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Jervis Lum


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Before leaving the park the stream runs into this grid taking it into an underground culvert again

Notice that those new and now quite substantial (not lightweight prefabricated) buildings on the Beeches development off Beeches road are directly on top of the course of the now subterrainian stream

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So here ends my photographic tour of the Jervis Lum as from this point the course of the stream is hidden by housing as we approach town making picture taking along the route difficult.

From here the underground stream continues to run down the western side of Norfolk Park to near its entrance on Norfolk Park Road which it then flows under.

After that it is under land hidden by works premises, although Google Earth shows what may be another small pond or pool within this complex.

It would then flow out, more than likely under Farm Road (unadopted), down under the Silver Blades car park, under Queens Road and finally into the River Sheaf at some point near Sheaf Gardens.

Producing this photographic tour made for a very pleasant Sunday morning walk, better than staying in sat in front of a computer and, Stuart0742 please note, - none of this is Google Street "armchair photography", Google can't get their vans down narrow little valleys and across wet fields!

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Stuart0742

So here ends my photographic tour of the Jervis Lum as from this point the course of the stream is hidden by housing as we approach town making picture taking along the route difficult.

From here the underground stream continues to run down the western side of Norfolk Park to near its entrance on Norfolk Park Road which it then flows under.

After that it is under land hidden by works premises, although Google Earth shows what may be another small pond or pool within this complex.

It would then flow out, more than likely under Farm Road (unadopted), down under the Silver Blades car park, under Queens Road and finally into the River Sheaf at some point near Sheaf Gardens.

Producing this photographic tour made for a very pleasant Sunday morning walk, better than staying in sat in front of a computer and, Stuart0742 please note, - none of this is Google Street "armchair photography", Google can't get their vans down narrow little valleys and across wet fields!

That comes next "Google Path View" lol

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That comes next "Google Path View" lol

Followed by Google field, Gooogle stream and Google underground culvert lol

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Guest Falls

The housing on what is now Arbourthorne road does start at an unfeasibly high number, two-hundred and something, IIRC, (my parents' home, on AR was in the upper five-hundreds), and, yes, on old maps St Aidens Road was originally "Arbourthorne Road" too. (and the two ends of the road do align)

I suspect it was less to do with the supposed "snobbery", than the practicalities of joining the two "blind" ends of the road up through the lumb, and the confusion that would be caused by having two very separate roads with the same name

The name was changed because mail was being misdirected. Mail intended for the houses at the City Road end was being sent to the other end of Arbourthorne Road and vice versa. At the same time (late 1940's -early 1950's), the City had begun planning the Norfolk Park development and had already decide that the two parts of Arbourthorne Road would never be directly connected.

There has been qute a bit of discussion about wet ground but nobody has mention fires or to be more accurate, spotaneous combustion. In really hot weather, you could occasionally smoke rising from the hillside. The fire brigade would make periodic visits to make sure it wasnt too serious. This would be in the general area where Park Grange Road and St Adians Road now meet. Thats not too far way from Deep Pits and we all know where the area got its name from.

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The name was changed because mail was being misdirected. Mail intended for the houses at the City Road end was being sent to the other end of Arbourthorne Road and vice versa. At the same time (late 1940's -early 1950's), the City had begun planning the Norfolk Park development and had already decide that the two parts of Arbourthorne Road would never be directly connected.

There has been qute a bit of discussion about wet ground but nobody has mention fires or to be more accurate, spotaneous combustion. In really hot weather, you could occasionally smoke rising from the hillside. The fire brigade would make periodic visits to make sure it wasnt too serious. This would be in the general area where Park Grange Road and St Adians Road now meet. Thats not too far way from Deep Pits and we all know where the area got its name from.

The area you refer to at the junction of Park Grange Road and St. Aidens road which is currently levelled and has a football pitch on it was always known to us as "the smouldering tip" because of the phenomena that you have described which occured there,

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Guest skeets

there are wartime prefabs still in existence on the street behind my friend's flat at Stannington, and, yes they are built onto the hillside with a small foundation of brick, higher at the "downhill" side than at the other.

My aunt lived in a prefab at Intake before moving to Hyde Park, and my main memories are of the floor "bouncing" as it was being walked across, and the taps in the bathroom being quite weird (they weren't attached to the bath, they came out of the wall over the bath) yes it was cold in he house. (my finnegan house, although "prefab" in construction, was excellent in winter, as it had so much insulation between the walls. very warm, and quite economical to heat)

the shale/ shingle-y stuff under your topsoil would have probably been to do with the mine workings in the area (there were pits from Elm Tree Pit at Manor Top, right down the hill)

HI Plain talker l was directed in 1946 to work on the erection of prefabs in the Park district and those in Dore village, and the foundations were adequate for that type of building, its based on the calculation of the total wieght of the building to be built, as for damp ground an adequate damp course takes care of that same as any building,and should be a minimum of 16 centimetres above the surrounding ground.as for floor bounce thats coursed by the joists or packings drying out,to say they were supposed to have a life span of 20yrs they did well Skeets

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Guest carlie167

Here is my little contribution, a couple of winter shots of Jervis Lum.

They were taken in 1978 with a little instamatic camera, so are not that clear but perhaps someone could "tweak" them a bit.

However, I still thought they were worth posting, hope you like them. :mellow:

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SteveHB

The bronze plaques on the pedestrian bridge over The Lum were designed by children from Norfolk Community Primary school, and it is sad to say they were all stolen (some 42 in total) in early March. :angry:

I'm quoting part of my own post #5 here from 2007..

As the bronze plaques that were stolen from Lum Bridge have recently been replaced

with plaques made of steel,

not a bad idea after all, as they will most likely end up as paint and marker boards.

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I'm quoting part of my own post #5 here from 2007..

As the bronze plaques that were stolen from Lum Bridge have recently been replaced

with plaques made of steel,

not a bad idea after all, as they will most likely end up as paint and marker boards.

I get the impression that if they are going to steal bronze plaques they are just as likely to try to steal the steel ones given the current economic hardships and the high price of scrap metal.

Lets hope these plaques remain in place for considerably longer than the original bronze ones did.

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SteveHB

I get the impression that if they are going to steal bronze plaques they are just as likely to try to steal the steel ones given the current economic hardships and the high price of scrap metal.

Lets hope these plaques remain in place for considerably longer than the original bronze ones did.

It's a good job we don't all live in 'Cast Iron houses'

then Dave,

In'it

he he he he

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Guest plain talker

A map showing my proposed route of the Jervis Lum stream, including the underground sections

Now that route is very interesting to me, as we had a natural stream run through the garden of my house on Arbourthorne, and the position of my old house corresponds quite closely to that route. wow! :D

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Now that route is very interesting to me, as we had a natural stream run through the garden of my house on Arbourthorne, and the position of my old house corresponds quite closely to that route. wow! :D

I made the deductions about the underground sections of the stream from the known locations of the exposed sections and the natural contour of the land, or the "lie of the land" on the surface, given that Isaac Newton was correct about gravity and that water can only flow down the hill.

I am fairly sure this is the most probable path of the Jervis Lum but of course I cannot say how deep underground the stream is at various points, how it is diverted by underground geology (pervious and impervious rocks, sedimentary layers and seams, old mine workings for example) and I also don't know the full extent of the undeground channeling and culverting put in by the council works department as this is quite apparent at the points where the stream appears and disappears along its course.

I would like to investigate this further but water divining is not one of my skills, - anyone want to walk the course with a couple of old twigs?

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dunsbyowl1867

Yes I think that is a much better interpretation than just a 'pool'; such areas would remain woodland for the simple reason that it was impractical to do anything with them - except perhaps in medieval times to use them for pannage and a source of domestic fuel. Most are too small and awkward to be coppiced and water would tend to collect in the bottoms even if there were not a stream or spring present.

Must have a look at that book.

Not that it adds anything but - whilst flicking through Addy's 'Glossary' of Sheffield Words.(1888) he gives this definition

LUMS

" A man at Dore spoke of what he called 'wood bottoms" growing shrubs and trees and not fit for mowing as 'Lums'.

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Not that it adds anything but - whilst flicking through Addy's 'Glossary' of Sheffield Words.(1888) he gives this definition

LUMS

" A man at Dore spoke of what he called 'wood bottoms" growing shrubs and trees and not fit for mowing as 'Lums'.

There are a fair scattering of lum(B)s around Sheffield on the first OS maps. All seem to be small wooded ravines with wet bottoms. :)

Odd software...converts lower case b in parentheses to uppercase and then substitutes a 'cool' smiley :P

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There are a fair scattering of lum(B)s around Sheffield on the first OS maps. All seem to be small wooded ravines with wet bottoms. :)

Odd software...converts lower case b in parentheses to uppercase and then substitutes a 'cool' smiley :P

There is a list of lumbs and the derivation of the word in the earlier posts in this thread, see posts around #15 to #20 ish. Gramps actually made several contributions to this.

The oddness of the software is due to the coding used for smileys.

Notice that when you insert a smiley it goes in as a code which frequently starts with a left bracket, ( The software can sometimes interpret this bracket as a smiley depending on what follows it. To avoid the problem I frequently use { or [ from the key to the right of the letter P instead of ( which is a shifted 9 to avoid the problem altogether.

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There is a list of lumbs and the derivation of the word in the earlier posts in this thread, see posts around #15 to #20 ish. Gramps actually made several contributions to this.

Yes I know....I'm Gramps BTW lol I was just having a little joke with Dunsbyowl.

Thank you for the keyboard instruction, I have been using a computer keyboard since 1990 although I suppose I must appear to be quite a dunce at times.

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Why not just untick the 'Enable emoticons' box

to disable them

Steve - I wasn't complaining...just commenting on the inconsistency of the coding. I'd expect 'cool. to be represented by :cool: rather than an uppercase B and a half parenthesis in modern board software. I dunno what codepage the software uses for text but I wouldn't expect it to convert a lowercase b to an uppercase one anyway. :rolleyes: In my ASCII messaging days 'cool' was B-) [ie with a hyphen]

Now I'm aware of it there is no problem ;-)

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Why not just untick the 'Enable emoticons' box

to disable them

So where did you get that animated, dancing "cool" emoticon from?

I can't find it on the screen when doing a post.

Are there more of these things available than is visually obvious on the post screen?

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