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Found 8,472 results

  1. Here is some information about the Sheffield Club which is taken from a Ph.D thesis submitted by Alan P White to the University of Leeds, Department of Social Policy and Sociology in March 1990. The first mention of the Club in the local press occurs in July 1843 when the following advertisement appeared: "Wanted to Rent. For a term of years in a central part of the town, premises suitable for the SHEFFIELD CLUB - Rent and other particulars to be communicated by letter to Mr. Wake. In December of the same year another advertisement appeared asking for a "middle aged married man" to act as steward.' The Club opened in January 1844 in a house in Norfolk Street which had been taken on a ten year lease at a rental of £60 p.a. At the 50th anniversary dinner, held on the 1 January 1894, the only surviving original member (Sir Henry Edmund Watson ) said: "Before the present club was formed there had been a small club of professional men, merchants, and others, who meet from time to time for lunch, smoke and joke. A desire, however, arose among some of the younger generation for rather more extended accommodation. Seven daring spirits then agreed to form the present club and were delighted to find the elder gentlemen of the old club ready to join them." Unfortunately Watson does not go on to say who the seven were, or what the old club was. However, an entry in the minutes for 25 October 1847 may cast some light on the former. It shows that £118.11s.7d had been repayed to William Wake, Benjamin Huntsman, William Watson and Richard Stuart in respect of £100 which they had lent the Club in 1843. A solicitor, coal owner, bank director and iron and brass founder, the mix was typical of Club membership throughout the period of this study. Of these four Richard Stuart is the odd man out, as his membership of the Club seems to have been tenuous. On the 22nd February 1844 the minutes of the general committee record that some discussion took place about "parties now wishing to back out" from paying their subscription money. On the 29 June the problem came up again, and this time the men were named; they were "Mr.Vickers" (possibly Edward Vickers, corn and flour dealer, and father of a later member T E Vickers), Thomas Branson (a solicitor and still a member in 1849), Alfred Sorby and Stuart himself. Vickers and Sorby seem to have resigned whilst Stuart stayed long enough to collect his repayment in October 1847 and left in the December of the following year. In 1851 the club consisted of Two Billiards Rooms, a Reading Room, a Smoke Room, a Coffee Room, a Dining Room and sleeping accommodation for the steward (there was presumably a kitchen somewhere although this is not mentioned). Apart from the steward and his wife - the cook - there were also a billiard marker, two 'boys' and a Housekeeper. At this time the steward and his wife were being paid £60 p.a. "on condition that they be subject to leave at a minutes notice - and that their children be not allowed to be in the Club at all." By 1855 their wages had been increased to £71 p.a. and the staff had grown to two Waiters ( £11.10s. p.a.), two Markers ( £7.10.s p.a.), and two Maid Servants (£9 p.a.). The total wage bill for the year 1855-6 given in the accounts of the Sheffield Club is £127. In keeping with the London Clubs on which it was modelled, the Club had a Committee of Management which handled its day to day affairs. This in turn was divided into a Wine Committee, a House Committee, a Billiard Committee and a number of scrutineers for the election of new members. The committee consisted of twelve members, three of whom were to retire - with the possibility of re-election - at the end of each year. The report which the committee delivered to the first annual general meeting on the 5th January 1845 illustrated the great advantage to be gained by having at least one member of the Club from the various trades from which it would need to buy supplies. Expressing their aim of exercising "the strictest Economy consistent with the comfort of the Members and respectability of the Establishment"' they went on to thank the members who had provided goods on "liberal terms"; as the 'members' included Rodgers & Sons (Cutlery Manufacturers) it seems reasonable to assume that the committee was buying cutlery and furniture as well as food and drink. At first the Club provided only one meal a day - a 'Table d'Hote' of meat, vegetables and cheese - at 2.00pm each day (except Sunday) at a cost of 1/6d. It continued through to December 1851 when it was discontinued in favour of a more flexible arrangement with a meal of meat, soup and vegetables being available between 2.00pm and 5.00pm. This situation lasted until 1855 when the table d'hote was started again. The only surviving full price list shows that by 1862 the Club was providing a full food service throughout the day, and that it had a reasonably well stocked wine cellar. As we saw above, the Club occupied rented premises in the centre of town. In 1848 the Committee decided that "in order to insure as much as possible the quietness and privacy" of the Club, they would rent the two cottages adjoining it." These seem to have been owned by the same landlady as the Club itself - Sara Woodhead - for it was she who in February 1853 sent the Club a letter informing them that the rent for the club house was to be increased by £20 pa to £80, whilst the rent of the two cottages would stay at £20pa. This seems to have stimulated the committee members into considering the possibility of the Club owning its own premises. At the same meeting a sub-committee was formed to look into the idea of either buying the land on which the club house stood, or buying what is referred to in the minutes as 'Mr. Colley's premises on the East'. In March of the same year the committee discussed buying 'Mr. Dixion's house in Norfolk Row for the erection of a new club house (this would seem to be John Dixion, a solicitor and member of the Club who died in 1854). M E Hadifeld was asked to consult with Dixion and was given the power to offer up to £1,200 for the site. Nothing seems to have come of these inquiries and in July 1853 the committee agreed to the rent increases under threat of a years notice to quit. A further plan to raise capital in the form of £25 shares for the purchase of new premises was discussed at the committee meeting on the 27 April 1857. It would appear that some preliminary costing had been done for the projected house, as the minutes of the AGM held in February of the next year give a planned cost of £6,000. The minutes also reveal that due to the slump that occurred during 1857, the plan was abandoned. Once again the scheme rested for a few years until 1860 when, at the AGM, the plan to sell £25 shares was revived. This time the plan seems to have been successful because the Committee announced at the next AGM that it had purchased the site for the new club house and that Hadfield had been asked to draw up plans. The tenders having been placed, the committee recorded in its minutes for 1 April 1861 that the quotations received had exceeded the amount they were willing to spend and that the £25 shares should be increased to £30. A week later the committee gave the building sub-committee the power to place the contract for the exterior of the building with a Mr. Conran at a cost of £3,990. From this point forward the work on the new building seems to have gone at a smart pace, for at the AGM held on 10th February 1862 the committee recorded that the exterior of the house was completed and a year later the Club had moved in. This move was necessary if the Club was to accommodate the increasing number of members which it had. As we have seen, the original plan to raise the capital for the new club house had been to sell shares at £25. This, however, proved to be too small a sum and in April 1861 the committee agreed to increase each share by £5. In the meantime, the land on which the building was to be erected had been bought in December 1860 by M.E. Hadfield and Bernard Wake for £2,020 10s. The site - which stood on the corner of Norfolk Street and Mulberry Street - consisted of 447 square yards and was already built on. The total cost of buying the land and erecting the new club house was £7,200 and the draft Deed of Association of the Sheffield Club shows that this was raised by the sale of 240 shares. Hadfield and Wake, as the nominal owners of the land and building, passed their ownership to 12 trustees - of which they were two - who in turn leased the property to six lessees for 21 years at £360 per annum. The trustees and the committee of management for the year 1863-4 were identical: viz., John Dixion , W F Dixion jun. (silver-plater), Hadfield, F T Mappin (steel smelter and tool manufacturer), Richard Martin (silver-plater), C E Smith (accountant), Thomas Smith(solicitor), R B Streatfield (steel smelter and tool manufacturer), Bernard Wake (solicitor), Frederick Ward (cutlery manufacturer; son of T A Ward), H E Watson (solicitor) and Benjamin Wightman (solicitor). The opening of the new building was reported in three of the local papers. The copy for the reports was virtually identical in all of them. The Independent, taking up the theme of 'improvement' began by stating that "The inconvenience of the old Club House has long been felt, and this new building is the result of a spirited effort on the part of the members, who determined to have a building worthy of themselves and the town." In the layout of its rooms, and the floors on which they were placed the Sheffield Club seems to have followed the pattern of at least two London Clubs: The Athenaeum and The Reform. On the ground floor were the Coffee Room, "45 feet long and 25 feet wide, and 14 high - a noble apartment"; the steward's office; a "breakfast or morning room, 18 feet by 14 feet" and "very complete lavatories and retiring rooms". On the first floor, the reading-room or library "45 feet by 27 feet, and 14 feet high.": "This apartment is furnished in walnut and green Utrecht velvet, richly carpeted: but the chief attractions are the mantelpieces at each end of the room. A glass panelling of noble dimensions, in a walnut frame inlaid with tulip-wood and richly gilten tablature, surmounts an arch of green Belgian marble, in the keystone of which is inserted a timepiece, and on beautifully inlaid pedestals are tripod lamps, six feet high."' The committee room and the 'private dining room' were on the same floor. Above them was the billiard room, plus "a small smoke room".On the top floor were five bedrooms for the use of members staying overnight. Each of these floors was connected at the front of the house by a five feet wide staircase of "Elland-edge stone with electro-bronze balustrade", and at the back by a stone staircase which also went down to the cellar. Here the servants’ quarters were located consisting of a kitchen, scullery, larder, wine cellars, servants’ hall etc. The Sheffield Times concludes its article: "Of the exterior it is scarcely necessary to speak. It has a solid English and thoroughly genteel look, expressing with boldness and truth its purpose, being a town residence, such as abound in the older parts of London, of palladium architecture, of the school of Inigo Jones."' The move to the new building was occasioned by other drains on the resources of the Club. At the Annual Meeting held on the 8 February 1864 the committee reported on the fact that they had been instructed by the last meeting to "purchase entirely new Furniture for the Dining and Reading Room; this step was absolutely necessary to make the furnishing of the Club consistent with the building itself". This had involved the committee in £1,000 worth of expenditure. In order to cover this amount they suggested that the members should make a loan to the Club - with interest - in sums of £120 each. However, as has been seen the membership of the Club does not seem to have been very willing to part with its money, and at the next General Meeting the committee had to report that the response had been so bad that they had been obliged to give their personal guarantee to the Bank Almost half of the 1868 Sheffield Magistrates Bench were members of the Club: Club Members H Wilkinson - Silver-plater - Unitarian - Liberal J W Hawksworth - Steel and tools - Congregational - Liberal S Butcher - Steel and cutlery - Anglican - Tory J Brown - Steel and tools - Anglican - Tory R Jackson - Steel and tools - Unitarian - Liberal W Fisher - Ivory, bone etc. dealer - Unitarian - Liberal H Harrison - Cutlery manufacturer T Jessop - Steel smelter - Unitarian - Liberal W F Dixion - Silver-plater - Methodist - Tory Not Club Members J Webster - Solicitor T R Barker - White lead manufacturer - Liberal J J Smith - Stove grade manufacturer - Methodist - Tory E Vickers - Steel and tools - Methodist - Liberal T Dunn - Coal owner - Congregationalist - Liberal J Haywood - "Gentleman" T Blake - Retired partner from Wm. Greaves and Son, steel and cutlery H E Hoole - Stove grate manufacturer - Congregationalist - Liberal Rev. John Hand - Rector of Handsworth - Anglican Wm. Jeffcock - Coal Owner - Congregationalist - Liberal R Bayley - "Gentleman" J B Brown - Land agent - Liberal
  2. 1856 Whites has "The GYMNASIUM and SCHOOL of ARMS, in Clarkehouse road, was erected in 1854, by a company of shareholders, and is under the able superintendence of Mr. Wm. Percy. It is an extensive brick building, comprising billiard and news room, a rifle gallery, an American bowling alley, a racket court, commodious dressing rooms, and a large gymnasium, well fitted up for the practice of athletic exercises, fencing, &c." 1854 Kelly's has William Percy at 4 Clarkehouse Lane. (I believe this was renamed Clarkehouse Road)
  3. This morning I went under Bramall Lane Bridge and investigated further. The far end of the bridge's route (now under the Decathlon car park) is 100 metres from the Staples car park end already shown on this thread (the measurements are marked along the way to aid workmen). I post pictures of the other end of the bridge and an outflow inside the culvert that I think was originally from the Vulcan works dam and water power site. Although I'm happy to be wrong again
  4. If the sign for Chippinghouse Rd has been removed illegally, the council and the police should be involved. As for the old street lights loads of them were delivered to farm just outside Sheffield to be sold on, not by Amey but by their employees, when the Wicker was being improved ? the work took far longer than planned for because the workers were removing the old tramlines to be sold as scrap. The little lane at the rear of the Rutland pub hundreds of cobbles were removed and sold on instead of replacing them.
  5. As far as I know all the tram trains are fitted with the signalling systems they need, but only 4 at a time are supposed to have the 'railway' wheelsets. There is apparently a 5th set of spare 'railway' wheels, should they be needed. Which I guess they probably have been! The wheel profiles are interesting because, as Lemmy said, a compromise profile was designed for the tram-train route vehicles. Apparently ordinary tram wheels can't run on Network Rail and ordinary train wheels can't run on the old Supertram network. I say 'old' because even the compromise wheels can't run on the grooved street track which existed on most of the system. However with the recent rail replacement work I would hope they've had enough foresight to change the rail so compromise wheelsets will eventually be able to work everywhere. Are you confused yet? You will be...! Read on... Now... two out of the 7 tram trains have been onvolved in fairly serious accidents, strangely both in almost the same place. This has resulted in the vehicles involved being split up, with the good end and mid section of one tram-train being coupled to the undamaged end of the other one. The swapped end has been renumbered to carry the same fleet number as the good end and mid section, so this vehicle isn't completely the vehicle it was when it entered service. Meanwhile the smashed up ends and other mid section have been put together and I believe they have now been sent back to Bombardier, who I think ought to send them back with bull-bars fitted! As to the reasons for the accidents, I can only comment on the first one because I don't know the full details of the second. Apparently the lorry ran a red light. However the tram hit it in the side, so the tram hit the lorry, the lorry did NOT hit the tram. Although the lorry driver has been blaimed for the accident, I don't think this is entirely correct or fair. Trams (unlike trains) should always be driven on sight. In other words, the driver should only drive to what he or she can actually see ahead of them, just like road vehicles. Trains are not operated on line of sight, being totally reliant on signals. At the time of the incident, the tram-train was acting as a TRAM on the TRAMWAY, so should have been operating according to line of sight and should have been able to stop for any obstacles that came into view. As the tram hit the side of the lorry, which was already crossing the line, I believe the tram should have been able to stop. The fact it didn't opens up a whole host of questions. Was it travelling too fast? Did the driver apply the brakes? Did the brakes work? It seems strange that the Siemens built trams have been operating over that junction for over two decades without any major incidents, but the tram-trains have suffered two very similar incidents within a couple of months. One thing I'm not sure of is how the braking system of the tram-trains works. The Siemens trams have a number of braking systems, including magnetic track brakes, which are long flat shoes that clamp down directly onto the track when activated. These are VERY effective and are not normally used except in an emergency because they could easily catapult the passengers through the windscreen. That's how good they are! But do tram-trains also have them? If they don't, that will definitely mean they can't stop as quickly. Maybe MadAnnie or Lemmy could enlighten me? Finally... The whole 'experiment' is nonsence anyway! In reality wheel profiles don't actually matter all that much. provided the flange of the wheel will fit in the slot of grooved track, pretty much anything will work. It might not be ideal, but it will work. Historically this has been proved time and time again. Railway coal wagons used to make extensive use of the old Glasgow tramway. All they did in Glasgow was lay the tram tracks a quarter inch further apart so the railway wagons with their deeper flanges ran in the bottom of the grooves, not on the rail head. Also the Blackpool Loco, now at Crich, was originally used to haul yet more coal wagons on the Blackpool system, mainly between Copse Road Deopt in Fleetwood and a coal yard at Thornton Gate. It's not rocket science to make a tram run on a railway or a train on a tramway (Weymouth Quay anyone?)
  6. That was my understanding too, when I made a one hour programme for BBC Radio Sheffield in 1980 called "Up The Pole, Down Memory Lane," in which I revisited Jimmy Jewel's childhood haunts with him, knocking on the door of his old home, going to see his name in the school register at Western Road Juniors and walking with him on The Bolehills where he showed me where he smoked his first cigarette, and then going on to the stage of the then-derelict Lyceum Theatre where he recalled his upbringing in a "showbiz" family on the Music Hall circuit. I don't recall him talking about Andover St. My interest in the pair was sparked by recalling the people of Crookes talking about them when I was visiting Western Road with my mate John whose grandparents lived there....and, of course, listening to them on The Light Programme at Sunday dinner time when they were as much a part of Sunday as Yorkshire Pudding. In his later years, when he was doing quite well as a straight actor, Jimmy had a very serious side to him which I would have liked to have seen developed by the BBC as a living history of a part of the nation's fabric that was called Music Hall. It would have sat well along Suzy Klein's recent programmes recalling people like George Formby. Sadly my career took me away from the City before it could be developed and then, suddenly, it was too late, Jimmy Jewel was no more. Sheffield should celebrate two of its sons who were as famous in their time as Morecambe and Wise...and in my view actually funnier, especially since they wrote all their own material. A statue on The Bolehills would be appropriate! Or slap in the Middle of the Lyceum/Crucible complex. But somebody's bound to find a political incorrectness about them. My favourite recollection of Jimmy is of him tenderly looking after his long-suffering wife in their luxury apartment in Kensington, surrounded by the memorabilia of a lifetime of comedy. He was a lovely man.
  7. Plan of The Bramall Lane Ground. Sheffield Daily Telegraph 24 May 1906
  8. Many thanks everyone for all the information! Southside's 1853 map certainly shows Bramall Lane Bridge clearly, as does boginspro's from a similar time. It does seem that Vulcan Works Bridge was off to the side over the goit. So my title is wrong but I'll leave it to show the work done here by others I need to narrow down the date of construction now and next time I go through the culvert I'll look closer at the work as the current culvert is clearly longer than the original bridge and the joins should be clear (also the goit exit from the river may still be visible). I'll try and light the tunnel up enough to take photos.
  9. Fanfare of Trumpets announcing the commencement of Empire Day ( I think it says 24th May 1906 ) at Bramall Lane. There is also a picture of the City of Sheffield Pipe Band at Sheffield’s Coronation pageant on Empire Day 24th May 1906 on this link to their page. https://cityofsheffieldpipe.band/p-m-george-urquhart/
  10. At the bottom of Twenty Well Lane on the opposite side to Dore and Totley Station is Mercia Motors which deal in quality second hand cars. Prior to this it was Jeep main dealers which I think was part of the Hadfield's group. I've no idea who it belonged to prior to Jeep. Wazzie Worrall
  11. According to the tiny bit of information given in Grace`s guide to British Industrial History, the Vulcan Works in 1797 was in the ownership of Ebenezer Berdikin, Anvil Maker. So i guess it was foundry of some description? httsearch=Vulcan+ps://www.gracesguide.co.Works+Sheffield&fulltext=uk/Special:Search? A couple of maps of the area in 1853 showing the location of Bramall Lane Bridge and a couple of the other bridges over the Porter in 1853. https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/435500/38750 Also a Picture Sheffield Photograph of the Porter Brook in 1956, you can just about make out the name Yorkshire on the wall of the building in the background, anyone any idea where we are looking towards? http://www.picturesheffield.com/s41973
  12. Many thanks boginspro! The first photo I had seen before but not got the location right - the area could not have changed much more. I'll get photos over the next couple of days of the site. The map is really interesting. I was wondering if Vulcan Works and Bramall Lane bridges were one and the same, but clearly not. The current culvert may well incorporate some of both. It certainly goes under Hereford St whereas the map shows the two as not joined up.
  13. I think this is the bridge I referred to above looking from the St Mary's Lane end in 1949. http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s17137&pos=50&action=zoom&id=19810
  14. I think you are in the same place boginspro. I've never seen reference to a Bramall Lane Bridge so I'm back to Square One! Either way it's old, nice, hidden, and I'd love to find out more
  15. I may be wrong here as I have never seen the Decathlon car park or the former Staples car park, but your description sounds like the Bramall Lane Bridge over the Porter. I just wondered if the Vulcan Works Bridge may have been over the goit from the dam shown on your map.. EDIT - I have found this map showing what I think is the Bramall Lane Bridge, you could perhaps use the slider on the web page to overlay a modern map to see if I am in the right place. https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=18&lat=53.3738&lon=-1.4740&layers=168&b=1
  16. See the entry under SCHOOLS to find details of the latest Reunion event at Sharrow Lane School. Edit: Link ..
  17. Details of the much-requested next reunion of pupils from the years 1948-1958 are now available. It will take place at noon on Wednesday 27 November in the school hall cafe. Numbers will be strictly limited to 30 but if demand is sufficient then an additional date can be arranged. THIS WILL BE A CHRISTMAS LUNCH EVENT with turkey, pigs in blankets and all the trimmings, and an attractive seasonal vegetarian option. A hot drink, cracker and mints is included in the price. Dessert will be a choice of a mincemeat crumble or a chocolate pudding. One course £10.95, two courses £11.95. A decision is yet to be made on whether to make wine available or to accept corkage. A deposit of £5 will be required. Closing date for the deposit will be 12 November. I am happy to arrange for table reservations for groups who notify me of numbers in advance. I will also seek permission to have music to accompany carols etc if we get a good crowd. To participate in this event please respond to this notice as soon as possible. I will be monitoring responses. Or send me a personal message through this Forum. DO NOT SEND MONEY JUST YET! I will give details of how this will be done in the course of the next couple of weeks. But it is essential that, if this event is to happen and be successful, you tell all your peer group and get them to respond quickly. I shall also be posting this notice on the Sheffield Forum and will be contacting all those whose email addresses I already have. If you don't get an email from me it will be because I don't have your email address listed. David France (1946-53)
  18. Old Rider you are a star. When our kids were growing up we used to call the stone built cottage 'the Farm', the kids had stories about it being haunted and that witches lived there. (At that time the biggest witch lived at No.10 Downing Street!). I never knew it had been a shop, however that would make sense. People didn't have cars to take them to supermarkets, which were also very much in the future. Basics were bought from small traders whose profit margins must have been tiny. Before we moved to Archer Lane we lived on Buttermere Road - part of the Abbeydale Lake District! If you look at any pre-1960's Kelly's Directory the number of small traders listed on Buttermere/Crumock/Conistone/Windermere etc. is mind boggling, as it is all over the working class areas of Sheffield. Buttermere Road Abortionist - When we lived on Buttermere Road, part of the Abbeydale Road ‘Lake District’ in the 1970’s, several of the older residents told us of the famous case of the ‘Buttermere Road Abortionist’, who was imprisoned for the illegal services she performed. However, I have no idea of the person’s name or when these crimes took place. Can anybody help please? Wazzie Worrall
  19. Hi Old Rider, I think your Grandfather may well be right. However I don't remember Mr Jennings or any other shops around that part of Archer Lane. We moved into Archer Lane in 1979 and left in 1988. Our neighbour for the first few years was Mrs Vaugh, who together with her late husband had lived in the house since it was built in the 1930's. Mrs Vaugh once told me that before the council houses where Cllr Lambert and his wife lived were built, there was a large water tank which took a direct hit during the blitz. Cheers, Wazzie Worrall
  20. Hi, I realised after I sent the posting that the picture was Cllr Lambert. For many years he lived opposite us on Archer Lane. He has the block of flats in the Park complex named after him, Harold Lambert Court. Cheers, Wazzie Worrall
  21. I am trying to solve/research the history of a trophy “Presented by the Workmen & Friends of STC to J Lyon April 10th 1883”. J Lyon would be Joseph Lyon(s) originally from Waddington in Lincolnshire. Married to Emma (nee Staples) also from Lincolnshire. The trophy has been passed down the family through generations however, the story behind what it was presented for has long been lost/forgotten. On the1881 census Joseph’s occupation is recorded as Stable Labourer. He and his family are living at 19 Mill Lane, Attercliffe Cum Darnell , Sheffield. Joseph died (unknown) just 3 years later in 1886. Working on the assumption that The STC were probably Joseph’s employer. Can anyone please share any information in identifying who/what the STC were? If there are any surviving employee records? Any information greatly appreciated John O.
  22. Opposite the cinema by Leppings lane was a newsagent run by Ron Starling who was an ex professional footballer.
  23. Kelly's directory, published 1925. Simmonett Walter, plumber, 43 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow). Simmonett Walter, plumber, 14 Ellin Street, (Town, Moorfoot area). Simmonett Arnold, (junior), plumber, 24 Rushdale Avenue, (Meersbrook). Simmonett Walter Ernest, (junior) plumber, 26 Murray Road, (Greystones). White's directory, published 1911. Simmonett Walter, plumber, house: 37 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow). Simmonett Walter, plumber, Hermitage Lane, (Town, Moorfoot area). Simmonett Walter Ernest, (junior) plumber, 26 Murray Road, (Greystones). White's, published 1905. Simmonett Walter (junior), plumber, 37 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow).
  24. Family deaths: PASS Martha 4 May 1845 50 Sheffield, Bailey Lane widow St Peter PASS George 20 Feb 1849 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane son of Charles (grinder) St Peter PASS Martha 22 Feb 1835 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane daughter of Joseph (grinder) St Peter PASS Sarah 21 Jan 1838 1 year old or one day old Sheffield, Bailey Ln daughter of Joseph (grinder) St Peter PASS Mary 14 Sep 1842 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane daughter of John St Peter PASS Margaret 14 Jul 1844 29 Sheffield, Bailey Lane widow of Joseph (grinder) St Peter I think George Hunter was The grandson of Martha Pass. Relatives of Ernest and Ann Hunter HUNTER Joseph 20 Sep 1835 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane so Ernest (cutler) St Peter HUNTER George 14 Jul 1854 17 Sheffield, Bailey Lane so Ernest (cutler) St Peter HUNTER Samuel 10 Sep 1852 1 Sheffield, Bailey Lane so Ernest (cutler) St Peter In 1856 Ernest Hunter was now a shopkeeper at 32 Bailey Lane he was still there in 1862 but by 1879 Frederick.Dixon listed as shop & beer retailer had bought the shop.
  25. 26 Jan 1910 Sheffield Daily Telegraph A CHAPELTOWN TRAGEDY OF 45 YEARS AGO __________________ Recalled by a Letter from Australia __________________ Mrs Ann Walton, an inmate of Sir Edward Sylvester's Almshouses, Mortomley Lane End, has received the following letter from her cousin Solomon Stenton, who was in 1865, at York Assizes, sentenced to 20 years penal servitude for the manslaughter of his grandmother Eliza Drabble at Chapeltown nr Sheffield in March 1865. Post Office, Waddington, Western Australia December 12. 1909 My dear Cousin. – I take the opportunity to write to let you know I am still alive, and well except that rheumatics torment me occasionally. I had a letter from Joe 4 years ago which I answered but I cannot hear any tidings of Bentley. I am getting the old age pension now which is a great help to me. I should like to communicate with Thomas Fairies, and Mrs Howson, if they are still alive. I remember Ben Whyke as on the day I left England; also Shep Barras, Pincher, Link Jackson, Toby and Tom Howson. Send my best regards to Eliza Rodgers. The happiest days of my life out here is when I am in the bush with my gun and my dog. The poor old lady (my wife) died 4 years ago, and I am left all to myself. Send me a long letter and let me know if Joe is still in Canada, and I will write to him. We are having very warm weather out here – 100 degrees in the shade. I will conclude now by wishing you a happy New Year. – I remain, your affectionate Cousin. SOLOMON STENTON At the time of the tragedy on March, 1865, Solomon Stenton worked at Thorncliffe Ironworks and lived with his grandmother at Greenhead, Chapeltown. It was payday at Thorncliffe and Stenton met the old lady at night and gave her his wages. The two spent some time together at one of the local inns and set off for home around 9pm. Shortly afterwards Eliza Stenton was found lying upon the road at Greenhead. She was dead and had been brutally ill used. Her grandson Solomon was the last person seen with her, and as he could not give a satisfactory explanation he was arrested and at the Coroners inquest the jury returned a verdict of 'Wilful murder' against him. At the Assizes in York, the capital charge was reduced to manslaughter. He was found guilty and sentenced to 20 years transportation. A very large number of Chapeltown people, however had strong opinions that Stenton was innocent, and this feeling spread, and another man's name was freely mentioned as the possible culprit. In 1877 the matter was taken up by request of Mr Tom Fairies, and at a public meeting he was requested to prepare a petition to the authorities, praying for the case to be reopened. The petition was duly signed by a large number of persons and duly forwarded to the Right Hon. Richard Cross, Home Secretary at that time who duly acknowledged the receipt of the same. After some time had lapsed an official intimation reached Chapeltown that Stenton had been liberated on Ticket of Leave having served 12 years of his sentence. It is very likely that Stenton wishes to communicate with Mr Fairies on account of the services of the latter.
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