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Found 8,502 results

  1. Orchard Lane in Sheffield City Centre Great photo of Orchard Lane showing Boy Scout and Girl Guide Depot with the Grand Hotel in the background. Anyone know what is on the site today?
  2. Kelly's directory, published 1925. Simmonett Walter, plumber, 43 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow). Simmonett Walter, plumber, 14 Ellin Street, (Town, Moorfoot area). Simmonett Arnold, (junior), plumber, 24 Rushdale Avenue, (Meersbrook). Simmonett Walter Ernest, (junior) plumber, 26 Murray Road, (Greystones). White's directory, published 1911. Simmonett Walter, plumber, house: 37 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow). Simmonett Walter, plumber, Hermitage Lane, (Town, Moorfoot area). Simmonett Walter Ernest, (junior) plumber, 26 Murray Road, (Greystones). White's, published 1905. Simmonett Walter (junior), plumber, 37 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow).
  3. I miss the narrow lanes of old Sheffield like this ------- (c) Picture Sheffield ------ http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s13985&pos=1&action=zoom&id=16824
  4. Another amazing Sheffield photograph here showing years gone by in the Steel City! On this occasion it's a photo showing a Campo Coffee advertisement billboard on Campo Lane Question is whereabouts on Campo Lane is this?
  5. I am looking into my family history. One of my ancestors, Joseph Turton, lived at 120 Dam Lane in 1861. Does anyone know whereabouts this was please? I imagined it to be around the Crooksmoor area but I can't find it. Many thanks for looking.
  6. Family deaths: PASS Martha 4 May 1845 50 Sheffield, Bailey Lane widow St Peter PASS George 20 Feb 1849 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane son of Charles (grinder) St Peter PASS Martha 22 Feb 1835 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane daughter of Joseph (grinder) St Peter PASS Sarah 21 Jan 1838 1 year old or one day old Sheffield, Bailey Ln daughter of Joseph (grinder) St Peter PASS Mary 14 Sep 1842 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane daughter of John St Peter PASS Margaret 14 Jul 1844 29 Sheffield, Bailey Lane widow of Joseph (grinder) St Peter I think George Hunter was The grandson of Martha Pass. Relatives of Ernest and Ann Hunter HUNTER Joseph 20 Sep 1835 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane so Ernest (cutler) St Peter HUNTER George 14 Jul 1854 17 Sheffield, Bailey Lane so Ernest (cutler) St Peter HUNTER Samuel 10 Sep 1852 1 Sheffield, Bailey Lane so Ernest (cutler) St Peter In 1856 Ernest Hunter was now a shopkeeper at 32 Bailey Lane he was still there in 1862 but by 1879 Frederick.Dixon listed as shop & beer retailer had bought the shop.
  7. 26 Jan 1910 Sheffield Daily Telegraph A CHAPELTOWN TRAGEDY OF 45 YEARS AGO __________________ Recalled by a Letter from Australia __________________ Mrs Ann Walton, an inmate of Sir Edward Sylvester's Almshouses, Mortomley Lane End, has received the following letter from her cousin Solomon Stenton, who was in 1865, at York Assizes, sentenced to 20 years penal servitude for the manslaughter of his grandmother Eliza Drabble at Chapeltown nr Sheffield in March 1865. Post Office, Waddington, Western Australia December 12. 1909 My dear Cousin. – I take the opportunity to write to let you know I am still alive, and well except that rheumatics torment me occasionally. I had a letter from Joe 4 years ago which I answered but I cannot hear any tidings of Bentley. I am getting the old age pension now which is a great help to me. I should like to communicate with Thomas Fairies, and Mrs Howson, if they are still alive. I remember Ben Whyke as on the day I left England; also Shep Barras, Pincher, Link Jackson, Toby and Tom Howson. Send my best regards to Eliza Rodgers. The happiest days of my life out here is when I am in the bush with my gun and my dog. The poor old lady (my wife) died 4 years ago, and I am left all to myself. Send me a long letter and let me know if Joe is still in Canada, and I will write to him. We are having very warm weather out here – 100 degrees in the shade. I will conclude now by wishing you a happy New Year. – I remain, your affectionate Cousin. SOLOMON STENTON At the time of the tragedy on March, 1865, Solomon Stenton worked at Thorncliffe Ironworks and lived with his grandmother at Greenhead, Chapeltown. It was payday at Thorncliffe and Stenton met the old lady at night and gave her his wages. The two spent some time together at one of the local inns and set off for home around 9pm. Shortly afterwards Eliza Stenton was found lying upon the road at Greenhead. She was dead and had been brutally ill used. Her grandson Solomon was the last person seen with her, and as he could not give a satisfactory explanation he was arrested and at the Coroners inquest the jury returned a verdict of 'Wilful murder' against him. At the Assizes in York, the capital charge was reduced to manslaughter. He was found guilty and sentenced to 20 years transportation. A very large number of Chapeltown people, however had strong opinions that Stenton was innocent, and this feeling spread, and another man's name was freely mentioned as the possible culprit. In 1877 the matter was taken up by request of Mr Tom Fairies, and at a public meeting he was requested to prepare a petition to the authorities, praying for the case to be reopened. The petition was duly signed by a large number of persons and duly forwarded to the Right Hon. Richard Cross, Home Secretary at that time who duly acknowledged the receipt of the same. After some time had lapsed an official intimation reached Chapeltown that Stenton had been liberated on Ticket of Leave having served 12 years of his sentence. It is very likely that Stenton wishes to communicate with Mr Fairies on account of the services of the latter.
  8. A visit to Green Lane Works and Eagle Works in Kelham just after the site had been cleared of the ancillary buildings. January and February 2012. Please do get in touch in you have any more old photos, or history of the sites. I am trying to compile a historic timeline from the early days of Kelham.
  9. I had a nosey along the current Jew Lane the other day, walked past it loads of times but never along it. Im wondering if it used to be more of a thoroughfare than it is now? Anyone know anything of its history? From other threads there was a Jehu Lane which was where Fitzalan Sq is now, which currently contains all the bookmakers. Im referring to the current Jew Lane that has an entrance on Fitzalan Sq that runs between what is now the Coral bookmakers and the building that used to be the Blue Bel pub, and an entrance on Commercial St.. Heres a view from Commercial St.. From Fitzalan Sq, Looking down Jew Lane from Fitzalan Sq.. Looking back up Jew Lane towards Fitzalan Sq.. Having walked down Jew Lane from Commercial St, here it turns 90 degs right up to Fitzalan Sq. I wonder what this white brick building used to be?..
  10. I know Brunswick Road. Pitsmoor, (AKA localy "Champs Hill") was once called "Tom Cross Lane", But who was Tom Cross, and when / why was the name changed to Brunswick Road.? Does any one know ?
  11. Hi Bob, Yes I remember Mr Spur's Beetle, although I'm a little vague on actual detail. Did it have the 'split oval' rear window? Was it only three speed? I've no memory of Mr Ioson' s Borgward Isabella, but I remember his bike. My brother always insisted that he llived on School Lane at Norton, but my brother was prone to get things mixed up! . However, I do remember that Mr Dyson had an 'inverted rear window' Ford Anglia - must have been quite a new model when we were in J3/4? We'll keep on probing my old pal! Best wishes, Wazzie
  12. Hello Sheffield History Friends, I thought some of you would be interested in this project that has started recently the site explains itself. https://www.facebook.com/groups/435104566849685/
  13. Hello frechylass , The Old No 12 (Market Tavern) Berni Inn was on Exchange Street. I may be wrong here but I think the Dore Grill on Church Lane, Dore was a Berni Inn. There are a few posts on here mentioning Berni Inns, There might be the odd comment in one of those that helps, link below . ---------- EDIT I think the one on Orchard Street was just called Berni Steak Bar or something like that. https://cse.google.co.uk/cse?cx=partner-pub-3209186142524727%3A3018540469&ie=UTF-8&q=&sa=Search#gsc.tab=0
  14. Well spotted, I missed the sign, so perhaps not a very temporary thing like site entrance. I am sure the name of the arcade is related to Cambridge Street (previously Coal Pit Lane) but have never seen any evidence of an earlier road just where the arcade was. Pinstone Street as we know it didn't appear until after 1880 and I think the arcade was built soon after that. Up to 1960 Cambridge Street lined up just about directly with the top of the Moorhead triangle that surrounded the Crimea Monument and I may be wrong but think the addresses on that bit were Moorhead. This photo' from an earlier post probably explains better what I mean ---------------- https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/16570-a-birds-eye-view-of-old-sheffield/?tab=comments#comment-139917 ------------------ and this other early post has some good information about the general area --------------------- https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/15327-68-pinstone-street-in-1881/?tab=comments#comment-131019
  15. sovrappeso : The shops on Derbyshire Lane from the 1957 Kellys Street Directory
  16. I’m researching Sheffield United's Bramall Lane and would like to explore the history and folklore of the area around the ground. Are there any interesting stories (people, families, companies, works, pubs, local legend etc.) that have emanated from the area over the last few centuries? The history of the Bramall Lane ground itself is well documented but the lesser known past of the surrounding neighbourhoods might be better illuminated by the collective knowledge of local historians, researchers, enthusiasts and residents. Thanks in advance for your time and any responses. Incidentally, I am using the following reference books for my ground research. If there are other recommendations, I'd love to hear them. Before and After Bramall Lane: Sheffield United Cricket Club and Yorkshire Cricket in Sheffield The story of cricket at Bramall Lane : The end of an era 1855-1973 Bombs Over Bramall Lane: Growing Up in 1940s Sheffield 150 years of Bramall Lane Football Grounds of Britain (Simon Inglis) I’ve also tried to find Bramall Lane, 1855-1955 by C. M Marston, with no luck.
  17. I remember buying a flat pink packet at a School Fete of what I thaught were sugar crystals. Put my finger in to suck the flavour! turned out it was 'Pink Blancmange Powder' UGH! - Once blew a giant pink 'Bubble of Bubble Gum'. The wind blew the bubble back into my hair. Oh what a mess! took ages to get out, with quite a bit of my hair by being cut. My Mum told me, that when visiting her cousins who lived near the railway in Chesterfield, they would put old 'Pennies On The Line', sit and wait till a train had gone past, then go and pick up the 'Flattened' coins. - She also told me that she ate 'COAL' as a little one. Wonder if that's why she lost all her teeth at 18.
  18. The one picture I wish I could see again was printed with this article in the early fifties. I wonder if any of the families mentioned has it, my grandmother was one of them mentioned we have the article but no picture.A small piece of social history. We need to take a firmer grasp of this paradox----that our very differences show our unity. It will restore our faith in ourselves; It will enable us to see (IN THE KINGS WORDS); We have not proved unworthy of our past, And we can do better in the years ahead. In skill, genius, enterprise, imaginativeness, virility, and courage we lack nothing that is needed to give us the industrial prosperity our fathers built. Every workshop in the land can give evidence of that. And who can say that court 13 watery lane, off St Philips Road, does not give the best evidence of all the continuance of the spirit which made us great. There the families have painted their humble dwellings----so humble that they are marked down for demolition. That is their proud salute to the Festival Of Britain. It is a fitting footnote, for only by the happiness in British homes can British greatness be measured. Five families paint for the festival. Court 13 Watery lane off St Philips Road Sheffield shines with new paint, the festival of Britain gesture of five families who have repainted their cottages. Inside the two roomed homes of Mrs Nellie Dixon at number two and Mr and Mrs Simmonite at number three, there are new decorations,a tiled fireplace, and a white scullery. The houses are listed for eventual demolition. After their landlord had supplied a new asbestos roof, the families got busy outside with paint and borrowed ladders. "Because we have been asked to make our homes as bright as possible for the festival" They were joined by Mrs Hilda Ford at number ten. Mr and Mrs T Hayes at number nine and Mr and Mrs J Hobson of number 91 Watery lane which is in the court. They have done the job in a fortnight. Mrs Ford a table knife cutler painting on returning from work at teatime. Mrs Dixons daughter Mrs Cooper of Martin street is another member of the team "We all get on very well together" Mrs Simmonite said last night.
  19. Hi unrecordings, it is trees. There is clump in the Top Park, behind the old farm, and some huge ones at the top of the lane going down to the Forge, as well as some on the edge on the way down.
  20. Name listed in Kelly's directory, published 1957. "Bennett & Heron Ltd. cutlery mfrs. 58 Broad Lane & 104 Mary Street."
  21. This may have been my father's uncle, Joe (Joseph) France (not sure of that surname) who was one of a family of hawkers who mostly sold flowers they bought from Artindales in Sheaf Market. His sister (or at least I think that was the relationship) Martha, my grandmother, had her own pitch half way down Dixon Lane as related elsewhere on this topic. George France sold The Star at Moorhead outside The Grapes. If that picture IS Joe France, the last time I saw him he was somewhat older and living in a terraced house near the bottom of Foxhill Road, Wadsley Bridge. Martha was killed in 1960 by a hit and run driver whilst crossing East Bank Road and George died in poverty in Coleridge Ward at Fir Vale Infirmary. If, as The Star picture caption above suggests, the flower wholesalers gave flowers to the hawkers for free I would be vey surprised. But even if they were not free they would have charged very little for them, so enabling these people who had no other means to earn a sparse living. I doubt that would happen these days.
  22. Another couple from the same vendor: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Postcard-Fulwood-Quiet-Lane-Sheffield/303211484926?hash=item4698d016fe:g:glwAAOSwyWddEnvR https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Postcard-Fulwood-Forge-Dam-and-Annex-Hospital/303213867561?hash=item4698f47229:g:-CAAAOSwKDBdH4dS
  23. Hi CharB, been up to my friends at Norton Lees, walked down to look at the larger 'Corner Shop' corner of , Derbyshire Lane& Norton Lees Rd. We see that progress is been made on restoring the look of the shop, the canopy trimmings round the top of the premises are brilliant, can't wait to see it when it's finished looking like it used to be.
  24. Great mystery solved. It's no wonder I couldn't find it on the Sheffield History Maps as they don't cover that section! If anyone can locate any images of the buildings from Blast Lane to Lumley Street towards Woodbourn Road Bridge in the Lilac Area shown in this map it would be really helpful. The idea is to construct a 4mm Scale model of the section in Lilac. It might just stay a bit of idea as in that scale it would be about 70 foot long and 12 foot wide! Each track shown on the map would be 3cm wide. The Map shown is a later map and lots of changes to it!
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