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  1. Lemmy117

    Sheffield in 1966 - Film Footage

    I remember when it caught fire, I was out doing some road survey work in Brightside and got diverted on my way back to Manor Lane depot, really bad fire, loads of smoke. By that time I think the depot was run by National Carriers.
  2. madannie77

    Football stadium 1930's identification

    I am not sure that Bramall Lane had a stand like that one in the 1930s. I am wondering if it is a greyhound track, the white posts being the upright parts of the fence separating the track from the field. Not that I know much about dog tracks, and I can't find any images of the local ones from the right period.
  3. Edmund

    Andrews stationers Holly Lane

    G.D. Andrews, Commercial and Scholastic Stationers, were at 4 Holly Lane in 1931.
  4. I seem to think mistakenly that Andrews was there when I was at school in the 1950s. But I think it was much later! Where would we have bought our stationery before Andrews?
  5. Looks like Bramall Lane with the posts protecting the cricket square. Mind, it's about 50 year since I was last there so my recollection may be a bit faulty!
  6. SteveHB

    Sheffield Midland Train Station

    Howard Street, corner of Eyre Lane, looking down to Midland Station Hotel Date Period:1900-1919 https://www.picturesheffield.com/s17707
  7. 1911 Malvina Ashley 57 widow, 24 Harvest Lane Beerhouse Keeper Licenced Victualler own account.
  8. First mention of a Sheffield-made bicycle (using that term) seems to be an advertisement by Benjamin Gorrill in the 'Independent' 20 May 1869 – has anyone found an earlier reference? Here is a potted history of early bicycling in Sheffield (sourced mainly from pieces in the Sheffield Independent): In June 1869 local papers had a new epidemic to report, one that probably originated from Paris: In Sheffield and vicinity, the symptoms of that alarming malady, the bicycle fever, are becoming daily more strongly marked and developed... ...which might require ‘additional accommodation at the medical institutions of the town’ such as ‘extra facilities for the treatment of casualties’. Undeterred, the fabulous Browne Brothers appeared at the Alexandra Theatre in a display of bicycling dexterity, and in the same week the fever spread: A Bicycle Club is being formed at the Shakespeare Inn, Gibraltar Street, and there is every prospect of its being a complete success. (Independent, 2 June 1869) Tracing the beginnings of the ‘fever’ leads us back a month earlier, when a Bicycle Club was hastily founded at Sharrow (near Wilson's Snuff factory), launched at a crowded Pomona Hotel, with hundreds gathered outside to see a velocipede contest, when the bicycle made by local firm Beck and Candlish of Brown Street was generally agreed superior to one imported from Pickering's of New York. Going further back to April 20th, however, the ingenious Benjamin Gorrill had been first to announce his own make of ‘bicycle and tricycle velocipedes, of the best materials and workmanship’. He was the son of a scissor-maker of Eyre Street and named after his uncle Benjamin Gorrill the tailor (all of them are living together on Gibraltar Street in 1841). Young Benjamin started as a scissorsmith, branched out into Orrery-making (those rotating mechanical models of the sun, planets and moons) and announced his new-fangled velocipedes from Cadman Lane, Sheffield. His brother John Gorrill was an early rider in the Sheffield contests. Old photos of Cadman Lane show it to be narrow and fully cobbled (ouch). The Brown brothers from Liverpool (H and C Brown, before they added an ‘e’ to their name on the Alexandra stage) must have infected many with bicycle fever on the streets on 18th May, although the town’s geography was a challenge: Since the brothers have been in Sheffield they have tried to mount some of our hills, and have succeeded in getting up Snighill, Pond Hill, and have gone from Norfolk Street to Broomhill. In the afternoon of today they intend to try Paradise Square. Crowds of locals held their collective breath as the brothers ‘made an attempt to rise Paradise Street’, noting that ‘from Westbar, all the way up, it is very uneven, being paved with very rugged boulders’ (no doubt they were grateful for horsehair-filled saddles), but they ultimately failed to conquer the final dozen yards near the top. Henry Swan, curator of Ruskin’s Museum which opened a few years later on Bell Hagg Road, Walkley was one of the early pioneers of cycling, and must have faced the same problem addressing Walkley’s uncompromising gradients - an exercise only for the truly dedicated (Mr F Smith of the ‘Hawthorns’ and a certain one-legged Chinaman on bamboo bicycles notwithstanding – see elsewhere on this Forum)! Ruskin himself was not keen on the new contraptions: I not only object, but am quite prepared to spend all my ‘bad language’ in reprobation of the bi-, tri-, and 4-,5-, 6 or 7 cycles, and every other contrivance and invention for superseding human feet... (Ruskin;1888)
  9. Edmund

    Becoming a city.

    In January 1893 the Council appointed a special committee to consider and report on the best means of celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Incorporation of Sheffield, and in February at a special meeting , resolved to petition the Queen to confer the title of City on the borough. A week later it was announced that the request had been made. The Borough Jubilee Committee, at its first meeting, requested 28 representatives of various public bodies to discuss the celebrations and the holding of an exhibition to show the rapid growth of local trades. The outcome of this was a counter proposal that aimed for something more favourable to the inhabitants - a new building to be used as a Central Free Library at the junction of Church Street, Vicar Lane and St James Street (to replace the inadequate existing Central Library). In June the Jubilee Committee reported that the Town Trustees had refused to donate the required 1,120 yards of land needed so the scheme was abandonned. At the same meeting a public ball to take place on 24th August was suggested, to be financed by public subscription and ensuring that the aged poor could attend. This was veoed by the Council, but consent was given for a half holiday on that date, for council employees. Another special committee was set up to revise the Borough Arms and submit the new City Arms to the College of Arms for approval. On the 24th August (the actual Jubilee of the Incorporation), a number of council members attended an evening banquet at the Cutlers Hall. The Mayor was present, having just returned from Chatsworth and Hadon Hall, where he had entertained over 250 officials and others of the Corporation, in celebration of the Jublilee. The City was decorated and from noon taken as a holiday. On the 25th, 26th and other dates the Mayor provided all the council's worken (over 1,500) with tea and entertainment. Some more info here: http://www.calmview.eu/SheffieldArchives/CalmView/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=CA666&pos=22
  10. Court 13 Watery Lane from an aerial photo taken in 1938. My forebears originated just out of shot of here. Amazing area; gone but not forgotten.
  11. lysandernovo

    Old Abandoned Sheffield Factory

    It's a refractory brick factory ( Dysons Refractories) in Stannington/ Loxley valley using the locally plentiful supply of fire clay and coal to manufacture special heat resisting bricks for the steel industry! Production ceased in 2012.
  12. SteveHB

    Bottom of the Moor/St Mary's Gate

    Was William also a coal dealer? Simpson William, cowkeeper and coal dealer, New George Street. From White's directory, published 1862.
  13. Sheffield History

    Wheats Lane

    Wheats Lane features in this walk around the Paradise Square area
  14. Sheffield History

    WEST BAR - Sheffield City Centre

    Thank you very much! (I've split them up so Gimbal Walk is purely for abroad or UK, and Sheffield Videos is purely for Sheffield walks/drives/interviews etc) I've got a Bank Street walk coming up, and a Campo Lane and Paradise Square one coming real soon too!
  15. Has anyone answered the question of this thread, which one is taller? My guess is that Vulcan, as a pagan icon, was placed the highest. His Greek equivalent Hephaestus is carved on the arch of the Green Lane Works (with the goddess Athena on the other side). There’s also a couple of Mercury statues in city centre - one on the High Street (on top of the old Post Office building) and one on top of the Lyceum.
  16. AlanB

    City of Sheffield Police - The Beat Book

    I also joined Sheffield City Police, 3 Jan. 1961 and was posted to 3 Div, Whitworth Lane. When I was sworn in there were two other new constables, both of whom were former cadets. One of them was posted to B Div and the other, I think, to E Div. We all went to Pannal Ash together. Perhaps you are the B Div. officer ( whose father was a Sergeant). I won't use the name here for privacy purposes.
  17. anitamo

    Fitzalan Square

    I used to work.....mid 1960s at the Queens restaurant....underneath the Classic cinema. The restaurant's cold stores were down that lane.......one of them was for fruit and veg and the other one was where the game was hung until they were needed.
  18. Stunmon

    KEECHANS OR ANDREWS

    Thanks so much. Have been in touch with a guy I was at school with (many years ago) A Mick Ralston was his best friend but sadly has dementia. It seems that Reg and Peggy(Margaret Keesham) married and had Mick. Reg died from an illness in 1943 and then she married again to Metham. My parents must have met Reg and Peggie, possibly through the brother of Reg who was Bill, and Dorothy, his wife. I remember them when I was growing up. They had two daughters Valerie and Caroline. They may have all gone to the same church St.Patricks at Sheffield Lane Top. So, thats a bit of the family jigsaw puzzle solved thanks to you!!!
  19. Sheffield History

    Leppings Lane, Hillsborough

    Top photo of Leppings Lane is from 1905. The actual row of houses hasn't changed at all! The biggest difference is the loss of the chimneys in distance that belonged to Allen's Foundry
  20. BRIDGEHOUSES RAILWAY STATION Bridgehouses train station was the terminal station of the Sheffield, Ashton-under-Lyne and Manchester Railway from its opening in 1845 until the opening of the Wicker Arches, a 660-yard (600 m) long viaduct across the Don Valley, which supported the new Sheffield Victoria opened on 15 September 1851. On 1 January 1847 a half-mile connecting line to the Wicker station of the Midland Railway had been constructed in order to increase goods traffic and enable wagon transfers. This short steeply graded line, enclosed within a tunnel for almost its entire length was known locally as the Fiery Jack. By this time the railway operating company had become the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway, which in 1899 became the Great Central Railway. From 1851 Bridgehouses became the company's terminal for goods and cattle traffic. It remained open for freight until 1965. The station was approached by a ramp from Nursery Street and on the opposite corner a public house was built. Originally named "The Manchester Railway Hotel" its frontage was damaged in the Sheffield Flood of 1864 and was rebuilt (look at the alignment to the main building). It was renamed "The Manchester Hotel" and in spring 2006, after a short period of closure, it became "The Harlequin", taking the name from a recently demolished pub which stood a short distance away in Johnson Street. Part of the station site is now used as a car park and part of the retaining wall along Nursery Street has been demolished to make way for the northern section of Sheffield's Inner Ring Road. It has been suggested that this retaining wall might have contained stones from Sheffield Castle. Before the building of the "Borough Bridge", which carries Corporation Street across the River Don to reach Nursery Street, passenger access to the station from the city area was by a footbridge, depicted by an unknown artist, c. 1840.On the night of 11 March 1864, when the waters of the Great Sheffield flood poured over the bridge, a vast quantity of timber and debris came down with the force of a battering ram, and carried the footbridge away. A successor to this bridge is still standing adjacent to the new bridge which carries the Inner Ring Road over the River Don, although it is in need of restoration. The terminal was the subject of a BBC local television documentary "Engines must not enter the potato siding" which contained vintage film and memories from former railway workers and which was broadcast in November 1969 at the time of the rationalisation of goods traffic in the Sheffield area and the opening of the new Sheffield Freight Terminal in Brightside Lane.This was adjacent to the site of the former Midland Railway locomotive sheds and yard. The potato siding was situated high above the road and had a wooden floor, fine for wagons and vans but as the title says, not locomotives. The last mystery The building of the Sheffield Inner Ring Road (Derek Dooley Way) through the site took away the last remains of the yard but left one mystery, the unsolved murder of Sheffield prostitute Michaela Hague. She was working in the area on 5 November 2001 when she picked up a customer in a car and went to the Bridgehouses station site. She was killed in a frenzied knife attack and although found by police alive, she died later in hospital This film shows the demolition of Bridgehouses Railway Station in Sheffield
  21. Sheffield History

    The Sheffield Railwayman's Club

    The film also shows the demolition of Bridgehouses Railway Station in Sheffield Bridgehouses railway station was the terminal station of the Sheffield, Ashton-under-Lyne and Manchester Railway from its opening in 1845 until the opening of the Wicker Arches, a 660-yard (600 m) long viaduct across the Don Valley, which supported the new Sheffield Victoria opened on 15 September 1851. On 1 January 1847 a half-mile connecting line to the Wicker station of the Midland Railway had been constructed in order to increase goods traffic and enable wagon transfers. This short steeply graded line, enclosed within a tunnel for almost its entire length was known locally as the Fiery Jack. By this time the railway operating company had become the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway, which in 1899 became the Great Central Railway. From 1851 Bridgehouses became the company's terminal for goods and cattle traffic. It remained open for freight until 1965. The station was approached by a ramp from Nursery Street and on the opposite corner a public house was built. Originally named "The Manchester Railway Hotel" its frontage was damaged in the Sheffield Flood of 1864 and was rebuilt (look at the alignment to the main building). It was renamed "The Manchester Hotel" and in spring 2006, after a short period of closure, it became "The Harlequin", taking the name from a recently demolished pub which stood a short distance away in Johnson Street. Part of the station site is now used as a car park and part of the retaining wall along Nursery Street has been demolished to make way for the northern section of Sheffield's Inner Ring Road. It has been suggested that this retaining wall might have contained stones from Sheffield Castle. West portal of Bridgehouses Tunnel, which lay east of the station Before the building of the "Borough Bridge", which carries Corporation Street across the River Don to reach Nursery Street, passenger access to the station from the city area was by a footbridge, depicted by an unknown artist, c. 1840.On the night of 11 March 1864, when the waters of the Great Sheffield flood poured over the bridge, a vast quantity of timber and debris came down with the force of a battering ram, and carried the footbridge away. A successor to this bridge is still standing adjacent to the new bridge which carries the Inner Ring Road over the River Don, although it is in need of restoration. The terminal was the subject of a BBC local television documentary "Engines must not enter the potato siding" which contained vintage film and memories from former railway workers and which was broadcast in November 1969 at the time of the rationalisation of goods traffic in the Sheffield area and the opening of the new Sheffield Freight Terminal in Brightside Lane.This was adjacent to the site of the former Midland Railway locomotive sheds and yard. The potato siding was situated high above the road and had a wooden floor, fine for wagons and vans but as the title says, not locomotives. The last mystery The building of the Sheffield Inner Ring Road (Derek Dooley Way) through the site took away the last remains of the yard but left one mystery, the unsolved murder of Sheffield prostitute Michaela Hague. She was working in the area on 5 November 2001 when she picked up a customer in a car and went to the Bridgehouses station site. She was killed in a frenzied knife attack and although found by police alive, she died later in hospital
  22. Does anyone know what this building is/was on the corner of York Street and Campo Lane? Does it have a name?
  23. Sheffield History

    Wheats Lane

    Would not recommend the trip down this little lane. It seems it's an alleyway that the druggies have selected to use as their toilet so was easily the worst smelling place I've ever experienced. Not a great time walking down there. Anyway - this is Wheats Lane off Paradise Square. Thought you might appreciate the photos
  24. Yes I used to go to the Black Cat Club. This is where the Beatles were booked to play, but after the booking they became so famous that the venue had to be changed to the Azena on White Lane. Fortunately I had a ticket. My only claim to fame is that I touch John Lennon. It was a fantastic show.
  25. I've just been researching my next project, the Prudential Assurance Building on Pinstone Street, for a year after it was built part of it was used as a Hotel, seems it was run by a Mr Bird, after a dispute with Prudential he left the building, I've found listings that he had the Howard Restaurant in 1901 but there is no address, he also had a Restaurant at 25 Chapel Walk, while living at 21 Joshua Road, hes also listed at 28 Pinstone Street, could be he opened up here after leaving the Prudential building also I`ve found a Joseph Bird a grocer & beer retailer, 39 Haywood rd could he be a brother or son. All these listing are from 1901, there is a reference to a George Bird who was a partner in the Carter, Milner & Bird at the Hope Brewery on Mowbray Street, this company was closed on the deaths of Milner and Bird BUT George Bird`s son did restart the brewery in 1921 and in 1938 the Old Hope Brewery was closed down and production was transferred to a new site at Claywheels Lane . If anyone has any info on the Birds or the Restaurants mention I would be obliged .
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