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Plague !


RichardB
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There was a channel four documentary ( I see a lot of them) about how some victims of the plague from Eyam got the plague and survived and some who lived among the victims who died, burrying them after looking after them in some cases, but never ever caught the plague. <br><br>The reason was all down to the Black Death. Apparently the survivors of that had passed on their relatives two forms of genes which provides the protection needed to live. Tests on the desendents of Eyam, showed that those who were related to the persons who suffered from the plague had one form of the protection gene inherited from one of their parents. And those who never got the plague inherited both, one from each parent. <br><br>The reason why the two genes worked wasn't because it was the same illness as the Black Death, but it imployed the same way of attacking the body as it. The germ once in the body would go to the area were White Cells - the body's defence system - are made and destroy it. It did this by getting inside a White Cell.&nbsp;&nbsp;So the person would die of any number of illness. In fact the AIDS virus uses the same system. And on the documentary one *** man in the USA, whose friends were all dying of AIDS, couldn't work out why he wasn't dead. He persuaded his doctor to test him and ask why. It turns out he was descended from two parents with the Black Death protection genes. These two genes ensure that all three viruses cannot get inside the White Cell, thus giving complete protection against any virus using this method. Sadly the Black Death never got into places like Africia, so there are no protection genes in its native population, thus explaining why AIDS has had a much worse effect there than in European countries.

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There was a channel four documentary ( I see a lot of them) about how some victims of the plague from Eyam got the plague and survived and some who lived among the victims who died, burrying them after looking after them in some cases, but never ever caught the plague.

The reason was all down to the Black Death. Apparently the survivors of that had passed on their relatives two forms of genes which provides the protection needed to live. Tests on the desendents of Eyam, showed that those who were related to the persons who suffered from the plague had one form of the protection gene inherited from one of their parents. And those who never got the plague inherited both, one from each parent.

The reason why the two genes worked wasn't because it was the same illness as the Black Death, but it imployed the same way of attacking the body as it. The germ once in the body would go to the area were White Cells - the body's defence system - are made and destroy it. It did this by getting inside a White Cell. So the person would die of any number of illness. In fact the AIDS virus uses the same system. And on the documentary one gay man in the USA, whose friends were all dying of AIDS, couldn't work out why he wasn't dead. He persuaded his doctor to test him and ask why. It turns out he was descended from two parents with the Black Death protection genes. These two genes ensure that all three viruses cannot get inside the White Cell, thus giving complete protection against any virus using this method. Sadly the Black Death never got into places like Africia, so there are no protection genes in its native population, thus explaining why AIDS has had a much worse effect there than in European countries.

If you go to Eyam in Derbyshire there is a plague museum.

It is one house big and costs about 50p to go in but has some excellent displays and histories of the Eyam plague.

However, the final section of the museum more or less says exactly what History Dude is saying here.

In fact in the 1980's descendants of people who survived and apparently had immunity to the Eyam plague were traced in order to study how this "immunity" to a killer disease worked with a view to developing methods of dealing with the HIV virus and AIDS.

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A few years since I have been to Eyam but well worth a visit.

Sounds daft but , apart from passing through Eyam quite early one morning whilst out walking, I don't think I've been since I was a child.

Must make a point of going.

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Sounds daft but , apart from passing through Eyam quite early one morning whilst out walking, I don't think I've been since I was a child.

Must make a point of going.

How many of us have places we say the same about? One day I must make a list and make an effort to tick them off as I go!

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Instructions for the containment and disinfection of the Plague!

The Newes, July 6th 1665

4 pages

I remember reading in one of the books on the history of Sheffield that at the time of the Eyam plague Sheffield council 9such as it would have been at the time) paid for a sentry box to be placed on the road into the town from Derbyshire / Eyam (Abbeydale and Ecclesall Roads then) and for it to be manned by an armed sentry who was to turn away from the town and refuse entry to anyone entering from Eyam to prevent them bringing the plague into the town.

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I remember reading in one of the books on the history of Sheffield that at the time of the Eyam plague Sheffield council 9such as it would have been at the time) paid for a sentry box to be placed on the road into the town from Derbyshire / Eyam (Abbeydale and Ecclesall Roads then) and for it to be manned by an armed sentry who was to turn away from the town and refuse entry to anyone entering from Eyam to prevent them bringing the plague into the town.

In the Porter Valley there was a spring called Fulwood Spa which had supposed healing properties, and a constable was employed to prevent anyone from Eyam accessingt he waters.

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In the Porter Valley there was a spring called Fulwood Spa which had supposed healing properties, and a constable was employed to prevent anyone from Eyam accessingt he waters.

Without finding the exact quote in a book Bayleaf that is probably what I am thinking of. It was certainly something on those lines.

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A few years since I have been to Eyam but well worth a visit.

plus there is a new car park behind the old one and its.....................FREE! B)

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plus there is a new car park behind the old one and its.....................FREE! B)

I seem to remember last time I went the car park was FREE, quite SMALL but EMPTY so there was plenty of space to park.

I think it only cost 30p to visit the plague museum.

It is a small museum, being built into just one detached house, but it contained plenty of exhibits and was certainly well worth 30p

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I seem to remember last time I went the car park was FREE, quite SMALL but EMPTY so there was plenty of space to park.

I think it only cost 30p to visit the plague museum.

It is a small museum, being built into just one detached house, but it contained plenty of exhibits and was certainly well worth 30p

I think this car park has only been open a year or two most,

this was took last year, at the rear of the new car park, just before it chucked it down

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In the Porter Valley there was a spring called Fulwood Spa which had supposed healing properties, and a constable was employed to prevent anyone from Eyam accessingt he waters.

The dread of this infectious disease, as manifested in the case of this woman, and in the institution of keeping watch in the approximate villages, is not marvellous; for in the accounts of the constables of Sheffield, there is the following item :-

"Charges about keeping people from Fullwood Spring (ten miles from Eyam) at the time the plague was at Eyam".

Fuel was an article which the inhabitants had to encounter great difficulties in obtaining; those who fetched it from the coal-pits had to make circuitous routes, and represent themselves as coming from other places. One man on his journey unthinkingly let it slip that he came from Eyam on which he was greatly abused and driven back with his horses unladen.

http://books.google....effield&f=false

The full book : The history and antiquities of Eyam; with a minute account of The Great Plague which desolated that village in the year 1666.

By William Wood (of Eyam)

1859

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Miftaken

There are, I am told, in the poffeffion of a gentleman who lives near Eyam ...

http://books.google....0plague&f=false

Philological Society (1790)

Letter written by Rev. Mr. William Mompesson to his children George and Elizabeth, August 1666.

This one letter of three (and the only one I've found so far).

http://books.google....0plague&f=false

Letter is on page 63 - powerful and moving reading.

(This from The European Magazine and London Review - - Philological Society of London - 1793)

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