanium pnp types.

As Walter Brattain said to John Bardeen in the Bell Laboratories in 1947

"Look at that John, - the output from that germanium contact is greater than the input!

I think we should let Walter Shockley know about this,

I think we could be on to something big here"

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The early transfer - resisitors (transistors) were germanium pnp types.

As Walter Brattain said to John Bardeen in the Bell Laboratories in 1947

"Look at that John, - the output from that germanium contact is greater than the input!

I think we should let Walter Shockley know about this,

I think we could be on to something big here"

I'm just a bit older than the first transistor and the ones I bought there in about 1960 would indeed be germanium PNP contact types. If you scraped the black paint off the glass encapsulated Mullard ones you could make a photo transistor. I couldn't afford the Mullard ones at about £2-4-11d 'so I bought the Red Spot (af) and Green Spot (rf) surplus ones which I think came from the U.S. for about 3 shillings each. They all seemed to work but the characteristics were very variable. Still good enough for a little lad to play with and a lot safer than the valve stuff I usually tinkered with.

HD

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The early transfer - resisitors (transistors) were germanium pnp types.

As Walter Brattain said to John Bardeen in the Bell Laboratories in 1947

"Look at that John, - the output from that germanium contact is greater than the input!
I think we should let Walter Shockley know about this,
I think we could be on to something big here"

Do you think that John said to Walter, "Hey Walter, do you know that in 64 years they will be putting almost a billion of these little critters on a single die and selling them in their millions to every Tom, wee pipe and Harriet ?"

Intel Sandybridge Processor - 995,000,000 transistor elements, in the shops now but don't buy one until they've sorted out the motherboard glitch.

HD

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If you scraped the black paint off the glass encapsulated Mullard ones you could make a photo transistor.

HD

I seem to remember doing the same thing hilldweller,

Would that have been the OC 71 transistor?

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Do you think that John said to Walter, "Hey Walter, do you know that in 64 years they will be putting almost a billion of these little critters on a single die and selling them in their millions to every Tom, Dick and Harriet ?"

Intel Sandybridge Processor - 995,000,000 transistor elements, in the shops now but don't buy one until they've sorted out the motherboard glitch.

HD

I don't think so,

I was trying to indicate in the (fictional) conversation between the inventors that great thing often come from very humble beginnings.

But just how great an invention it was I don't think even they could have imagined.

Modern electronics owes a lot to the work of Bratten and Shockley, - but how many people have ever even heard of them! :(

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